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Your views on interracial marriages

Actress Eva Longoria Parker and basketball star Tony Parker were married in 2007.
Actress Eva Longoria Parker and basketball star Tony Parker were married in 2007.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • CNN.com readers have strong reactions to a story on race and marriage
  • A Pew Study finds a record of 1 in 7 newlywed relationships are interracial or interethnic
  • Thousand of CNN readers weigh in on the topic, mostly in support
  • Readers discuss their own experiences in an interracial or interethnic relationship
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(CNN) -- "Interracial/interethnic marriage is a great way of fighting war, hatred and prejudice. Think about it. If we all are mixed, who can we hate?" wrote a reader about a CNN.com story on race and marriage.

That comment was one of the thousands of responses to the story about a new study from the Pew Research Center that found interracial and interethnic marriages are at a record high of about one in seven.

About 14.6 percent of newly married couples reported in 2008 that they married outside their race or ethnicity, according to the Pew report released Friday. In 1980, about 6.8 percent of newlywed couples surveyed said their spouse was of another race or ethnicity.

Overall, reader reactions voiced support for mixed relationships, with many commenters proudly identifying themselves as being in an interracial or interethnic relationship.

"I've been happily married in a mixed race marriage for seven years. To anyone who would like to oppose mixed race marriage: What gives you the right? I pay taxes, served in the U.S. military (where I was disabled) and watched all kinds of races die in service to the pledge to protect every American's freedom. So as far as I'm concerned, blood only has one color: RED, and there's only one race: the human one," wrote BeerMan5000.

Reader RippedJeans, a black woman, talked about marrying her white boyfriend of three years. She wrote, "I could not be happier! I love him for the MAN that he is, and I'm truly grateful for having him in my life. Love is colorblind. ..."

Danchar821 was also in support of interracial marriages. Reflecting on her personal experience, Danchar821 wrote. "We met online through mutual friends. I went to Mexico every month last year and we were married. I could not be happier. There are cultural differences, but if anything, they have helped me to grow as a person. She is wonderful and so loving and I feel truly blessed and happy. The racism that some people show on here is truly sad. We are expecting our first child -- a boy -- in September."

Another couple talked about their wedding ceremony, which celebrated their cultural differences. Reader cellblock131 wrote, "I am Hispanic and married a white woman. ... When it came to our wedding, we had a mixture of both cultural practices. For example, my dad read passages in Spanish, then her dad read them in English. The reception had traditional white American dances, plus Mexican in the mix. It was a wonderful wedding."

One reader identified only as Guest said he won't date outside his race.

"I care what race the women I date are. I am a white male. I date only white females. Sure there are attractive women in other races but I stick with my own. It's America land of the free," wrote Guest.

AntigoneR ignores people's objections."I can only speak for myself, but I really don't care how many people accept or do not accept my interracial relationship. I don't recall asking their opinion. Having said that, I'm glad to see that the trend in society is more accepting, and that racial barriers are crumbling. I wish it were faster."

One commenter echoed a common view among the Millennial Generation, found in an earlier study this year from the Pew Center that reported 85 percent of 19- to 28-year-olds accept interracial and interethnic relationships. SIR10LY wrote: "It's 2010. I can't even believe this is still an issue! If two people love each other, let them be. ... If you're opposed to it, get with the times already!"

Children of mixed marriages also shared their views.

Reader Anex wrote, "Product of an Interracial marriage and darn proud of it! I'm a happy mutt!"

Other readers pointed to the challenges of marrying someone outside their race.

"But one thing the article does not mention is divorce among interracial couples is much higher than same-race couples. Challenges in understanding, family relations and pressures overall are higher. People should know what they're getting into," warned a reader.

WHATRU wrote, "I'm an Arab, my husband is white. It gets more complicated after you have kids. The cultures and beliefs are just too different. It is easier to marry your own kind."

Reader Toadlife wrote that racial discrimination can also be difficult. "Race matters because racial discrimination continues to happen all around us to this day. If you think otherwise, you are naive and probably white and have all white relatives. Thankfully, we've come to a point in our society where race is not a determining factor in one's fate, but it can still be an obstacle from time to time," Toadlife wrote.

Reader nal4america said her decision about whom to date is influenced by what race she grew up with. "I'm of West Indian decent and I grew up in a small town in Utah. I am so used to dating outside of my race that I don't even date men of my race simply because I am not attracted to them. I think the environment you grow up in plays a huge factor in the mate you select. I am 95 percent certain my husband will be of a race other than my own and that's fine because I believe in the American Race."

Native Americans had yet another take on the situation.

"... [T]here can never truly be justice and real harmony on stolen land ... just like there can never be peace and harmony in a house that's been burglarized and its inhabitants marginalized and oppressed ... ask an Apache or Navaho or black American if they are happy to live in a society dominated by white people. The indigenous were here for many thousands of years before the Europeans destroyed the culture and lands of the indigenous almost worldwide," wrote hotepk. "...What must happen is either they go back to Europe or pay restitution -- like any other convict guilty of a crime -- otherwise there will continue to be struggle."

Ndngirl2010 responded: @hotepk--I am full blooded Navajo and I'm fine with living alongside whites and get this --*gasp*-- I married one! A majority of my family doesn't harbor any animosity toward any other race. Let bygones be bygones and, instead, focus on the future."

The readers who responded to CNN's coverage on the Pew Research Center study seemed to acknowledge the growing blurring of races and ethnicities.

Reader HalfBaked shared: "My wife's biological mother is Filipino/Mexican and her biological father is Scottish. She was adopted at birth into a German-Jewish family. My mother's side is Italian/Turkish and my father was Hungarian. Our kids are about as 'mixed' as you can get."

 
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