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Casey escapes as Villegas misses sitter

Paul Casey, right, lines up a putt during his Match Play semifinal against Carlos Villegas.
Paul Casey, right, lines up a putt during his Match Play semifinal against Carlos Villegas.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Paul Casey will resume WGC Match Play semifinal against Camilo Villegas on Sunday
  • Last year's runner-up Casey survives as Colombian misses short putt on 23rd hole
  • His fellow Englishman Ian Poulter reaches final for first time, crushing Sergio Garcia
  • Poulter wins 7 and 6 for biggest semifinal margin in tournament history
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(CNN) -- Last year's runner-up Paul Casey will resume his titanic World Golf Championship Match Play semifinal against Camilo Villegas on Sunday after the Colombian missed a golden opportunity at the fifth extra hole in Arizona.

Villegas should have earned his place in the final against Ian Poulter, who thrashed Sergio Garcia 7 and 6, but missed a two-foot par putt on the 23rd before failing light finally called an end to Saturday's play at Dove Mountain in Tucson.

Both Casey and Villegas have struggled throughout the match in tough early conditions as they battled wind and rain, but on the back nine the Englishman fired three birdies in five holers to level and went one-up at 15.

However, former world No. 3 Casey bogeyed 18 to send the match into extra holes, and the duo halved the first three holes with pars and then birdied the fourth.

Casey then found a bunker and then short rough before two-putting for a bogey, but Villegas could not make his short par attempt in the increasing gloom.

"I should have made that putt," he told the tournament's official Web site.

Poulter trounced his European Ryder Cup teammate Garcia in the biggest semifinal margin of the tournament's history to reach the final for the first time and give himself a chance of moving up to fifth in the world rankings.

Poulter led from the first hole against the Spaniard, with the only blot being a controversial incident when the Englishman at first asked to take a free drop at the seventh when his wayward approach shot left a television tower between his ball and the flag.

After a lengthy discussion with the referees and Garcia, Poulter changed his mind and eventually lost the hole but bounced back to win the next four holes with birdies.

"He's the one who has to live with it," Garcia said. "He did what he felt was right. I told him what I thought."