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McCoy claims Grand National for the first time

McCoy (on the left) battles it out with Denis O'Regan on Black Apalachi in the closing stages at Aintree.
McCoy (on the left) battles it out with Denis O'Regan on Black Apalachi in the closing stages at Aintree.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Tony McCoy wins Grand National on 10-1 shot Don't Push It
  • Champion jockey McCoy had missed out on 14 previous attempts at Aintree
  • Owner JP McManus and trainer Jonjo O'Neill were also winning National for first time
  • Black Apalachi finishes second with State of Play in third

(CNN) -- Steeplechasing great Tony McCoy broke his Grand National duck by piloting 10-1 shot Don't Push It to Aintree triumph on Saturday.

The 14-time champion jockey in Britain had never won the sport's most famous race but gave the well-backed Jonjo O'Neill-trained mount the perfect ride over the treacherous 30 fences of the four and a half mile classic.

Irish hero McCoy was having his 15th ride in the race and seized his chance to take up the running from Black Apalachi as they approached the Elbow and powered clear up the final straight.

State of Play went one better than last year to finish third with Big Fella Thanks, co-favorite with Don't Push It, in fourth, ridden by Barry Geraghy, who was a late replacement for Ruby Walsh, injured in the previous race on the Aintree card.

17-year-old Sam Twiston-Davies on Hello Bud was also in the mix approaching the run-in but his mount faded.

It was the first Aintree triumph also for Don't Push It's legendary owner-gambler JP McManus.

I've won lots of big races and I'm supposed to be a good jockey, but to not win the Grand National would be a bit of a negative on the CV
--Tony McCoy
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Nina Carberry, attempting to become the first woman to win the race on Character Building, was given a great ride for seventh, just behind ever-consistent Snowy Morning.

Last year's winner Mon Mome fell at the 26th when going well, but this was all about McCoy, who has broken every jockey record in the book, but had always missed out on Grand National success.

A tearful McCoy told BBC Sport: "I'm being a big wuss. It means everything to me to win the Grand National.

"I've won lots of big races and I'm supposed to be a good jockey, but to not win the Grand National would be a bit of a negative on the CV.

"I'm delighted for my mum and dad as they've been great for me throughout the years, and for my wife Chanelle and my daughter Eve, who is two and a half.

"Hopefully now she'll be proud of me when she grows up."

McCoy's win was bad news for bookmakers in the biggest gambling event in UK horse racing, with estimates suggesting they had lost in the region of $1.5 million after Don't Push It had been backed down from 20-1 to joint favorite by punters.