Skip to main content
Part of complete coverage on

A car that turns into a speedboat

By Anouk Lorie for CNN
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • WaterCar has designed what may be the world's fastest amphibious car
  • The $200,000 Python goes up to 60 mph in the water
  • Creator: "You can finally drive directly into the water and just keep on going"
RELATED TOPICS

London, England (CNN) -- California-born Dave March has always had a passion for cars and boats.

He started building and repairing them in 1976 when he opened a garage in sunny Fountain Valley, California.

But March wanted more than owning and working with the coolest cars and speedboats -- he dreamed of a great car that could go straight from the highway into the ocean: an amphibious car.

"In the late 1990s there were some amphibious cars on the market, but in the water they pretty much just floated," March told CNN. "What I wanted to do was to reach freeway speeds in water," he added.

March founded WaterCar Inc, and in 2006, released his first amphibious vehicle, the Python.

March claims it is the fastest amphibious car in the world.

It goes up to 60 mph in the water (52 nautical miles per hour) and on land goes from 0 to 60 mph in 12 seconds. By comparison, the high-end Ferrari California sports car hits just over 60 mph in around four seconds.

Video: The Water Car

Fitted with a Corvette engine and built to buyer specifications, Python's price starts at a cool $200,000.

"We wanted to keep it very exclusive," said March, who has so far sold the Python to a dozen people.

WaterCar has also developed a more affordable, Jeep-like water car: the Gator. Its starting price is $29,500 and it can go up to 8 mph on water and 85 mph on the road.

March says he now avoids traveling in any other way. "I went to Mexico last year with the Python, because most taxi cabs are so bad there," he said. "Having my own car was a pleasure and then I could put the car in the bay's water and go cruising."

March believes the amphibious car opens up a whole new dimension to people.

"The world is 75 percent water and owning a Gator or Python means you are no longer stuck to the land," he told CNN. "You can finally drive directly into the water and just keep on going."