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Opening wins for Australia, New Zealand

Michael Hussey, left center, and Marcus North celebrate as Australia take another wicket against the West Indies.
Michael Hussey, left center, and Marcus North celebrate as Australia take another wicket against the West Indies.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Australia crush the West Indies by an innings and 65 runs in opening Test in Brisbane
  • Debutant opener Adrian Barath became youngest West Indian to score a Test century
  • The tourists lost 15 wickets on Saturday to lose with more than two days left in match
  • New Zealand also take 1-0 series lead after beating Pakistan by 32 runs in Dunedin
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(CNN) -- Australia crushed the West Indies by an innings and 65 runs in the opening Test in Brisbane, while New Zealand also took a 1-0 lead in the series against Pakistan with a tense final-day victory.

Debutant opener Adrian Barath became the youngest West Indian cricket player to score a Test century on Saturday, but the tourists capitulated to be all out for 187 to lose with two days to spare as Australia captain Ricky Ponting enforced the follow-on.

Resuming on 134-5, the Windies crumbled to be all out for 228 in their first innings as left-arm seamer Mitchell Johnson and spinner Nathan Hauritz both finished with three wickets, while late call-up Travis Dowlin top-scored with 62.

Opening bowler Ben Hilfenhaus then followed up his two-wicket bag to claim 3-20 from his first seven-over spell after lunch, getting rid of senior batsmen Chris Gayle (1) and Shivnarine Chanderpaul (2).

At the other end, the 19-year-old Barath -- who made just 15 in the first innings -- blasted away to crash 19 boundaries.

When he was trapped leg before wicket by Shane Watson to be the sixth man out, he had made 104 of his team's 154 runs from just 138 deliveries faced.

We might as well just go with the two umpires in the middle and leave it as is, whether they get it wrong or right
--Chris Gayle

The last four wickets tumbled in just 10 overs, with Hauritz ending with another two as the West Indies crashed to a ninth successive defeat in Australia.

Gayle was quick to criticize the new decision referral system which has been introduced, having failed to overturn lbw dismissals in both his innings.

"The technology is always there, but sometimes mistakes are still made even with the technology -- that's why I'm not a big fan of it," he told reporters.

"We might as well just go with the two umpires in the middle and leave it as is, whether they get it wrong or right."

But Ponting backed the system, even though his team had not profited from it with some decisions.

"It's always going to be good for the game -- whether or not every one is right is irrelevant," he said. "We end up getting more correct decisions made in the game.

"I think we used ours pretty well. They probably referred a couple that were wrong. I think the umpires did a great job themselves and the referral system worked well as well."

Meanwhile, Shane Bond celebrated his return to Test cricket with a clinical spell of pace bowling on the final day in Dunedin to give New Zealand a 32-run victory against Pakistan.

The Kiwis lost their last two wickets for just eight runs on the final morning to be all out for 153 to set a target of 251.

Bond, playing his first five-day match since 2007 after being outcast for joining the unofficial Indian Cricket League, took five wickets in Pakistan's first innings of 332 and claimed another three as the tourists were all out for 218.

He struck twice as Pakistan teetered at 24-3 and then came back to dismiss first-innings centurian Umar Akmal for 75 when the debutant had threatened to give Pakistan victory before falling at 195-6.

Captain Daniel Vettori then claimed two wickets with his left-arm spin while seamer Iain O'Brien took 3-63 despite dislocating a finger to help mop up the tail.