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Parents of American killed in Israel in 2003 visit State Department

From Elise Labott, CNN Senior State Department Producer
Cindy Corrie, left, and husband Craig, adjacent, say they are seeking justice in their daughter's death in Gaza.
Cindy Corrie, left, and husband Craig, adjacent, say they are seeking justice in their daughter's death in Gaza.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Rachel Corrie was a peace activist working in Gaza, she died in 2003
  • Corrie was crushed by Israeli bulldozer
  • She was kneeling in front of a Palestinian home to prevent demolition
  • Israel said her death was accidental, bulldozer driver couldn't see her
RELATED TOPICS
  • Israel
  • Gaza

Washington (CNN) -- The parents of Rachel Corrie, an American killed by Israeli forces seven years ago, visited the State Department Wednesday as they continue to seek justice in their daughter's death.

Cindy and Craig Corrie met with Undersecretary William Burns, Assistant Secretary of State P.J. Crowley told reporters. The Corries have visited the State Department several times since their daughter's death in 2003, he said.

Rachel Corrie, a peace activist with the International Solidarity Movement, was crushed to death by an Israeli bulldozer in March 2003 in Gaza, while she was kneeling in front of a Palestinian home to prevent Israeli forces from demolishing it.

The Israeli Defense Forces claimed her death was accidental due to an obstructed view of the home by the bulldozer's driver. But that account has been disputed by eye witnesses and her death sparked international controversy and became a cause among Mideast peace activists.

Corrie's parents have sought to continue their daughter's work since her death, setting up a foundation promoting peace in the Mideast and trying to raise awareness of life for Palestinians in the Palestinian territories. They continue to push for an independent investigation into her death and have filed a lawsuit against the Israeli Defense Forces and Defense Ministry.

Crowley said the State Department continues to "offer assistance" to the Corries as the lawsuit progresses.

Their visit to Washington comes as the international community pushes Israel for an independent investigation into its May raid on a Turkish ship that was part of a Gaza aid flotilla. Nine Turkish activists were killed in the raid, which caused international outrage. Israel claims the flotilla was carrying armed members of a terrorist group.

Crowley on Wednesday urged Israel to conduct transparent investigations into both the flotilla incident and Corrie's death.

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