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Quick Guide & Transcript: Special: I-Reports

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(CNN Student News) -- June 15, 2007

Transcript

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

MONICA LLOYD, CNN STUDENT NEWS ANCHOR: Hey there. Thanks for checking out this special summer edition of CNN Student News. I'm Monica Lloyd. All summer long, we'll be bringing you new shows every other week, exclusively at CNN.com/EDUCATION. And we've got an assignment for you just a little later on, so stick around!

Today, you're going to meet a high school student who's doing his best to get a spot in front of the camera. Yeah, that guy right there, he wants my job! We're going to show you how you can be a part of creating CNN Student News, and say "I report for CNN!"

First Up: i-Reporters

LLOYD: Have you ever seen news happening right in front of you and wanted to share it with the world? Well, CNN has a way to make that happen. It's called i-Report, and just like the name says, it lets you be the reporter. So how does it all work? Simple: If you see something newsworthy, just get your camera rolling and send in the video. Jacqui Jeras checks out what some of our i-Reporters have sent in recently.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JACQUI JERAS, CNN REPORTER: An avalanche caught on tape. I-Reporter Dane Brodke captured this man-made avalanche earlier this year. It was triggered by a ski patrol while Dane toured Baldy Peak in Alta, Utah. Wild weather continues to be a driving force for our i-Reporters. Whitney Purvis got a close look at this tornado in New Mexico Saturday.

WHITNEY PURVIS, I-REPORTER: When I first saw it, it was sort of, it looked like a little bit of a dust devil, which I think it rapidly became a funnel cloud, and that's when I knew I should grab my camera. And I just luckily thought to take a video of it, because you can see it really getting stronger and stronger. I don't think I really realized that it was so close to the highway. I think I was a little bit entranced by the whole thing.

JERAS: You can check out more videos and pictures at CNN.com. Just look for the i-Report logo. And as always, remember: stay safe and out of harm's way.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

Student i-Reporter: James Brierton

LLOYD: During this school year, one particular i-Reporter jumped at the chance to show his stuff to a national audience. James Brierton, a 16-year-old student at Smithtown High School East in New York, sent us several reports. Here's a sample of some his work.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

JAMES BRIERTON, I-REPORTER: The first significant snow storm for the New York City tri-state area engulfed Long Island overnight, leaving what you see behind me: a coating of snow, sleet and ice that is now beginning to freeze on the roadways as temperatures begin to drop. It's currently 29 degrees outside right now and temperatures are expected to drop overnight. That's going to make travel conditions very difficult. The Long Island Railroad has already suspended all trains on the Roconcama branch due to a jack-knifed tractor trailer. As well, Long Island is in a high winds watch, and we're expecting gusts of up to 50 miles per hour.

BRIERTON: It has killed more than 400,000 and displaced more than 2.5 million, and many believe it is being run by the government itself. But surprisingly, it has slipped underneath the radar of the public. And that's why students from across Long Island came here to Hofstra University for the Darfur Awareness Conference.

SOUNDBITE: Every small step that we take, every small action, could actually save a life. Even if we just save one, it's one life saved. It's worth it.

BRIERTON: From Hofstra University on Long Island, I'm James Brierton, i-Report for CNN.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

i-Report: What I Did on My Summer Vacation

LLOYD: So, do you have a great story to tell? Think you've got what it takes to be the next big name at CNN? Well, now's your chance. Go to CNN.com/EDUCATION and file your i-Report! Here's your first assignment: "What I did on my Summer Vacation." Sure, you've heard it before, but why not give the old standby a 21st century makeover? Send us your pics from your vacation, shoot some video of your mission trip or fill out a blog entry about your summer job. You're going to need your parents' permission first to send it in, but go ahead and get started. And pretty soon, maybe you can say "I report for CNN Student News."

i-Report DOs and DON'Ts

LLOYD: If you want to send in an i-Report, here are some important dos and don'ts. First, be creative! Think about what you'd like to see on TV and make it happen! Make your i-Report the best possible quality: No unsteady or super fast camera work, and use a good microphone. Be sure to get release forms from people you interview and send those in with your video. We'll need them to put your story on the air. And here are some things to avoid. Don't use music. It can cause some legal issues if you do, so let's just keep things simple. And besides, if your story is good enough, you won't need any music to make it better. Don't use video that's not yours. That would be stealing, so make sure you shoot all the video yourself. Finally, most importantly, don't do anything dangerous. That electrical storm or tornado might look like a cool idea for an i-Report, but no video is worth it if you put yourself at risk. So always be smart when you're shooting.

Goodbye

LLOYD: So go on out there, shoot some stories and send us in your i-Reports. We're looking forward to seeing what you come up with. And just so you know, we're going to be changing our homepage from CNN.com/EDUCATION to cnnstudentnews.com. Don't worry, both addresses will still get you here for a while. But you'll probably want to change your bookmarks as soon as you can. That's going to wrap it up for today's show. We'll see you back here in two weeks with a whole new CNN Student News. Thanks for watching, everybody. I'm Monica Lloyd.


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