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More money means longer hours

  • Story Highlights
  • Poll: 37 percent of $100,000-earners work between up to 50 hours a week
  • Sixteen percent of men claim to work more than 50 hours per week
  • The majority of Americans have only one job

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By Mary Lorenz
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CareerBuilder

Editor's note: CNN.com has a business partnership with CareerBuilder.com, which serves as the exclusive provider of job listings and services to CNN.com.

Editor's Note: CNN.com has a business partnership with CareerBuilder.com, which serves as the exclusive provider of job listings and services to CNN.com.

(CareerBuilder.com) -- While the majority of Americans are working for the weekend, there's a good chance that some of your co-workers are also working on the weekends. As indicated by two recent MSN-Zogby surveys, many Americans are putting in longer work weeks than the average 40-hour gig, and several are even holding more than one job.

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They work hard for the money

Don't think that Americans aren't earning those paychecks. The MSN-Zogby poll shows a direct correlation between higher household incomes and the tendency to put in longer work weeks.

More than one in three (37 percent) workers with $100,000 or more in household income say they typically work between 41 and 50 hours per week, and an additional 17 percent say they usually work more than 50 hours per week. Once household incomes reach less than $25,000, the tendency to work longer weeks decreases significantly: Only 8 percent of workers in this group work between 41 and 50 hours per week and just 2 percent work over 50 hours.

Among those clocking more office hours, the majority are men and workers with children living at home. Sixteen percent of men claim to work more than 50 hours per week, but only half of that amount of women is likely to do the same. Finally, 17 percent of workers with children aged 17 and younger living at home are likely to put in a longer work week, but only 11 percent of those without kids have the same tendency.

If Americans are logging more working hours, the reason isn't likely to be because they're holding more than one job. The majority of Americans have only one job, another MSN-Zogby poll shows. Those who work two or more jobs, however, are slightly more likely to be single, have children living at home, and have an annual household income of $25,000 to $35,000.

According to the poll, more than half of Americans (58 percent) say they work only one job, but 9 percent work two or more jobs. The tendency to have more than one job shows little variation among different regions, but workers living in Great Lakes and Central states are slightly more likely than workers in other regions to have multiple jobs.

Eleven percent of single Americans work more than one job, only a slight increase from the 8 percent of married Americans who do the same. Of those workers with children younger than 17 living at home, 10 percent work more than one job, only slightly higher than the 8 percent of workers without children who engage in this behavior. And with 14 percent of them working more than one job, workers with $25,000 to $35,000 in household were more likely than those in other household income brackets to do so.

Overall, another 6 percent say they have one job but also own their own business. Married Americans (7 percent) are more likely than their single counterparts (2 percent) to fall into this category. E-mail to a friend E-mail to a friend

Copyright CareerBuilder.com 2009. All rights reserved. The information contained in this article may not be published, broadcast or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority

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