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The CNN Wire: Monday, Nov. 5

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Editor's Note: The CNN Wire is a running log of the latest news from CNN World Headquarters, reported by CNN's correspondents and producers, and The CNN Wire editors. "Posted" times are Eastern Time.

Pakistani forces brutally enforce emergency measure; thousands arrested

LAHORE, Pakistan (CNN) -- Pakistani security forces used tear gas and batons Monday on lawyers and journalists demonstrating against President Pervez Musharraf's weekend declaration of a state of emergency in Pakistan.

Thousands of journalists, attorneys, opposition figures and human rights representatives have been jailed in the crackdown that began Saturday when Musharraf declared the state of emergency, suspending the country's constitution and sparking the demonstrations.

Across the country, police stations are so packed with detainees that authorities have begun using schools as temporary holding cells.

Despite strong pressure from the United States, Britain and other countries to reverse his decision, Musharraf has been unresponsive and unapologetic, according to diplomatic officials who met Monday with the president to deliver their concerns, particularly about "heavy-handed" measures taken in Lahore.

According to a press release from Musharraf, "The president assured the diplomats that efforts were being made in a phased manner to move toward complete democracy." (Posted 9:25 p.m.)

ICE chief apologizes for Halloween costume party

From CNN's Jeanne Meserve and Mike Ahlers:

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The Secretary of Homeland Security says DHS will conduct an inquiry into a Halloween costume party hosted by a top immigration official after some employees said they were offended by a man dressed in striped prison outfit, dreadlocks and darkened skin make-up.

Julie Myers, head of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and host of the fundraising party, was on a three-judge panel that originally cited the prisoner costume for "originality." Myers later apologized for "a few of the costumes," calling them "inappropriate and offensive." She said she and other senior managers "deeply regret that this happened."

A department photographer photographed Myers with the man, but the photograph or photographs were deleted after it was determined the costume was offensive, ICE spokeswoman Kelly Nantel said.

Between 50 and 75 people attended the party, which was a fundraiser for the Combined Federal Campaign, a federal government collection of charities. (Posted 9:21 p.m.)

Report: Weak security mistakenly lets thousands cross U.S. border

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Despite heightened attention to border security in the six years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, government watchdogs have found that thousands of people who shouldn't have been admitted to the United States were mistakenly allowed in last year because of security lapses at legal border crossings.

The number of inadmissible aliens who managed to enter through official ports of entry in 2006 was not disclosed in Monday's report from the Government Accountability Office. However, a source who has seen a full version of the report, in which those statistics were included, put the total at 21,000.

The author of the GAO report, Richard Stana, said most of those who were wrongly allowed to enter were economic migrants who did not present a security risk.

Understaffing and turnover at Customs and Border Protection, the agency which mans the nation's 326 land, sea and air ports of entry, has contributed to the problem, according to the GAO report. However, investigators also cited weak management controls and complacency and inattentiveness by some CBP officers. (Posted 7:49 p.m.)

Federal monitors dispatched to 4 states for local elections

From Justice Producer Terry Frieden

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- More than one hundred federal civil rights monitors have been dispatched from Washington to cities in four states to keep an eye on polling locations Tuesday where language barriers and race-related problems have occurred in past local elections.

The Justice Department said monitors have been sent to Boston and Springfield, Mass., and to Reading, Pa., because of ballot issues and language assistance.

A federal court order entered in Boston in 2005 required the city to provide information, ballots, and voting assistance in Spanish, Chinese and Vietnamese. In Springfield, a 2006 court order required voting assistance and materials for Spanish-speaking voters. Spanish language voting access is also the issue in Reading.

Federal observers were also sent to Anderson, Ind., and to five counties in Mississippi where racial issues have flared in past local elections. (Posted 7:41 p.m.)

Defense contractor convicted of bribing ex-congressman Cunningham

(CNN) -- A federal jury in San Diego convicted defense contractor Brent Wilkes of bribing imprisoned ex-congressman Randy "Duke" Cunningham on Monday, taking three days of deliberations to find Wilkes guilty on 13 corruption counts.

Wilkes was accused of providing more than $700,000 to Cunningham in exchange for the southern California Republican's help steering more than $70 million in defense contracts to Wilkes and another contractor, Mitchell Wade. Jurors began deliberating Wednesday after a three-week trial, finding Wilkes guilty of bribery, conspiracy, money laundering and 10 counts of wire fraud, assistant U.S. attorney Phillip Halpern said.

Prosecutors accused Wilkes of paying off a half-million-dollar note on the congressman's California home; picking up the tab for vacation outings, private jet travel and limousines; buying Cunningham a $14,000 speedboat; and having an employee line up prostitutes for himself and the lawmaker during a two-night stay in Hawaii.

Wilkes could face up to 20 years in prison at sentencing, which Halpern said has been set for Jan. 28. His lawyers did not immediately respond to a request for comment on the verdict. (Posted 7:10 p.m.)

U.S. Air Force grounds fighters operating in Afghanistan

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A mandatory grounding of Air Force F-15s has been expanded to cover those flying combat missions over Afghanistan after a crash in Missouri last week, Air Force officials said Monday.

The F-15Es in Afghanistan can fly only in emergency situations to protect U.S. and coalition troops in a battle, according to Maj. John Elolf, a spokesman for the U.S. Air Force Central Command.

On Saturday, the Air Force grounded all models of its F-15 fleet on "non-mission critical" flight status for inspection after the crash of an older model F-15C Friday. The cause of the crash is still under investigation, but Air Force officials said it was a structural failure and the plane broke apart in flight.

Grounding the planes flying over Afghanistan moves the inspections to now cover "mission critical" F-15s. --From CNN Pentagon Producer Mike Mount (Posted 5:27 p.m.)

Writers on both coasts participate on first day of WGA strike

(CNN) -- Late-night television shows readied themselves Monday for reruns as movie and television writers manned picket lines on both sides of the country on the first day of the Writers Guild of America's strike against studios and production companies.

Comedian and late-night talk show host Jay Leno, carrying donuts to the dozens of pickets marching outside of NBC's studios in Burbank, Calif., told reporters that he wouldn't cross the picket line.

Earlier on Monday, his show, as well as several other late-night shows -- among them "Late Night with Conan O'Brien," "The Late Show with David Letterman," and "The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson" -- announced they will be showing reruns "until further notice."

Additionally, "The Daily Show" and "The Colbert Report" will begin showing reruns Monday night, said Comedy Central's vice president, Steve Albani. (Posted 4:47 p.m.)

U.S. to aid crackdown on Kurdish 'enemy' in Iraq, Bush tells Turkish PM

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The United States will help Iraq and Turkey crack down on Kurdish separatists in northern Iraq, President Bush said Monday after meeting with Turkey's prime minister, telling reporters that U.S. and Turkish commanders will share intelligence on the rebels.

With Turkey threatening to launch cross-border raids against the Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK, Bush pointed to the weekend release of 12 Turkish soldiers captured by the rebels as evidence that a crackdown is under way.

"I've assured the prime minister that we're working very carefully and closely with people in the Kurdish part of Iraq to help deal with the movement of these people, to help locate and find and stop the leadership of the PKK from continuing doing what they're doing," he said.

The United States and the European Union consider the group a terrorist organization, and Bush called it "an enemy of Turkey, a free Iraq and the United States of America." He said top U.S. and Turkish military officials have set up an arrangement to keep in touch with each other and with the U.S. commander in Baghdad, Gen. David Petraeus. (Posted 4:18 p.m.)

Top former general breaks with Chavez over constitutional changes

CARACAS, Venezuela (CNN) -- The ex-general credited with helping President Hugo Chavez turn the tide during an abortive coup in 2002 broke with his former mentor Monday, saying that Chavez's proposed constitutional changes would themselves represent a coup d'etat against the constitutional system.

Approval of the proposed changes "would in effect finalize a coup d'etat, brazenly violating the constitution," former Defense Minister Raul Baduel said at a news conference. "The Venezuelan people should categorically reject this fraud."

Venezuela's pro-Chavez National Assembly on Friday overwhelmingly approved a package of 69 changes to the 1999 Constitution. The changes would institutionalize Chavez's bid to implant a new model of development -- called "Socialism for the 21st Century" -- in the country while strengthening the power of the executive to rule by decree. It would also change electoral rules and allow a sitting president to seek unlimited re-election -- grandfathering Chavez into that system. (Posted 4:08 p.m.)

Center-left Colom wins Guatemala's presidential race

GUATEMALA CITY (CNN) -- Alvaro Colom of the center-left National Union of Hope party was declared Monday the official victor in Sunday's presidential election.

"God was with Sandrita and me," said Colom late Sunday night, referring to his wife Sandra. "Thanks to the Guatemalan people for making this civic holiday such a marvelous day."

It was the 56-year-old industrial engineer's third try for the presidency and his first to succeed.

Of the 2.7 million valid votes cast nationwide, Colom won 1.4 million (53 percent) versus 1.3 million (47 percent) for his challenger, retired Gen. Otto Perez Molina of the conservative Patriot Party, according to the nation's official Web site, which said 100 percent of the vote had been counted. (Posted 3:04 p.m.)

Young environmental activists hit Capitol Hill on climate change

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Hundreds of young people are urging Congress to push the United States ahead in fighting global climate change, encouraged by several lawmakers Monday who addressed their rally on the west lawn of the U.S. Capitol.

"The young people of America are coming to Washington to say they want action now," said Rep. Ed Markey, D-Mass., after he accepted a symbolic box of petitions of support for environmental and energy bills. "They're walking the corridors, they're lobbying the House and Senate, and I think they're making a big difference."

The House and Senate in coming weeks will vote on the Safe Climate Act and the Global Warming Reduction Act, among other bills. Lawmakers will also consider a proposal to tighten the provisions of the Clean Water Act that were relaxed during the Bush administration. --From CNN's Paul Courson (Posted 2:50 p.m.)

Thompson adviser resigns after drug pleas disclosed

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A friend and adviser to Republican presidential candidate Fred Thompson resigned from the campaign Monday after weekend news reports disclosed his more than 20-year-old drug convictions.

Phillip Martin stepped down as chairman of the First Day Founders committee for Thompson after The Washington Post reported his record Sunday, Martin told CNN. The former Tennessee senator's campaign has paid him more than $100,000 for use of a private jet, the newspaper reported.

"The focus of this campaign should be on Fred Thompson's positions on the issues and his outstanding leadership ability, not on mistakes I made some 24 years ago. I deeply regret any embarrassment this has caused," Martin said in a statement issued Monday.

The Post reported Sunday that Martin had pleaded guilty to selling marijuana in 1979 and pleaded no contest to cocaine-trafficking charges in 1983. He received probation both times. (Posted 2:43 p.m.)

Time Warner CEO Parsons to step aside; will keep chairmanship

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- After a more than five-year stint running media conglomerate Time Warner, chairman and chief executive officer Richard Parsons announced Monday that he will resign as CEO as of Jan. 1.

The company said Parsons is turning over the CEO reins to Jeffrey Bewkes, currently the president and chief operating officer of Time Warner. Parsons will remain chairman.

The announcement has been long-expected as Parsons' contract with Time Warner expires in May 2008.

Time Warner, in addition to being the parent company of CNN and CNNMoney.com, owns the Warner Bros. movie studio, Internet company AOL and a majority stake in Time Warner Cable. (Posted 2:24 p.m.)

Bush, Turkish PM discuss Iraq border crisis

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Turkey's prime minister arrived at the White House on Monday for talks with President Bush on the border crisis with Iraq, an effort to prevent a Turkish assault on Kurdish rebels based across the Iraqi frontier.

NATO ally Turkey has put tens of thousands of troops along the border after a series of attacks by the Kurdistan Workers Party, or PKK, that have killed dozens of Turkish troops and civilians. The Turkish parliament has authorized cross-border raids against the PKK, but Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan had said he would stay any decision until after his talks with Bush.

The Bush administration is offering to share intelligence on the rebels for "limited and targeted exercises" by Turkey, White House spokesman Dana Perino said Monday.

"We agree the PKK are terrorists and they should be stopped," she said. (Posted 2:20 p.m.)

Researcher: Dangerous cholesterol drug's effectiveness demands attention

ORLANDO (CNNMoney.com) -- A researcher unveiled Monday the results of a failed Pfizer Inc. study showing that an experimental but dangerous cholesterol drug offers medical benefits too significant to be ignored.

The drug, torcetrapib, which Pfizer discontinued last year because too many patients died in the study, was nonetheless very effective in controlling cholesterol levels, said Dr. Phillip Barter, lead researcher in the study and professor of the Heart Research Institute in Sydney, Australia.

The dangers associated with torcetrapib were already well-known, but its benefits had not been disclosed in detail before Monday. The test results could reignite interest in this class of drugs, known as cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors and is of great significance to other companies as well as Pfizer. --By CNNMoney.com's Aaron Smith (Posted 1:50 p.m.)

Rice believes Israeli-Palestinian moving toward peace negotiations

RAMALLAH, West Bank (CNN) -- U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, in the Middle East again to help restart peace negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians, said Monday she is "tremendously impressed" by the resolve of both sides to find solutions to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

At a news conference with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, Rice said she believes a proposed summit in Annapolis later this year can be the start of productive bargaining toward a two-state solution.

"We appear to be on course to prepare seriously for continuous ongoing negotiations between the Palestinians and Israelis for the establishment of a Palestinian state for the first time in many years, in seven years. We need to focus to make certain that everything that we do creates the best possible atmosphere for the day after Annapolis as well as for Annapolis," said Rice.

While Israel and the Palestinians have not yet settled on a pre-conference declaration of principals and no date has been set for the Annapolis conference, Rice expressed optimism that both sides are finding common ground. (Posted 1:33 p.m.)

Pakistani opposition leader Imran Khan says he has escaped from house arrest

LAHORE, Pakistan (CNN) -- Pakistani opposition leader Imran Khan said Monday that he has escaped from house arrest and has no intention of turning himself in.

"I will continue with my movement," Khan told Pakistani independent network GEO-TV from an undisclosed location. "The government has a very clear plan, the way they have beaten up the lawyers and arrested people and the way they barged into my house.

"They want to create fear and chaos."

Khan, a former captain of the Pakistani cricket team, heads the Movement for Justice party, which campaigns for an independent judiciary in Pakistan. He had been confined to his home in Lahore since early Sunday, when uniformed and plainclothes police surrounded the building and informed him he was under house arrest. (Posted 1:05 p.m.)

Taiwanese fishing boat freed by Somali pirates

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A third ship hijacked by Somali pirates was released Monday, the U.S. Navy said.

The Ching Fong Hwa, a Taiwanese fishing boat, and its crew, most of whom are Chinese, had been held alongside two other boats, which were released on Sunday, the Navy said.

The Navy said that after the boat and its crew were released, a Somali boat picked up the pirates and returned them to Somalia. The USS James E. William then escorted the Hwa from the area. Navy sailors from the William boarded the Hwa to evaluate the crew and provide any needed aid.

The Hwa was pirated in late April or early May, according to the Navy, which added that two ships in the area remain under pirate control. (Posted 12:25 p.m.)

Writers demonstrate in New York on first day of WGA strike

NEW YORK (CNN) -- Dozens of writers picketed Monday morning outside NBC studios in Rockefeller Plaza, carrying signs and yelling, on the first day of the Writers Guild of America's strike against studios and production companies.

The writers' union says the strike, which began at 12:01 a.m. PT (3:01 a.m. ET), is necessary to protect their future incomes as the shows they write are increasingly distributed over new media, primarily through Internet downloading. A last-day effort to reach a new work agreement collapsed Sunday night despite the writers conceding a demand for a doubling of how much they are paid for DVD sales. This had been considered the major stumbling block to a deal.

The union's statement early Monday morning said that while it chose to withdraw its DVD proposal -- which they say would have doubled writers' residuals -- the studios and production companies were still insisting on a framework concerning Internet distribution that "makes a mockery of any residual," the statement said.

AMPTP President Nick Counter placed the blamed for the failed talks on the negotiators for the writers."We made an attempt at meeting them in a number of their key areas, including Internet streaming and jurisdiction in new media," he said. (Posted noon)

2 killed in Baghdad roadside bombing

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- A roadside bomb in southeastern Baghdad on Monday killed at least two Iraqis and wounded six, an Iraqi Interior Ministry official said.

The incident occurred in the predominantly Shiite Zafaraniya district just after 7 p.m. The bombing appears to have been targeting a police patrol, the official said.

Police and civilians were among the casualties. (Posted 11:46 a.m.)

More detainees released from U.S. prisons in Iraq

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- Iraqi Vice President Tariq al-Hashimi announced the release of 283 Iraqi detainees from U.S. detention facilities in Iraq over the past week, the presidency council press office said Monday.

A total of 683 detainees have been released since mid-October, it said.

It's part of a campaign led by al-Hashimi to push for release of detainees who were being unfairly held.

The effort was launched during the holy month of Ramadan. --From CNN's Jomana Karadsheh (Posted 11:44 a.m.)

Boats freed by pirates were fishing trawlers

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The U.S. Navy on Monday identified two Tanzanian-flagged fishing boats that were released Sunday by pirates off the east coast of Somalia as Mavuno I and Mavuno II.

The trawlers were pirated in May.

They were to meet with a U.S. Navy ship, which was to provide escort and humanitarian assistance to the crews, the Navy said.

In all, 24 sailors of various nationalities were freed Sunday, about six months after pirates took over their ships, a U.S. military official told CNN. (Posted 11:43 a.m.)

Pentagon postpones military meeting with Pakistan

WASHINGTON (CNN) --- The Pentagon has postponed a meeting scheduled this week in Pakistan between top U.S. and Pakistani military and defense officials, in what appears to be the first step in a new cooler relationship with Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf.

Pentagon spokesman Bryan Whitman confirmed the postponement of the meeting scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday and indicated no new date has been set. Undersecretary of Defense Eric Edelman, the top U.S. defense policy official, had been planning to represent the United States at the meeting of the bilateral defense consultative group.

Separately, a Pentagon official confirmed that "over half" of all U.S. military logistics and supplies for the war in Afghanistan come through Pakistan, so access is vital, the official said.

Whitman also confirmed the United States is reviewing all elements of military and security aid to Pakistan and no decisions have been made. (Posted 11:38 a.m.)

Bush to address Pakistan situation

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- President Bush is expected to voice his concerns about Pakistani President Gen. Pervez Musharraf's recent declaration of a state of emergency when the U.S. leader addresses reporters at the White House on Monday, White House Press Secretary Dana Perino said.

Bush is expected to comment on the Pakistan situation after a scheduled Oval Office meeting this afternoon with Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, according to Perino.

In an off-camera morning briefing, Perino told reporters the United States is "deeply disturbed by the proclamation of emergency in Pakistan."

She said Washington "cannot support emergency rule or the extreme measures taken during the emergency." (Posted 11:02 a.m.)

Bayer suspends marketing of clotting drug used in heart surgery

(CNN) -- Bayer Pharmaceuticals Corp. announced Monday it has suspended marketing of a clotting drug used to prevent bleeding in heart surgery.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it requested the suspension pending a review of preliminary results from a Canadian study that suggested the drug, Trasylol, is linked to an increased risk of dying.

"FDA requested the suspension in the interest of patient safety based on the serious nature of the outcomes suggested in the preliminary data," the agency said in a posting on its Web site. "FDA has not yet received full study data but expects to act quickly with Bayer, the study's researchers at the Ottawa Health Research Institute, and other regulatory agencies to undertake a thorough analysis of data to better understand the risks and benefits of Trasylol."

Since there are few treatment options for patients at risk for major bleeding during heart surgery, the FDA said it is working with Bayer to phase out use of Trasylol so that supplies of other drugs approved for that purpose do not run out. (Posted 10:58 a.m.)

Demonstrators in London call for end to Pakistan emergency

LONDON (CNN) -- About 120 demonstrators gathered in front of the Pakistani High Commission in London Monday to protest against an emergency declaration by Pakistani President Pervez Musharraf.

Students and professionals held banners calling for Musharraf to resign and chanted for an end to the state of emergency he announced Saturday.

Dressed in business suits, the protesters stood behind metal barriers across the street from the commission in central London. They waved banners with slogans including "Go Musharraf Go" and "Down With Martial Law," and held up pictures of the president with the message "Leading War Against The Judiciary."

"We have one major demand which is: Musharraf back off now and release civil society people -- human rights activists and lawyers -- immediately," Hina Jilani, the head of the British branch of the Pakistani Human Rights Commission, told CNN from outside the commission. (Posted 10:31 a.m.)

Bush to address Pakistan situation

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- President Bush is expected to address the situation in Pakistan on Monday, White House Press Secretary Dana Perino told reporters.

The exact time of the Oval Office address has not been set, but will take place sometime after he meets with Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan at 1:15 p.m. -- From CNN's Elaine Quijano (Posted 10:21 a.m.)

Iraqi Red Crescent reports hike in monthly displaced numbers

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- The number of internally displaced people in Iraq rose sharply in September, with two-thirds of this growing population comprising young children, and most being in the Baghdad area, according to a report by the humanitarian group Iraqi Red Crescent Organization.

The organization said in a report issued on Sunday that 2,299,425 people were displaced by the end of September, about a 19 percent increase from the August figure of 1,930,946. The numbers represent a steady monthly increase this year.

"Children less than 12 years comprised more than 65 percent of the total number. The majority of the displaced people (63.6 percent) were in Baghdad governorate," the report said. The percentage of women is 18.6 percent.

The percentage of child IDPs has risen since August from 51.3 percent. The displacement problems in Iraq is considered the worst in the Middle East since the population changes spurred by the 1948 creation of Israel. (Posted 9:44 a.m.)

'Devastated' Winfrey praises students after abuse allegations

JOHANNESBURG, S. Africa (CNN) -- U.S. talk show host Oprah Winfrey said Monday that allegations of abuse at her South African girls school are "devastating" but she is proud of the students who reported it, saying "their lights will not be diminished by this experience."

Winfrey spoke via satellite link from Chicago to address media in Johannesburg hours after a 27-year-old school matron was charged with 13 counts of abuse and assault at Winfrey's $40 million academy, which opened in January.

Winfrey appeared at the news conference with a police superintendent and the school's chief executive.

"This has been one of the most devastating, if not the most devastating, experience of my life," Winfrey said. "But like all such experiences, there is always much to be gained and I think there's a lot to be learned." (Posted 9:28 a.m.)

Top U.S. military official warned Pakistani leader before emergency declaration

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Twenty-four hours before Pakistan's president declared a state of emergency, the head of the U.S. Central Command met with Pervez Musharraf in Pakistan and told him that the United States did not support such an action, Adm. William Fallon confirmed to CNN in an exclusive interview.

"I told him the idea of doing this was not a good one and that there might be alternatives," Fallon said in a phone interview from Kyrgyzstan.

"I gave him my opinion about the potential consequences and the likely reactions."

Musharraf did not directly inform Fallon of his decision during their meeting on Friday, but it was clear what he planned to do, according to senior U.S. officials familiar with what was said in the meeting. --From CNN Pentagon Correspondent Barbara Starr (Posted 9:27 a.m.)

Head of MI5 says 2,000 people in Britain a threat to security, people as young as 15 involved in terror-related activity

LONDON (CNN) -- The head of Britain's intelligence services warned Monday there are at least 2,000 people living in Britain who pose a threat to the country's security because of their support for al Qaida-inspired terrorism.

Jonathan Evans, the chief of MI5, said that individuals as young as 15 are being implicated in terrorist-related activity, during a speech to journalists.

"As I speak, terrorists are methodically and intentionally targeting young people and children in this country. They are radicalizing, indoctrinating and grooming young, vulnerable people to carry out acts of terrorism," he told a gathering of newspaper editors in Manchester.

Evans said the figure of 2,000 -- an increase of 400 since November 2006 -- includes only those the intelligence services knows about; the actual number could be double. He said there have been 200 terrorist convictions in Britain since the September 11 attacks. (Posted 9:10 a.m.)

Pakistani forces brutally enforce emergency measure; thousands arrested

LAHORE, Pakistan (CNN) -- The jails are overflowing in Pakistan with thousands of lawyers, opposition figures, and journalists as Pakistani forces try to keep the lid on civil unrest following President Pervez Musharraf's declaration of a state of emergency over the weekend.

Monday's crackdown turned violent in several cities, including Lahore, where police -- using tear gas and batons -- clashed with lawyers and journalists outside the city's courthouse.

As they did in widespread protests earlier this year, Pakistan's lawyers are leading the charge against Musharraf's latest move to squash any attempt by the Supreme Court to limit his grip on power.

Pakistani forces hauled in 1,200 lawyers in Lahore alone, and more than 300 in Faisalabad and Karachi, according to police figures. (Posted 9:04 a.m.)

Britain calls on Pakistan to release all poltical prisoners

LONDON (CNN) -- Britain called Monday on Pakistan's government to release all political prisoners detained since the beginning of a state of emergency.

Political opposition figures have been rounded up across Pakistan since Saturday's declaration by President Pervez Musharraf, including more than 60 members of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto's Pakistan People's Party, a senior police official said.

A spokesman for Prime Minister Gordon Brown told CNN Britain is reviewing the implications for its development and assistance programs to Pakistan in the light of the emergency declaration. The British government is committted to providing .236 million ($493 million) in aid to Pakistan over the next three years. (Posted 8:18 a.m.)

U.S., Iraqi troops launch 'major offensive' in northern Iraq

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- U.S. and Iraqi troops "launched a major offensive" on Monday in four northern Iraqi provinces, the U.S. military said.

The effort is taking place in Diyala, Salaheddin, Nineveh and Tameem provinces and "is designed to exploit previous successes against al Qaeda and set the conditions for continued reconciliation efforts" in the region."

The operation, called Iron Hammer, is led by Task Force Iron and includes at least three brigade combat teams and three Iraqi Army divisions. The military would not give specific troops numbers.

"This operation is a relentless pursuit of al Qaeda, who we have seen attempting to move into new areas and disrupt the security of the local populace," said Brig. Gen. Jim Boozer, one of the deputy commanders of Task Force Iron. (Posted 8:16 a.m.)

Rice believes time is now for serious Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations

RAMALLAH, West Bank (CNN) -- U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, in the Middle East again to help restart peace negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians, said Monday she is "tremendously impressed" by the resolve of both sides and believes a proposed summit in Annapolis later this year can be a "launching pad" toward productive bargaining toward a two-state solution.

"We appear to be on course to prepare seriously for continuous ongoing negotiations," said Rice, who appeared at a press briefing on Monday in the Palestinian territory of the West Bank with Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. She met on Sunday with Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, who underscored the importance of the Annapolis summit in a speech. (Posted 7:43 a.m.)

Pakistani forces place leader of country's largest Islamic party under house arrest

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (CNN) -- Enforcing a state of emergency, Pakistani forces Monday placed Qazi Hussain Ahmad, the president of the country's largest Islamic party, under house arrest, Ahmad told CNN.

Ahmad is a prominent opposition leader and heads the Religious Party Alliance. He is confined to his home in Lahore. (Posted 7:36 a.m.)

Police arrest more lawyers, block roads to courts; U.S. postpones defense visit to Pakistan

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (CNN) -- Pakistan police, using tear gas and batons, clashed with lawyers and journalists outside the Lahore courthouse Monday, as they continued to enforce President Pervez Musharraf's emergency declaration.

More than 1,500 lawyers were arrested across Pakistan, including 1,200 in Lahore, on Monday and police blocked roads leading to courthouses in major cities.

The government denied Monday that Musharraf had himself been placed under house arrest, a rumor that was circulating widely through the country.

Political opposition figures have also been rounded up across Pakistan since Saturday's declaration, including more than 60 members of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto's Pakistan People's Party, a senior police official said.

Bhutto's spokesman called Musharraf's declaration an "act of terror" against civil society and predicted it marked "the beginning of the end of Musharraf." (Posted 7:10a.m.)

Matron at Oprah's school charged with abuse and assault

JOHANNESBURG, S. Africa (CNN) -- A matron at Oprah Winfrey's school for girls in South Africa was formally charged Monday with 13 counts of abusing and assaulting students at the school.

Dressed in a black and white football shirt, the woman, Tiny Virginia Mokobo, 27, pleaded not guilty to the charges, which include assault, indecent assault, and crimen injuria, which involves verbal abuse which violates the victim's dignity.

The state alleges there were seven victims. Six are between the ages of 13 and 14 and one was 23. (Posted 6:47 a.m.)

U.S., China defense officials praise deepening dialogue, cooperation; pledge pressure on Iran

BEIJING (CNN) -- U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates on Monday hailed deepening dialogue between the United States and China and said Beijing is helping to put pressure on Iran to halt its nuclear program.

At a news conference with Chinese Defense Minister Cao Gangchuan following their meeting, Gates said they "discussed ways to build on positive momentum in our defense relations and how to use these interactions to improve communications and reduce the risk of misunderstanding."

Cao described his meeting with Gates as "pragmatic, candid, and productive" and said future military exchanges will "deepen our friendship and cooperation."

The two men emphasized bilateral cooperation and communication, but they also discussed the issue of Iran's nuclear ambitions. (Posted 6 a.m.)

Pens down: Film, TV writers go on strike

LOS ANGELES (CNN) -- The writers who make up the words for most of the movies and television shows produced in the United States will be walking picket lines outside of major studios in New York and Los Angeles Monday morning as the Writers Guild of America has launched a strike against producers.

The writers union said a strike, which began at 12:01 a.m. Monday, is necessary to protect their future incomes as the shows they write are increasingly distributed over new media, primarily Internet downloading.

While studios have been hoarding scripts for months in anticipation of a strike, most television shows that are more topical -- especially late night TV -- are expected to immediately go to re-runs.

A last-day effort to reach a new work agreement collapsed Sunday night despite a major concession by the writers as they dropped their demand for a doubling of how much they are paid for DVD sales. This had been considered the major stumbling block to a deal. (Posted 5:36 a.m.)

Baghdad reporter missing for two weeks freed by captors

(CNN) -- A Baghdad correspondent for Radio Free Iraq who had been missing for two weeks has been freed by her captors, according to her employer, Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

She is Jumana al-Obaidi, 29, works for Radio Free Iraq. RFE/RL's Arabic-language service,

"All of us at RFE/RL are very relieved Jumana's ordeal is over," said RFE/RL President Jeff Gedmin, who added that "journalists like Jumana put their lives on the line every day. They are dedicated journalists, brave people, and Iraqi patriots. We are proud to know them."

Al-Obaidi had been taken from her car on October 22 when she was headed for an interview at the Iraqi Environment Ministry. Her driver, a man in his late 20s named Abdullah, was shot and killed and his body was found dumped. (Posted 5:25 a.m.)

Bush, Turkish PM set to meet on Iraqi-Turkish border crisis

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The Turkish prime minister is scheduled to meet with President Bush on Monday, with the tensions along the Iraqi-Turkish border topping the agenda.

The visit of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan comes as the United States and Iraq attempt to persuade Turkey to shun launching a major cross-border offensive into Iraq to fight Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK, guerrillas who have conducted attacks against Turkish targets.

"The president looks forward to continuing discussions with the prime minister on a range of issues on our common agenda, including the fight against terrorism, in particular our joint efforts to counter the PKK, and the promotion of peace and stability in Afghanistan, Iraq, Lebanon, and the broader Middle East," the White House said in a recent statement about the meeting.

Another topic on the agenda will be "U.S. support for Turkey's accession to the European Union and Turkey's efforts toward that goal." (Posted 4:45 a.m.)

Police arrest more lawyers, block roads to courts; U.S. postpones defense visit to Pakistan

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (CNN) -- Pakistan police, using tear gas and batons, clashed with lawyers and journalists outside the Lahore courthouse Monday, as they continued to enforce President Pervez Musharraf's emergency declaration.

More than 1,500 lawyers were arrested across Pakistan, including 1,200 in Lahore, on Monday and police blocked roads leading to courthouses in major cities.

The government denied Monday that Musharraf had himself been placed under house arrest, a rumor that was circulating widely through the country.

A spokesman for the People's Party of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto called Musharraf's declaration an "act of terror" against civil society and predicted it marked "the beginning of the end of Musharraf."

Pakistani Interior Minister Aftab Ahmed Khan Sherpao told CNN that parliamentary elections -- which had been set for January -- would not be held until "things become normal." (Posted 4:45 a.m.)

Police arrest more lawyers, block roads to courts

LAHORE, Pakistan (CNN) -- Pakistan police, using tear gas and batons, clashed with lawyers and journalists outside the Lahore courthouse Monday, as they continued to enforce President Pervez Musharraf's emergency declaration.

CNN's Mohsin Naqvi, who was in the crowd, said police were brutally beating the lawyers and the journalists who were covering the story. While Naqvi said he was not hit, he was coughing from the tear gas.

More than a thousand lawyers were arrested across Pakistan Monday and police blocked roads leading to courthouses in major cities.

The United States, in reaction, postponed a Pentagon official's visit to Pakistan this week for a yearly meeting with his Pakistani defense counterpart. (Posted 2:53 a.m.)

Pens down: TV, film writers go on strike

LOS ANGELES (CNN) -- The final effort to avoid a writers strike, which could cripple Hollywood's movie and television production, ended in failure Sunday evening, according to a spokesman for the Writers Guild of America.

Producers and the writers union are divided on how much residual compensation writers should be paid when their work is distributed through new media, including DVD and the Internet.

A federal mediator conducted a day-long negotiating session with both sides in Los Angeles Sunday.

While the strike officially begins at midnight in each time zone, the pickets are scheduled to begin outside major studios in Los Angeles and New York at 9 a.m. (Posted 2:12 a.m.)

U.S. postpones high-level defense talks with Pakistan

BEIJING (CNN) -- A Pentagon delegation will not travel to Pakistan this week as had been planned for a yearly meeting with their Pakistani defense counterparts because of President Pervez Musharraf's emergency declaration and suspension of Pakistan's constitution, a U.S. Defense Department spokesman said.

Undersecretary of Defense Eric Edelman had been set to visit Pakistan on Tuesday and Wednesday, but the decision was made Sunday to postpone his trip, according to Pentagon spokesman Geoff Morrell. The announcement was made in Beijing, where Defense Sec. Robert Gates is meeting with his Chinese counterpart.

"The message is consistent throughout the U.S. government expressing dissapointment at the declaration," Morrell said. "The United States wants a return to law-based democratic government."

Earlier in Beijing, Gates called Pakistan an important ally in the war on terror "We are considering all our options," Gates said. "We are not willing to risk ongong operations in the war on terror." (Posted 1:10 a.m.)

Center-left Colom wins Guatemala's presidential race

GUATEMALA CITY (CNN) -- Alvaro Colom of the center-left National Union of Hope party defeated retired Gen. Otto Perez Molina of the conservative Patriot Party in Guatemala's presidential race Sunday, according to results posted on the official election Web site.

Colom gathered nearly 53 percent of the vote to Molina's 47 percent, with 97 percent of the ballots counted, the election tribunal said. (Posted 11:46 a.m.) E-mail to a friend E-mail to a friend

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