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Pakistan shatter Dutch Twenty20 dream

  • Story Highlights
  • Pakistan power into Super Eights stage of the Twenty20 World Cup
  • They shattered Dutch qualifying dream with victory by 82 runs at Lord's
  • The Netherlands had humiliated hosts England in the opening match
  • South African beat New Zealand by one run with both sides qualified
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(CNN) -- Pakistan powered into the Super Eights stage of the Twenty20 World Cup at Lord's on Tuesday when they shattered the Dutch qualifying dream.

Shahid Afridi of Pakistan celebrates the wicket of Daan van Bunge of Netherlands with Kamran Akmal.

Shahid Afridi of Pakistan celebrates the wicket of Daan van Bunge of Netherlands with Kamran Akmal.

The Netherlands had humiliated hosts England in the opening match of the tournament last Friday when they scored a shock four wickets victory at the home of cricket.

But Dutch ambitions of taking the scalp of another Test-playing nation proved a dream too far as they succumbed by 82 runs.

Faced with a 176-run victory target, the Dutch began their chase knowing reaching 151 would be enough to send them into the second stage alongside England, due to their superior net run rate.

But Jeroen Smits' predominantly amateur side capitulated to Pakistan spinners Saeed Ajmal and Salim Malik and all-rounder Shahid Afridi, in particular, during a spell of seven wickets for 32 runs in just six overs.

They looked comfortable at 42 for one when Afridi was introduced into the attack for the eighth over and he highlighted the gulf in class when he produced a yorker first ball which fizzed under the bat of Bas Zuiderent.

Unable to get the spinners away, the middle-order batsmen then fell in quick succession to shots of increasing desperation.

Tim de Grooth, hero of the opening night chase against England with an aggressive 49, was one of the quartet to perish to Afridi, who finished with figures of 4-0-11-4.

There was much greater intent from the Pakistanis less than 48 hours after their poor showing against England at The Oval, but they were restricted by a disciplined Dutch effort with the ball.

Led by the impressive left-armer Dirk Nannes, who clocked the fastest delivery of the tournament during the innings, they restricted the Pakistanis to 50 for one during the powerplay period.

But there was a sting in the tail. Experienced duo Younis Khan and Misbah-ul-Haq shared a half-century stand for Pakistan whose final flourish of 60 runs from the final five overs left the Dutch with too much to do.

South Africa kept their composure to defeat New Zealand by one run at Lord's in a dour Group D dead rubber with both sides already qualified for the Super Eights.

Despite posting just 128 for seven, the Proteas attack kept their discipline on a sluggish surface to negate the effect of Brendon McCullum's half-century.

The worn pitch restricted the boundary count, particularly once the new ball lost its original hardness, and although the Black Caps only lost five wickets, they were stifled by spin in mid-innings.

Injury-hit New Zealand somehow allowed the equation to slip to 36 runs required from the final three overs and although that was reduced to four off the last ball, Jacob Oram drove to long-on and was run out coming back for an ambitious third.

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