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Bill Clinton to address Senate Democrats on health care

Bill Clinton will talk to Senate Democrats on Tuesday, two senior Democratic sources tell CNN.
Bill Clinton will talk to Senate Democrats on Tuesday, two senior Democratic sources tell CNN.
STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Clinton will attend Senate Democrats' weekly luncheon Tuesday, sources tell CNN
  • Clinton will push message that failure to pass health bill will have election consequences
  • House of Representatives passed health care bill over the weekend
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(CNN) -- CNN has learned from two senior Democratic sources that former President Bill Clinton will attend the Senate Democrats' weekly luncheon Tuesday to address the caucus about health care.

A notice obtained by CNN went out to Senate Democrats saying, "All Senators should be aware that former President Clinton will be making a presentation on Health Care at tomorrow's caucus lunch. Senator Reid has requested that all Democratic Senators attend."

A constant refrain from Democratic leaders is that wavering Democrats must heed what they say is a lesson of the Clinton administration: fail to pass a health care reform bill, and congressional Democrats will suffer on Election Day.

With this visit at a critical time for health care in the Senate, the former president will be able to deliver that message in person.

Democrats in the House of Representatives approved a health care bill over the weekend.

If the Senate passes a bill, a congressional conference committee will need to merge the House and Senate proposals into a consensus version requiring final approval from each chamber before moving to President Obama's desk to be signed into law.

The House bill is more expansive -- and hence more expensive -- than the Senate Finance Committee bill. The House bill, projected to guarantee coverage for 96 percent of Americans, will cost more than $1 trillion over the next 10 years, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office.

CNN's Dana Bash, Brianna Keilar,Ted Barrett and Alan Silverleib contributed to this report.

 
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