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Medical team among 10 killed in plane crash

  • Story Highlights
  • Twin-engine plane crashed after takeoff from Moab, Utah, airport
  • Nine victims were with Southwest Skin and Cancer, family member says
  • Group provides cancer screening and treatment to Southwest communities
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(CNN) -- Ten people, including nine members of a medical team, were killed in the crash of a small plane at an airport in the southeastern Utah town of Moab, authorities said Saturday.

The crash occurred about 5:55 p.m. (7:55 p.m. ET) Friday as the plane was taking off from Moab's Canyonlands Air Field, Grand County Sheriff Jim Nyland said.

The plane was fully engulfed in flames when emergency responders arrived at the site about 2 miles from the airport, Nyland told CNN affiliate KUTV.

The National Transportation Safety Board said the plane was a Beech A100 King Air.

The victims were all from Cedar City, Utah, Nyland said. They included pilot David White, doctor Lansing Ellsworth and eight others from Southwest Skin and Cancer, according to a joint statement issued by the Ellsworth family and the Leavitt Group, which owned the plane. Video Watch site of plane crash »

The group "had traveled to Moab early that day to provide cancer screening, cancer treatment and other medical services to citizens in Moab," the statement said. Southwest Skin and Cancer also served nine other communities in Utah, Arizona and Nevada.

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A company called Leavitt Group Wings worked with Southwest Skin and Cancer under a time-sharing agreement, enabling the medical team to serve rural communities, the statement said.

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"They provided much needed dermatology care to patients who might have otherwise gone without," said the Ellsworth family, who lost two members in the crash, in a statement.

It was unclear what caused the crash. Investigators from agencies including the National Transportation Safety Board were en route, Nyland said.

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