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U.S. diplomats meet with pro-democracy leader Suu Kyi

Kurt Campbell (left) and deputy Scot Marciel
Kurt Campbell (left) and deputy Scot Marciel
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Assistant Secretary of State Kurt Campbell and deputy Scot Marciel shown greeting Aung San Suu Kyi
  • Visit is part of a shift in U.S. policy toward the Southeast Asian country
  • Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, has been confined in her house for about 14 years
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(CNN) -- U.S. diplomats met with imprisoned pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi on Wednesday, Myanmar TV showed.

Assistant Secretary of State Kurt Campbell and deputy Scot Marciel were shown greeting her outside the Inya Lake Hotel in the former capital, Yangon, before they went inside for talks.

The American diplomats met with Myanmar's prime minister on Tuesday.

The visit is part of a shift in U.S. policy toward the Southeast Asian country that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announced in September, in which the United States would try to directly engage with the military leaders of Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, without abandoning existing sanctions.

Suu Kyi's detention has been a key point of contention between the United States and Myanmar. And critics have accused Myanmar's ruling junta of convicting Suu Kyi, 64, to keep her from participating in 2010 elections.

Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, has been confined in her house for about 14 of the past 20 years.

She was sentenced to another 18 months of house arrest after John Yettaw, an American man, swam uninvited to her home in Yangon.

In August, U.S. Sen. Jim Webb of Virginia flew to Myanmar to secure Yettaw's release and became the first American official to meet with junta leader Senior Gen. Than Shwe.

 
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