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Oregon cops make lost peacock feel most wanted

  • Story Highlights
  • Sheriff's department adopts lost bird, names it "Cynthia"
  • Sheriff "named her that because she looks like a Cynthia," spokeswoman says
  • Department figures exotic bird is someone's pet, but no one has claimed it
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From Chandler Friedman
CNN
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(CNN) -- The sheriff's office in Marion County, Oregon, has dealt with countless lost items in the past. This one is a little more special than most.

Cynthia the peahen patrols the grounds of the Marion County Sheriff's Department in Oregon.

Cynthia the peahen patrols the grounds of the Marion County Sheriff's Department in Oregon.

That lost item is a female Indian peacock, properly called a peahen. But to the sheriff's deputies, she's just Cynthia.

Why Cynthia?

"He [Sheriff Russ Isham] named her that because she looks like a Cynthia and he decided that she needed a name," said Lt. Sheila Lorance, a sheriff's office spokeswoman in the northwestern Oregon county.

Cynthia showed up Saturday on the property next to the sheriff's office and has spent most of her time eating bugs, drinking water from a nearby well and keeping watch over the department, Lorance said.

Officers initially asked several animal welfare agencies to take the bird, because she's an exotic animal and likely someone's pet. But each of the agencies refused to help.

Cynthia has been the focus of stories in the local newspaper and on television newscasts. Someone even showed up to drop off water for her.

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"We've been asking for anyone who knows the owner, but haven't had any luck. We have had two people call up wanting to adopt her," Lorance said.

In the short term, Cynthia has become a mascot for the police department. She spends her time camped outside the office, keeping an eye on things. The department would like to return Cynthia to her rightful owner, but for now it is content with having her nearby.

"I'd love to keep her," Lorance said. "I'd love to have her as a mascot, but the groundskeepers probably wouldn't appreciate having to clean up after her."

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