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Web site seeks donations to help O.J. Simpson appeal conviction

  • Story Highlights
  • Web site says former football star, actor was railroaded
  • O.J. Simpson was sentenced in December for robbery, kidnapping
  • Jury found that Simpson, others robbed men in Nevada hotel room
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(CNN) -- A new Web site is seeking donations to help free O.J. Simpson, who it says was wrongly convicted of robbery and kidnapping.

O.J. Simpson was sentenced in December to a maximum of 33 years in prison; he could get out in nine.

O.J. Simpson was sentenced in December to a maximum of 33 years in prison; he could get out in nine.

Creators of the site say the controversial former football star was railroaded by a "kangaroo court" in Las Vegas, Nevada, last year.

Simpson was sentenced in December to a maximum of 33 years for his role in an armed confrontation with sports memorabilia dealers in a hotel in 2007, and he'll be eligible for parole in nine years.

The Web site, run by a group called the Society Against Legal Injustice, says Simpson's case was mishandled and he deserves an appeal. The group lists what it calls errors in the case, including the contention that Simpson was targeted because of his controversial acquittal in the killings of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her companion Ronald Goldman in 1995.

The group put the price tag for an appeal at $1 million.

"The unfairness levied against O.J. Simpson in Las Vegas is something no citizen deserves," the site says. "O.J. Simpson is not a wealthy man anymore and is therefore largely at the mercy of the Las Vegas legal system."

The group says its goal is "to educate, promote and advocate against judicial discrimination." But the only case the nonprofit organization highlights on the site is Simpson's.

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Prosecutors said Simpson led a group of men who used threats, guns and force to take sports memorabilia from dealers Bruce Fromong and Al Beardsley.

Simpson claimed he was trying to recover items that belonged to him. Most of the co-defendants in the case made deals with prosecutors in exchange for testifying against Simpson.

The two-member board of directors listed on the Web site could not be reached immediately for comment.

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