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Schedule: World's Untold Stories

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This week on World's Untold Stories:

A Forgotten People

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video | Part 3 Video

They are one of the world's most persecuted people. According to the United Nations, the Rohingya have been oppressed for centuries, living in one of the poorest and most remote regions of Myanmar or Burma. They have been fighting an endless battle to be recognized as a distinct ethnic group and even struggling to gain basic citizenship for decades, despite living there for centuries. Facing everything from land confiscation, to rape, forced labor and murder, the Rohingya have sought safe havens abroad. Now, CNN's Dan Rivers tracks their story from the islands of Southern Thailand, where new harsh allegations of abuse have surfaced, to parts of Indonesia. Rivers uncovers exclusive photos showing these boat refugees being cut adrift, far out at sea. He speaks to the refugees themselves, hearing their stories of abuse and neglect. And he talks to shocked tourists who witnessed and photographed hundreds of Rohingya being detained and abused on a popular beach in the Similan Islands. He hears the concerns of the UNHCR and the response from the Thai authorities, as this scandal continues to dominate the government of Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva.

Previously on World's Untold Stories:

One Woman's War

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video | Part 3 Video

When Malika El Aroud was arrested for suspected terrorist offenses before Christmas last year Belgian police claimed they had detained no less than an "al Qaeda living legend." As the wife of the al Qaeda operative who assassinated Northern Alliance leader Ahmed Shah Massoud in a suicide bombing just before 9/11, her words are said to carry substantial weight in terror circles.

In this edition of the World's Untold Stories, CNN, which obtained an exclusive interview with the woman counterterror forces simply call "Malika," tells the extraordinary story of how she once used to party in Brussels nightclubs, fell in love with a militant extremist, then found herself living with Osama bin Laden's inner circle in Afghanistan. Eloquent, passionate, and persuasive she is now accused of being one of al Qaeda's most prominent online propogandists. Authorities say she may have inspired an entire cadre of radicalized Muslim men across Europe to take up arms. Their number may include her new husband, who is believed to have joined forces with al Qaeda in the tribal areas of Pakistan. CNN's documentary will shed extraordinary new insight on the continuing global security threat posed by Bin Laden's global Jihad.

Wedlocked: Speaking Up for the World's Child Brides

Nujood Ali was just 10 years old when her father married her off to a man three times her age. But rather than just sit back and accept her fate, Nujood stood up. Helped by a human rights lawyer, she convinced a judge to annul her marriage. "She's very strong," lawyer Shada Nasser tells CNN, "she's opened a big window for other girls in Yemen." In truth, Nujood was speaking up for child brides the world over. As CNN discovers, forced marriages involving underage girls can happen anywhere. "What we have to remember," says Jasvinder Sanghera, a British campaigner against forced marriage, who was herself facing marriage at the age of fifteen, "is that from a very young age we are socialised in a system of honour. Our loyalty, first and foremost, is to our family. And we're taught to be silent. We're taught that if we go against the family there will be punishment." Hearing stories from different cultures in different parts of the world, CNN's Paula Newton gives a voice to the women standing up against the forced marriage of children.

Mexico Narco Wars

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video

Remember Pablo Escobar and the Medellin drug cartel he headed back in the 1990s? If you do, then you'll also recall the battle the Colombian government had to wage -- with the help of the U.S. -- to wrest back control of their country from massively powerful drug barons. Less well known than the deadly antics of Escobar and co is that today, Mexico to the north is locked in a similar war -- this one also propped up by the Americans -- aimed at busting their own Colombian-style cartels. When he went there recently to investigate, Dateline's David O'Shea found bodies literally piling up on all sides, with your average Mexican asking where it's all going to end. A warning, David's report contains images that some of you could find disturbing. Read the producer's blog

Galileo

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video

Galileo is Europe's ambitious satellite navigation project, designed to rival the American GPS and invigorate the European transport and communications infrastructure. It started as an exciting forward-looking scheme but before long descended into diplomatic maneuvering and destructive inter-European wrangling. Galileo is a yarn worthy of it's controversial namesake.

Colombia Frontline

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World's Untold Stories takes you behind enemy lines in Colombia's war on cocaine. Anti-drug commandos fly deep into rebel-held territory. In this jungle region they hunt for traffickers, set fire to crops of coca leaves and the illegal labs that process them into cocaine. In the seedy world of drug smuggling, traffickers recruit western tourists to illegally transport drugs out of the country as "mules." These mules take great risks and face great dangers for the lure of quick money. See a smuggler prepare for his trip in a traffickers' workshop and meet a young Frenchman who was busted for smuggling and is now serving time in a Colombian prison. It's all part of the frontline in Colombia's war on drugs.

Tipping Point:

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World's Untold Stories travels to the Arctic Circle where the retreat of sea ice is alarming scientists. Aboard a Canadian Coast Guard ice breaker, we investigate whether the sea ice melt will prove to be a "tipping point" for rapid climate change. See how the polar bear adapts to his shrinking world and how the rate of climate change could intensify extreme weather worldwide. Our arctic journey takes us to the fabled Northwest Passage and explores shipping routes that could become a new reality, linking the markets of China and Europe. For some nations, the ice melt is an opportunity, potentially exposing oil and natural gas reserves which have been locked beneath the ice.

Tomb 33

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video | Part 3 Video | Part 4 Video

The area around the site of ancient Thebes is a paradise for Egyptologists. Despite being the target of tomb raiders for the past millennia, the underground near the Valley of Kings hasn't revealed all its secrets. It abounds with countless tombs, hidden corridors, and funeral chambers that have never seen the light. The greatest mystery of all is what lies in so-called Tomb 33. T his film features rare and valuable footage of the tomb as it follows the first archaeologists to have accessed the site in over a century.

Dangerous Ground

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Relations between Australia's Muslim community and the rest of the population are near to exploding. As they face increasing suspicion and hostility from the rest of the nation, young Australian Muslims are being made to feel like foreigners in their own countries. Is Australia's response to terrorism to blame?

Bangladesh: The Drowning Country

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Bangladesh is a drowning land. The last major cyclone killed 3,000 and left millions living in tents, with barely any food or drinking water. With the land literally disappearing beneath the feet of the ever increasing population, it's a problem that shows no sign of easing. Discover an extraordinary and devastated landscape that's on the front line of climate change, with water levels rising inexorably and floods that once occurred every 20 years now happening every five.

Ice Storm

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The impact of crystal methamphetamine on America's rural communities has been devastating. Nearly half the prisoners in Montana are incarcerated for meth-related crimes. The drug plays havoc with the minds and bodies of users, leaving addicts paranoid and violent. See how one town struggled to make a dent in their growing meth situation.

For a Better Life?

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Troubles in Zimbabwe have caused large numbers to seek a better life in South Africa. However, the journey is perilous and the reality migrants face when they arrive often comes with bitter disillusions. Most see this as their only chance to make a living, but endless bureaucratic hurdles keep them in precarious circumstances.

Bangladesh: The Drowning Country

Bangladesh is a drowning land. The last major cyclone killed 3,000 and left millions living in tents, with barely any food or drinking water. With the land literally disappearing beneath the feet of the ever increasing population, it's a problem that shows no sign of easing. Discover an extraordinary and devastated landscape that's on the front line of climate change, with water levels rising inexorably and floods that once occurred every 20 years now happening every five.

Brazil: Amazon's Golden Curse

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video

Travel to the heart of the Brazilian Amazon rainforest to reveal just how some of the earth's most isolated people are being affected by the economic problems and the rise of the price of gold to record levels.

Child Denied

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When Helena Ferenciková was 19 years old and in the throes of labor with her first child, she was told to sign a document. Only afterwards did she realize she had authorized her own sterilization. Eleven years previously, the same happened to Elena Gorolová. Both women are fighting for justice. Helena has chosen legal action, and became the first Roma woman to win a case in Central Europe against the hospital that sterilized her in 2001. Elena addresses international audiences to ensure this never happens again.

Greenland Goes Green

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Greenland's ice caps are melting faster than predicted -- and local farmers couldn't be happier. Thanks to rising temperatures, they can now grow new crops and raise cattle for the first time since the Vikings. Warmer seas are bringing huge catches of cod and growing seasons are up to a month longer. "A little bit of extra warmth is good for us", says agricultural consultant Kenneth Hoegh. "We're growing things we would have hesitated to grow in the past". But not all farmers are happy as the environmental balance becomes increasingly precarious.


PNG Babies

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Papua New Guinea is facing a crisis of the young and innocent. The country's morgues are filling up with tiny abandoned corpses. For every one thousand babies born in PNG, more than seventy will die before their fifth birthday. "We're hitting our head against a brick wall" says one distraught community worker. But some unsung heroes are giving the babies dignity in death and teaching young women about the threat of disease and malnutrition.

The Coldest Winter

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The situation in Afghanistan steadily deteriorates. In the past 12 months, thousands of Afghans have been killed and clashes between NATO troops and insurgents are commonplace. Six years after the US-led invasion, the rhetoric has changed. Soldiers no longer talk about wiping out the Taliban or hunting down terrorists. Now, the buzz words are tactics of counter insurgency. "We have to look constantly at ways to do it better and do it differently", states Lt Col. Woods. His men appear exhausted and demoralized. At night, the temperature drops to -30C. Blizzards have grounded their helicopters but despite the extreme weather, troops from the US 82nd Airborne are heading out for a 10-day patrol. "The Coldest Winter" follows them as they battle the elements and the tense environment.

Malawi: Africa's Deadly Brain Drain

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Africa is in the grip of a medical crisis as its doctors are lured away by lucrative jobs in Europe. Malawi now only has one doctor for every 50,000 people. "We are working under very difficult conditions. It's like we are in a war", laments Robert Lapyam Ayella, the only doctor at Mulanje District Hospital. He's one of the few African doctors who hasn't moved to the West, where they can earn 200 to 300 times more. Making matters worse, approximately 25 percent of Malawi's health staff are expected to die of HIV/AIDS in the next decade. Facing these problems, it's not surprising entire medical classes decide to emigrate to the West. As one expat Malawian doctor states: "I earn a good wage in England. Why should I go back to Malawi to suffer?"

Trapped: Part One

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video

"You can run, but you can't hide" say the girls, who night after night sell themselves to an endless stream of men. They ply their soulless trade in filthy brothels or parked cars. This film captures first hand the violence and eeriness of life working on European streets for young African women and girls who were tricked into leaving their villages with promises of a better life. Michelle Mildwater specializes in trauma. Her exceptional sensitivity allows two women -- Anna and Joy -- to tell their horrific stories. In "Trapped: Part One" we hear their tales of life on the streets of Europe. "Trapped: Part Two" will be seen on TV at the same times next week, follows their shameful deportation home.

Trapped: Part Two

Watch the program: Part 3 Video | Part 4 Video

Each year an estimated 2 million women and children are tricked, beaten, raped and forced by threat of death into the world's growing sex industry. "Trapped: Part One" followed Anna and Joy as they helplessly resisted being forced into prostitution on the streets of Europe. In this, "Trapped: Part Two," we follow them home to Nigeria, ruined and ashamed. We also get a rare glimpse of how desperate families are tricked into giving up their children to strangers from Europe who promise them riches, then sell them as sex slaves.

The Carteret Islands: That sinking feeling

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We've heard a great deal about the effects of climate change. The Carterets in the Pacific could be the first islands in the world to disappear due to rising sea levels blamed on global warming. "Our houses are getting closer and closer to the sea", complains one woman. "Maybe one day, a tidal wave will sweep everyone away". It's estimated that the Carteret Islands will be completely submerged by 2015. Already, the beaches are littered with fallen trees, their roots eroded by the tide. Rising sea levels have made it impossible for the islanders to grow anything apart from coconuts. They are now dependent on aid from Papua New Guinea, which plans to relocate residents from the island. Some though, refuse to move. As one states; "If the island is lost, I'm lost too."

Darfur Crisis

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"I'm sick, cold, hungry," laments one refugee. "How long will this go on?" Five years into the humanitarian crisis, the situation in Darfur shows no signs of improving. The Sudanese government and Janjaweed militias have been trying to dislodge a rebel movement, with civilians caught in the middle. At least 200,000 people are thought to have died. Government official, Al-Hadi Ahem Ali, is responsible for keeping the displaced alive. But NGOs feel hampered by government bureaucracy and the worsening security situation. "A colleague was killed the day before yesterday, something like 18 drivers are missing" complains one aid worker. Al Hadi assures them: "Security is OK. There is no real problem". This exclusive report - filmed inside Darfur - reveals the refugees' plight. Bangladesh: The forgotten people

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video

Decades after Myanmar's (formerly Burma) military junta forced the Rohingyas into exile, their suffering still continues. Trapped in displacement camps, they survive on starvation rations in constant fear of abuse. "My people are rotting," despairs one refugee. The Bangladesh government classes the Rohingyas as illegal immigrants. According to the UNHCR, guards at the displacement camp are accused of forcing refugees into prostitution, extortion and stealing food. Thousands more live in slums along the Naj river without the basic protection of the U.N. "We survive by collecting leaves and boiling them," says one woman. "No-one cares about us."Gaza Tunnels

Every night, 14-year-old Said scrambles down a narrow shaft leading to a tunnel. He'll spend the next eight hours digging without a break. It's claustrophobic, difficult and dangerous work. He, like others in Gaza, is digging a tunnel to Egypt. The tunnels are used to smuggle everything from weapons for Hamas to basic household goods that are not available in Gaza's isolation. The tunnels are the only way to import goods into the territory. "They're a gold mine!" states Said. But to his disgust, most of the profits go to other people. "We do all the work, then they swindle us," he complains. Once the tunnel is nearly ready, "other people will open it, do the trafficking and make more money than us." The money that Said makes will support his entire family. But every time he goes into the tunnel, he knows: "You are digging your own grave."

Romania -- The Lost Children

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Decades after the world was shocked by pictures of Romanian orphans tied to their cots in squalid conditions, many children are still being held in old-style institutions. Babies at the pediatric unit are unnaturally quiet. They've learnt there's no point in crying. "They have no affiliation, no stability," laments supervisor Dr Monica Nicoara. Previously, many of these babies would have been adopted by Western families. But foreign adoptions are now banned and authorities want to find Romanian families for abandoned children. However this new system has failed many of the country's most vulnerable. Ricardo and George ended up on the streets after their parents abandoned them. They've given up on the state and now take care of each other.

Harsh Beauty

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video | Part 3 Video

For centuries, Eunuchs have been an important part of Indian society. But the elevated role they once held has now faded. Today they live in isolated communities, working as prostitutes and beggars. Life may be hard but inside the community of hermaphrodites and castrated males, there's a real sense of warmth and camaraderie. 'Harsh Beauty' follows the lives of Jyothi, Usha and Hira Bai, three Eunuchs who struggle for acceptance in a culture splintered by religion, caste and politics. Filmed over four years, this is a warm and poignant look inside this usually hidden group.

Costa Del Con

Watch: Part 1 | Part 2

By some estimates, 40 percent of all construction in Europe is taking place in Spain. Marbella is at the centre of the building boom, but that boom could turn to bust. Marbella's local council stands accused of sanctioning illegal construction projects in exchange for bribes. More than 30,000 apartments originally approved by the council violate planning laws.

Since Marbella's case broke, dozens of similar cases have been discovered across Spain in what has become one of the country's biggest scandals in years. (Read the blog and join the discussion)

Female Peacekeepers

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video

The civil war ended three years ago. But life in Liberia is still far from stable. That's where the peacekeepers come in. Some 15,000 U.N. soldiers and police officers are helping to ensure a brighter future for Liberia's 3.2 million citizens. As "World's Untold Stories: Liberia -- Female Peacekeepers" reveals, one battalion in the capital Monrovia is actually all female -- a big first for the United Nations. The unit of Indian women is making a real difference in a country where rape was a common weapon of war. As one peacekeeper remarks|: "Men lose their temper, but women rarely do." The unit is also helping to repair the U.N.'s tarnished image in Liberia, where male personnel were once notorious for abusing women.

Escape from North Korea

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Capture means certain death. So why do some defectors risk it all to escape from North Korea? World's Untold Stories brings viewers the extraordinary story of the Park family, who cross borders and dodge checkpoints to make it to freedom. "Escape from North Korea" follows the Parks as they make their dangerous exodus into an uncertain future. The documentary also explores the hidden network of people who help North Koreans escape from Kim Jong Il's brutal and repressive regime-a regime that's now building a wall along the Chinese border to deter defectors.

Vesuvius

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Have the planners responsible for safety around Mount Vesuvius got it wrong? Three million people live near the volcano. If it erupts with little warning, it will be impossible for them to escape. Vesuvius may be the world's most monitored volcano but, for those watching, it's still a guessing game. Italian authorities insist they'll have several weeks notice before an eruption. But at least one scientist believes authorities will only have a day, and says "not taking into account the worst case scenario is criminal." He is particularly concerned that the biggest hospital in Southern Italy is being built in the path of the last lava flow. "It's a totally crazy decision, probably dictated by political opportunity." Now, even the government's advisor is recommending the evacuation period around Vesuvius be cut to three days.

Bolivia Meltdown

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Bolivians once boasted that the Chacaltaya glacier was the world's highest ski run. But the skiers stopped coming in the late 1990s. That's because the place known by the Aymara Indians as "cold road" is melting - and fast. The glacier serves as the main source of drinking water for millions of people who live in the region. As "World's Untold Stories: Bolivia Meltdown" reveals, that tap could begin to run dry within just a few years. Glaciologist Edson Ramirez says: "It's a critical problem - it's the same problem for Peru, Ecuador and Colombia - all the Andes." Global warming is at least partly to blame says Edson: "We do know that the effects of human activities accelerate it and play the role of the catalyst in this cycle."

Female Peacekeepers

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video

The civil war ended three years ago. But life in Liberia is still far from stable. That's where the peacekeepers come in. Some 15,000 U.N. soldiers and police officers are helping to ensure a brighter future for Liberia's 3.2 million citizens. As "World's Untold Stories: Liberia -- Female Peacekeepers" reveals, one battalion in the capital Monrovia is actually all female -- a big first for the United Nations. The unit of Indian women is making a real difference in a country where rape was a common weapon of war. As one peacekeeper remarks|: "Men lose their temper, but women rarely do." The unit is also helping to repair the U.N.'s tarnished image in Liberia, where male personnel were once notorious for abusing women.

Gay Conversion

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video

To some Christian groups in the United States homosexuality is not only a sin, it's a mental disorder. As such, they feel it can be cured. More than 100 camps have been set up to administer "re-orientation therapy" with the intention of turning gay people straight. The programs are big business and highly controversial. Those running the camps say they have a 30 percent success rate. Opponents believe re-orientation therapy is dangerous, sometimes leading to attempted suicide by those who feel that they have failed God.

Congo's tin soldiers

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It doesn't glitter like a diamond or burn like oil but cassiterite is another natural resource that is causing more pain than profit for the majority of Africans that try to extract it from their soil. Demand for cassiterite - a tin ore used in computer circuitry -- is on the rise. So too is illegal mining of the ore in the Democratic Republic of Congo where militias are forcing laborers to work in atrocious conditions with little or no pay. Reporter Jonathan Miller treks deep into the jungle to see how it works.

Children of war

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In the 1990s, Yugoslavia dissolved into a series of bitter conflicts that claimed 200,000 lives. War crimes were committed on all sides resulting in terrible atrocities -- but one crime stands out as being particularly shocking -- the systematic rape of thousands of Bosnian Muslim women by Serbs. Tens of thousands of women were raped during the war; estimates of the number of babies born as a result of rape are hard to come by, but range from a few hundred to more than five thousand. No one really knows. The Serbian rape policy has left a confronting legacy in socially conservative Bosnia; it is little talked about in this predominantly Muslim society. In the country today, the children born of rape are growing into teenagers and some are beginning to ask difficult questions about their origins. In many cases the women tell their children that their fathers were killed in the war rather than expose them to the truth. Now it's feared that the children born to those women will be ostracized from society, rekindling ethnic tension that fueled the war to begin with.

Brothers of Kabul

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This documentary paints a disturbing picture of drug abuse and treatment in this war torn country. Afghanistan has not only been torn apart by conflict, but is increasingly being blighted by drugs and the drug industry. The country is the world's largest opium producer, feeding the insatiable appetite of heroin addicts far from its borders. But there are addicts at home as well. Reza and Hussein are brothers that live in squalor in Kabul's Old City. Heroin has drained them in every sense, making them outcasts in a society that cannot afford rehabilitation programs. Their only hope to kick the habit lies in Kabul's Mental Health hospital where screams from electro-shock therapy can be heard in the corridors. Yet the brothers are determined: "If you ever see me in any of the drugs dens again, shoot me," says Hussein.

State of Despair

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The flood of Iraqis to neighboring countries has provoked the greatest Middle Eastern refugee crisis in 60 years. They live in cramped squalid conditions, in constant fear of being deported. In Jordan, hundreds of thousands of Iraqis are struggling to survive in the capital, Amman. No country will offer asylum to Palestinian refugees, also fleeing Iraq. These refugees are now stranded and stateless in border camps like Rweished. "Our only fault is that we're Palestinian", despairs Khaled. During summer, temperatures here reach 50C. In winter, they fall below freezing. Their tents are regularly ripped to shreds by sandstorms and people have reached breaking point. "Most of us here are sick. Everyone is suffering."

Harsh Beauty

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video | Part 3 Video

For centuries, Eunuchs have been an important part of Indian society. But the elevated role they once held has now faded. Today they live in isolated communities, working as prostitutes and beggars. Life may be hard but inside the community of hermaphrodites and castrated males, there's a real sense of warmth and camaraderie. 'Harsh Beauty' follows the lives of Jyothi, Usha and Hira Bai, three Eunuchs who struggle for acceptance in a culture splintered by religion, caste and politics. Filmed over four years, this is a warm and poignant look inside this usually hidden group.

Surfing Soweto

Watch the program: Part 1 Video | Part 2 Video

"I always wanted to be a stuntman", says one of a growing number of disaffected youths that ride on top of speeding trains for a quick thrill. Hundreds of people have been killed "surfing" the trains -- dancing, ducking bridges and hanging from the sides. Most of the Soweto surfers come from broken homes in the impoverished South African township, spending their days drinking, smoking and performing their acrobatics.

Read the producers' blog and join the discussion

Costa Del Con

Watch: Part 1 | Part 2

By some estimates, 40 percent of all construction in Europe is taking place in Spain. Marbella is at the centre of the building boom, but that boom could turn to bust. Marbella's local council stands accused of sanctioning illegal construction projects in exchange for bribes. More than 30,000 apartments originally approved by the council violate planning laws.

Since Marbella's case broke, dozens of similar cases have been discovered across Spain in what has become one of the country's biggest scandals in years. (Read the blog and join the discussion)

Ahmadinejad's Iran

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When Mahmoud Ahmadinejad took office as the president of Iran nearly two years ago he promised an economic overhaul. He spent billions on infrastructure projects and salary increases, but this led to a surge in inflation. In local elections last year the president's supporters suffered heavy defeats. Despite the domestic challenges, the ongoing tension with the international community over Iran's nuclear policies could define Ahmadinejad's presidency. Many Iranians are outraged at the West's criticism of the country's nuclear programme. So what do Iranians think about Ahmadinejad's leadership overall? Read the blog and join the discussion.

Land of Missing Children

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One hub of the international sex trade is northeastern India. Many young girls end up in Kolkata (Calcutta) and nearby towns. Reporter Sam Kiley accompanies reluctant police on a raid where girls are rescued from a dank attic only to disappear again into the night. "They were sent to sell milk in the market place and vanished." Hear one mother's anguish, fearing that her daughters have been abducted and sold into prostitution. Read the blog and join the discussion.

Love and betrayal in the West Bank

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This stark documentary tells the story of a member of Islamic Jihad who became an informant for Israel. He operated inside one of the group's suicide bomber cells, reportedly providing intelligence that led to an Israeli strike against Islamic Jihad leaders. Later, his identity is discovered. The producers of "Love and Betrayal in the West Bank" gained remarkable access to film inside the Islamic Jihad movement, providing rare insights into its operations in the territory.

Baghdad Blogger (Part One)

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We see disturbing pictures from Iraq on a daily basis. Reporters reporting. Politicians talking. But what about the ordinary Iraqis who struggle to earn a living, keep the family unit intact and simply survive from one day to the next? "Baghdad Blogger" Salam Pax takes an insightful and sometimes irreverent look at the daily travails in two reports: "How to Stay Alive in Iraq" and "How to Have Fun in Baghdad."

Baghdad Blogger (Part Two)

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Although women make up 60 percent of the population in Iraq, they remain marginalized. Since the war, many feel their position has deteriorated. "Millions are being pushed back into their houses. We are seeing measures that were not there before," states one resident. In "The Battle for Women's Rights," Baghdad Blogger Salam Pax looks at the extraordinary challenges -- and risks -- that many women in Iraq face. Also in this edition of "World's Untold Stories," Pax shows us how to "Make it Rich" in a country with an economy in tatters.

Road to Terrorism

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The southern Philippines is a hotbed of terrorist activity. Jemaah Islamiyah, Abu Sayyaf and Al Qaeda all operate in this troubled territory. To combat the growing threat, a heavily armed anti-terrorist unit operates in the shadows, weeding out Jihadist networks and launching daring raids to arrest or kill the operatives. Police Chief Lito has led the unit for 18 years. He's received a tip-off. As the unit moves in, a shot rings out. Lito's informant has been hit. The next day, another raid. Another colleague is gunned down. "I am fighting the grasp of terrorism here", he says. This documentary provides extraordinary access to the fight against terrorism at the ground level.

A Tale of Two Women

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The monumental statues known as the Buddhas of Bamyan became a symbol of Taliban tyranny when they were destroyed in 2001. Now there's a symbol of how drastically things have changed in Afghanistan. The province of Bamyan is home to the country's first and only female Governor. Habiba Sarabi is trying to carve out a new Afghanistan by sending girls to school and persuading farmers to give up their opium crops. Her success however is offset by the daily struggles of the country's other prominent female politician. Outspoken Member of Parliament Malalai Joya lives under constant threat of assassination. Her speeches are frequently interrupted and other politicians have called for her to be raped. But she remains defiant. "I accept these risks because of my people."

The Very Thin Blue Line

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When will Iraqis police themselves? This is a question that has become hotly debated in the corridors of power, but what of the police recruits themselves? Every six months the equivalent of an entire training class of 1,500 Iraqis is wiped out. Yet recruits continue to sign up, many of them desperate for the money.

The Very Thin Blue Line takes us inside a police training camp in Jordan where the instructors focus on one skill in particular -- survival.

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