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Monday, October 2

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Editor's Note: The CNN Wire is a running log of the latest news from CNN World Headquarters, reported by CNN's correspondents and producers, and The CNN Wire editors. "Posted" times are Eastern Daylight.

Hastert ignores newspaper's call for his resignation

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- House Speaker Dennis Hastert ignored a call by a conservative Washington newspaper for him to resign in the midst of a growing scandal and possible cover-up involving former Rep. Mark Foley and sexually explicit instant messages Foley allegedly exchanged with former underage male pages.

"The Speaker has and will lead the Republican conference to another majority in the 110th Congress," Hastert spokesman Ron Bonjean said in a statement coming a little over a month ahead of mid-term elections.

The call for Hastert's resignation came in an editorial that appeared in Tuesday's edition of the Washington Times, which was available online late Monday.

"House Speaker Dennis Hastert must do the only right thing, and resign his speakership at once," the editorial says.

"Either he was grossly negligent for not taking the red flags fully into account and ordering a swift investigation, for not even remembering the order of events leading up to last week's revelations -- or he deliberately looked the other way in hopes that a brewing scandal would simply blow away."

The FBI, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the House Ethics Committee are now investigating Foley's conduct -- and whether there was any attempt to cover it up. (Posted 2:50 a.m.)

Thaksin resigns from ruling party 2 weeks after coup

BANGKOK (CNN) -- Thailand's ousted Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra announced his resignation from his ruling party Tuesday, a full two weeks after military officers seized power from him in a bloodless coup d'etat.

According to Thaksin spokesman Jakrapob Penkair, the former prime minister's resignation came in a three page hand-written letter that was faxed from his London home to Thai Rak Thai party headquarters in Bangkok.

Thaksin was forced from office on September 19 while he was in New York to speak to the U.N. General Assembly. (Posted 1:30 a.m.)

2 U.S. soldiers, 1 Afghan soldier die in Afghanistan

BAGRAM AIRFIELD, Afghanistan (CNN) -- Two U.S. soldiers and and an Afghan soldier were killed in fighting Monday evening in eastern Afghanistan, a military statement said. Three U.S. soldiers were also wounded.

According to the Coalition Press Information Center, the casualties occurred when extremists attacked a combat patrol that was operating in the Pech district of Kunar province.

Over 7,000 Afghan and U.S. troops are operating in eastern Afghanistan as part of Operation Mountain Fury, an operation against a growing Taliban insurgency.

Since the start of the war in Afghanistan, the U.S. military has suffered 179 fatalities. (Posted 1:20 a.m.)

Day fire fully contained in Ventura County

LOS ANGELES (CNN) -- The month-long Day fire in Ventura Country was declared fully contained Monday evening, a U.S. Forest Service spokesman said.

According to Curtis Vincent, the blaze near Oaji, Calif., that started Labor Day has scorched about 162,700 acres, or 254 square miles.

Vincent said it could take up to a week for firefighters to mop up all the hot spots and officially call the fire "out." (Posted 1:20 a.m.)

4th victim in Amish school shooting dies

PARADISE, Pa. (CNN) -- A fourth young girl, shot by a milk truck driver who stormed a school in Amish Pennsylvania Monday, has died, state police commissioner Jeffrey Miller said.

Three other girls -- two students and a teenage aide -- died on the scene before the gunman killed himself. (Posted 10:17 p.m.)

South Korean foreign minister moves closer to becoming new U.N. chief

UNITED NATIONS (CNN) -- In a straw poll, 14 of 15 members of the U.N. Security Council Monday selected South Korean Foreign Minister Ban Ki-Moon as their choice to succeed Kofi Annan as secretary-general of the world body, the Chinese ambassador said.

One member of the council had no opinion, said Wang Guangya.

"It is quite clear from today's straw poll that Minister Ban Ki-Moon is the candidate that the Security Council will recommend to the General Assembly," Wang said.

The U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, John Bolton -- who refused to discuss the straw poll -- said the "first and perhaps last formal vote" will be held next Monday. Official announcement of that vote will come Tuesday. (Posted 10:06 p.m.)

Hastert offers details of how information about Foley unfolded

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Trying to counter the impression that House GOP leaders might have turned a blind eye to misconduct by former Rep. Mark Foley, House Speaker Dennis Hastert Monday offered CNN a more detailed explanation of what he and his staff knew and when they knew it.

In an interview with CNN Congressional Correspondent Andrea Koppel, Hastert said that last fall, staff members in the office of Rep. Rodney Alexander, R-La., contacted his office with information about what were described as "overly friendly" e-mails Foley sent to a former teenage House page, who had been sponsored by Alexander.

In those e-mails, Foley asked the male teen to send him a picture of himself and asked what he wanted for his birthday -- requests which troubled the teen enough that he forwarded them on to a House staffer for advice on how to handle the situation. (Posted 9:45 p.m.)

Lawyer says Foley not a pedophile; GOP leaders try to control political damage

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- As House Republican leaders struggled Monday to contain the political fallout over former Rep. Mark Foley's sexually charged electronic banter with teenage pages, a "completely devastated" Foley was undergoing treatment for alcoholism and mental illness, his lawyer said.

While conceding that Foley had inappropriate communications with pages and former pages, attorney David Roth said Foley had "never, ever had an inappropriate sexual contact with a minor in his life."

"He is absolutely, positively not a pedophile," Roth said. "He is apologetic for the communications that he made while under the influence of alcohol, which he acknowledges are totally inappropriate and are not the product of the sober and healthy Mark Foley."

Roth described Foley as "extremely depressed" and said he "is contrite, remorseful and devastated by the harm that his actions have caused to others." (Posted 9:41 p.m.)

State Dept.: Rice, Tenet, Black met in July 2001

JEDDAH, Saudi Arabia (CNN) -- Then-National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice did have a July 2001 meeting with CIA Director George Tenet about the threat posed by the al Qaeda terrorist network, but the information presented to her was not new, her spokesman said Monday.

A new book by journalist Bob Woodward says Tenet and Cofer Black, then the U.S. counterterrorism chief, demanded a snap meeting with Rice to warn her of a growing al Qaeda threat to U.S. interests and possibly the U.S. homeland. The meeting took place July 10, 2001 -- two months before al Qaeda suicide hijackers attacked New York and Washington, killing nearly 3,000 people.

According Woodward's book, "State of Denial," Tenet and Black left the meeting with the sense that Rice had given them "the brush-off." And the meeting was never reported to the independent commission that investigated the attacks, Woodward writes.

Rice, now secretary of state, told reporters traveling with her Sunday that she did not remember any "so-called emergency meeting" and said any meeting records had been turned over to the 9/11 commission. (Posted 9:05 p.m.)

Justice Dept. tells Hastert it will look into Foley scandal

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Responding to a request from House Speaker Dennis Hastert, the Justice Department said Monday that the FBI and federal prosecutors are conducting a preliminary investigation into possible criminal violations stemming from former Rep. Mark Foley's sexually charged electronic communications with former House pages.

However, a letter sent to Hastert by Acting Assistant Attorney General James Clinger did not respond directly to Hastert's request that the scope of the federal probe include "any and all individuals" who may have been aware of Foley's conduct, including Hastert and other House GOP leaders.

One senior Justice official termed Hastert's request "unusual" but said if the Foley probe leads to evidence of wrongdoing by others, it would be pursued as part of the investigation. (Posted 9:01 p.m.)

Arraignment scheduled for Wednesday for 2 charged in Hamdaniya case

CAMP PENDLETON, Calif. (CNN) -- Arraignments will be held Wednesday for two of the soldiers charged with murder and other offenses relating to the death of an Iraqi civilian on April 26 near Hamdaniya.

The arraignments for Cpl. Marshall L. Magincalda and PFC John J. Jodka will be held before Col. Steve Folsom, the military judge, at Camp Pendleton. (Posted 8:50 p.m.)

Allen makes televised speech to refocus Senate campaign

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- After weeks of allegations that he used racial slurs, embattled Republican Sen. George Allen took to the Virginia airwaves Monday with a speech meant as a "turning point" in his re-election bid.

In a two-minute address that Allen's campaign paid to air, the senator said his race with former Navy Secretary Jim Webb has moved away from discussions of "real issues" that concern Virginians.

Appearing with his wife, Susan, at his side, Allen touted his record as Virginia's governor in the 1990s and in the Senate since 2001, saying he cut taxes, helped reform the state's welfare system and worked to curb illegal immigration. He also restated his support for the war in Iraq, but he said he was "concerned" by course of the conflict, which Webb opposed launching. (Posted 8:47 p.m.)

Amish school shooting leaves 3 dead, 8 wounded

PARADISE, Pa. (CNN) -- The man who shot and killed three girls and wounded eight more at an Amish school was prepared for a long standoff with authorities, carrying three guns, more than 600 rounds of ammunition and toilet paper, police said Monday.

Instead, Charles Carl Roberts IV died by his own hand about an hour after he burst into the one-room Georgetown School, about 60 miles west of Philadelphia.

His wife said the man who carried out the execution-style killings "was not the Charlie I've been married to for almost 10 years." But investigators said the rampage stemmed from a 20-year-old desire for revenge for something that remained a mystery Monday night. (Posted 7:41 p.m.)

2 more Marines reported dead in Iraq

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- The U.S. military early Tuesday announced the deaths of two Marines, both assigned to Regimental Combat Team 7, over the weekend in Anbar province.

One Marine died Saturday from injuries received in combat and the second died the following day, also from injuries received in combat.

Since the start of the war, the U.S. military has suffered 2,721 fatalities in Iraq.

The military had already announced the deaths of three other Marines on Sunday in Anbar province, and a soldier was killed on Monday in Baghdad. (Posted 7:40 p.m.)

Foley in rehab, as GOP leaders try to control political damage

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- As House Republican leaders struggled Monday to contain the political fallout over former Rep. Mark Foley's sexually charged electronic banter with teenage pages, Foley announced he had checked himself into a treatment center for alcoholism "and related behavioral problems."

"Painfully, the events that led to my resignation have crystallized recognition of my long-standing significant alcohol and emotional difficulties," Foley said in a letter faxed to WPBF-TV in West Palm Beach. "I strongly believe that I am an alcoholic and have accepted the need for immediate treatment."

Foley's attorney, David Roth, confirmed the authenticity of the letter, which did not disclose where the former congressman was being treated. Roth scheduled a news conference for Monday evening.

The FBI, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the House Ethics Committee are now investigating Foley's conduct -- and whether there was any attempt to cover it up.

House Speaker Dennis Hastert Monday flatly denied that anyone in the GOP leadership knew about sexually explicit instant messages Foley allegedly exchanged with former pages back in 2003. But that assertion didn't satisfy House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who demanded that Republican leaders be questioned under oath about what they knew about Foley's conduct. (Posted 6:57 p.m.)

Amish school shooting leaves 3 dead, 8 wounded

PARADISE, Pa. (CNN) -- A Pennsylvania milk truck driver shot and killed three girls at a one-room Amish schoolhouse Monday and wounded eight others before taking his own life over a 20-year-old grudge, the state police chief said.

All eight of the wounded were in critical condition at hospitals in Pennsylvania and Delaware, and two were in "very dire" condition Monday evening, State Police Commissioner Jeffrey Miller told reporters.

"It would take a miracle for us not to lose more lives today," he said.

Miller said Charles Carl Roberts IV was acting on a 20-year-old grudge when he went into the Georgetown School, about 60 miles west of Philadelphia. But investigators are still trying to find the details of what drove the 32-year-old man to barricade himself inside the school and begin shooting girls after letting the boys go. (Posted 6:33 p.m.)

Allen schedules televised speech to refocus Senate campaign

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- After weeks of allegations that he used racial slurs, embattled Republican Sen. George Allen will take to the Virginia airwaves Monday with a speech meant as a "turning point" in his re-election bid.

Allen's two-minute address, scheduled to air Monday evening, will be a "defining moment" of his race against former Navy Secretary Jim Webb, according to a top aide.

Allen has purchased the time for the speech, which is scheduled for broadcast at 7:58 p.m. on stations in five Virginia markets. Jessica Smith, a spokeswoman for Webb's campaign, said the Democratic camp would respond in a conference call with reporters afterward. (Posted 4:32 p.m.)

U.S. soldier killed in Baghdad

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- A U.S. soldier died Monday morning from wounds received in a small-arms attack in central Baghdad, the military said in a statement.

Since the start of the war, the U.S. military has suffered 2,719 fatalities in Iraq. (Posted 3:22 p.m.)

Florida lawmaker picked to replace Foley on ballot

ORLANDO, Fla. (CNN) -- Florida Rep. Joe Negron was selected on Monday by the Republican Party of Florida's Executive Board to replace former Rep. Mark Foley, who resigned Friday after reports surfaced about inappropriate e-mails he exchanged with former Congressional pages.

Jeff Sadosky, the director of communications for the RPOF said the vote was unanimous.

Negron, 45, is currently the representative of District 82 in the state legislature. He was first elected to the Florida House in 2000. (Posted 2:57 p.m.)

Hastert says he didn't know about 'vile and repulsive' messages until last week

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Speaker of the House Dennis Hastert said on Monday that he was not aware of the more explicit instant messages allegedly sent by former Rep. Mark Foley to a former page until last week, pushing back against fellow lawmakers who question when the GOP leadership learned of any potential problem with the Florida congressman.

"The instant messages reportedly between Congressman Foley and a former page sent in 2003 were vile and repulsive, both to myself and my colleagues," Hastert told reporters.

Hastert has acknowledged that he was made aware earlier this year about an e-mail Foley sent to a former page that was termed "over-friendly." (Posted 2:56 p.m.)

Police: 3 girls dead, 7 wounded in shooting at Amish school

PARADISE, Pa. (CNN) -- A Pennsylvania truck driver barricaded himself in a one-room Amish schoolhouse on Monday, killing three girls and wounding seven others before killing himself over what police said was a 20-year-old grudge.

Charles Carl Roberts IV, 32, of the nearby town of Bart, told his wife he was acting on a 20-year-old grudge, state police Commissioner Jeffrey Miller told reporters.

Roberts was armed with a shotgun and a semi-automatic pistol when he went into the Georgetown school, a one-room schoolhouse in the Amish country northwest of Philadelphia. He barricaded the doors, sent male students out and bound his female victims before shooting them execution-style by a blackboard, Miller said. (Posted 2:40 p.m.)

Police: Initial reports indicate gunman kills 3 at Amish school, before turning gun on himself

LANCASTER COUNTY, Pa. (CNN) -- Initial police reports indicate a gunman walked into a one-room Amish schoolhouse Monday, ordered some students to leave before opening fire on the remaining students, killing at least three before turning the gun on himself, Pennsylvania state police spokesman Jack Lewis told CNN.

A number of other children have been seriously injured, he said.

Lancaster General Hospital initially received three young patients, ages 6 to 15 -- one in critical condition -- and expects to receive three more patients soon, spokeswoman Kim Hatch told CNN shortly after 1 p.m.

The three initial patients were transferred to other hospitals: two to Hershey Medical Center and the other to Children's Hospital in Philadelphia, she said. (Posted 1:21 p.m.)

Kidnappers raid Baghdad computer stores, abduct 14; 7 dead, 32 wounded in Monday violence

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- For a second day, gunmen dressed as Iraqi government forces staged a mass kidnapping Monday, raiding several computer stores in central Baghdad and seizing at least 14 people, a Baghdad emergency police official told CNN.

The abductions were carried out by at least 25 gunmen dressed as Iraqi security forces. The kidnappers, traveling in seven vehicles, raided computer stores near Baghdad's Technology University around noon (5 a.m. ET).

On Sunday, at least 20 gunmen, several dressed like police commandos, kidnapped 26 workers from a Baghdad meat processing plant on Sunday, according to a Baghdad emergency police official. (Posted 11:31 a.m.)

Justices convene new term, dispose of hundreds on pending cases

From CNN Supreme Court Producer Bill Mears

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- With low-key ceremony and little substance, the Supreme Court began its new term Monday with a brief seven-minute session.

By law, the Court must convene the "First Monday in October," and Chief Justice John Roberts and six of his benchmates were to gavel in the term. No oral arguments were held because of the Yom Kippur holiday, and Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Stephen Breyer, both Jewish, were not present.

It is the second time the Court has officially put off hearing cases because of the Jewish "Day of Atonement."

Cases will be heard in public session Tuesday, beginning with an appeal over immigrant rights in criminal proceedings. Thirty-eight cases have been scheduled for oral argument so far, with a total of about 85 possible. This is the first full term for Justice Samuel Alito, who joined the bench in January. (Posted 11:28 a.m.)

Police: Schools on lockdown amid reports of a former student with gun

LAS VEGAS (CNN) -- Authorities put two schools in North Las Vegas on lockdown Monday amid reports that a former student brought a gun onto a high school campus, police said.

There were no reports of shots fired.

Police stationed at Mojave High School pursued the armed juvenile on foot into a nearby residential area, North Las Vegas police spokesman Tim Bedwell told CNN.

Swat teams and K-9 units have the neighborhood surrounded.

"We've got the area we believe he's in confined," Bedwell said.

The student brought a "long gun" on Mojave's campus, "maybe even an AK-47," Bedwell said.

Nearby Elizondo Elementary School was also placed on lockdown, as a precaution.

The situation is taking place in North Las Vegas, which is about seven miles north of downtown. (Posted 11:26 a.m.)

Foley says he's in treatment for alcoholism

From CNN National Correspondent Susan Candiotti

MIAMI (CNN) -- Former Congressman Mark Foley, who resigned Friday amid allegations that he sent inappropriate emails to teenage pages on Capitol Hill, told a Florida television station that he is being treated for alcoholism and is in a treatment facility, CNN confirmed Monday.

Foley's attorney David Roth said the letter Foley faxed to WPBF in West Palm Beach, Fla., was legitimate.

The fax was apparently sent from Clearwater, Fla., but Roth would not say if that's where Foley is being treated. (Posted 9:03 a.m.)

MOD: British soldier killed Sunday in southern Iraq

BASRA, Iraq (CNN) -- The British Ministry of Defense Monday confirmed the death of a British soldier, killed Sunday in the southern Iraqi city of Basra.

The soldier, a member of the Royal Army Medical Corps, died in an indirect fire attack on the Shaat Al Arab Hotel base in Basra, the MOD said.

Another soldier was seriously injured in the attack.

With the death, 117 British soldiers have died in the Iraq war. (Posted 8:16 a.m.)

Americans win Nobel Prize for Medicine

STOCKHOLM (CNN) -- Americans Andrew Z. Fire and Craig C. Mello won the Nobel Prize in Medicine "for their discovery of RNA interference -- gene silencing by double-stranded RNA," the organization's Web site said Monday.

According to the Nobel Foundation, the men "have discovered a fundamental mechanism for controlling the flow of genetic information."

Fire was born in 1959, and graduated with a doctorate in biology in 1983 from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in Cambridge, Mass. He is professor of pathology and genetics at Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, Calif. Mello, born in 1960, graduated with a doctorate in biology in 1990 from Harvard University. He is professor of molecular medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, Mass. (Posted 8:15 a.m.)

Hastert asks Justice to probe Foley case

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- House Speaker Dennis Hastert on Sunday asked the Justice Department to investigate how lawmakers handled allegations that a former Florida congressman sent inappropriate e-mail messages to teen-age congressional pages.

The rare move followed calls by Democratic leaders in the House of Representatives and Senate for an outside probe earlier Sunday, questioning whether the GOP leadership in the House had improperly squelched concerns about now-former Rep. Mark Foley's contact with the teens. FBI spokesman Richard Kolko said the bureau was looking into whether any federal laws have been violated in the matter, but had no further comment.

Foley resigned Friday and apologized to his family and his constituents amid scrutiny of his e-mail and instant-message contacts with pages. The six-term Florida congressman was co-chairman of the Missing and Exploited Children's Caucus and a prominent backer of legislation to crack down on online predators and criminalize child pornography on the Internet.

The House of Representatives voted on Friday to launch an investigation of Foley's dealings with pages. But in a letter to Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, Hastert urged the Justice Department on Sunday to look into who knew about the content of any sexually explicit messages involving Foley "and what actions such individuals took, if any, to provide them to law enforcement."

"I request that the scope of your investigation include any and all individuals who may have been aware of this matter -- be they members of Congress, employees of the House of Representatives or anyone outside the Congress," wrote Hastert, R-Ill.

Justice Department spokesman Brian Roehrkasse said the department "will review the speaker's letter and the issues raised in the letter to determine whether we can conduct an investigation." (Posted 7:49 a.m.)

Rival Palestinian factions meet to address Sunday's rioting in Gaza, W. Bank

GAZA CITY (CNN) -- Representatives from the two rival Palestinian factions, Hamas and Fatah, are meeting Monday to address the tensions that led to massive anti-government protests in Gaza and the West Bank a day earlier, Interior Minister Saeed Seyam said.

The Hamas-led Palestinian government also closed all of its ministries in the wake of Sunday's violence.

Demonstrations in Gaza on Sunday turned into violent street clashes, leaving at least nine people dead and 90 others wounded. There were no reports of injuries in the West Bank protests.

The rioting grew out of demonstrations against the cash-strapped Palestinian government led by the Islamic militant movement Hamas, which has been unable to pay police or other government workers for months.

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, the leader of the rival Fatah movement, appealed for calm and warning that the clashes could lead to "catastrophic" turmoil.

"I appeal to all factions to be responsible, to abandon their differences and to ensure dialogue, especially in the time we are facing an Israeli threat to reoccupy Gaza Strip," he said in a televised speech Sunday night.

Periodic clashes have rocked the streets of Gaza since Hamas won control of the Palestinian government earlier this year. Hamas refuses to recognize Israel's right to exist and has been designated as a terrorist organization by Israel, the United States and the European Union. All three cut off international aid to the Palestinian government after Hamas took control, demanding that it renounce terrorism and drop its call for the destruction of Israel.

Sunday's violence in Gaza began when Palestinian police took to the streets to protest seven months without a paycheck. Hamas sent its executive security force into the streets to confront the protesting police, security sources said.

Most Palestinian police and security forces are Fatah loyalists. But Abbas ordered all police and security forces to end their role in the demonstrations and demanded that Prime Minister Ismail Haniya's government end the crisis through "peaceful and democratic means."

In the West Bank, protesters broke into the Council of Ministers building in Ramallah housing the ministers' offices, set a fire and threw papers and files from the windows, the security sources told CNN. Video of the aftermath showed smoke coming out of the windows and scattered papers surrounding the building, but the outside of the building showed little damage.

Smoke from burning tires was seen rising near the parliament building in Gaza City, and sporadic gunfire could be heard.

Among those reported dead were a member of the presidential guard, a Hamas security officer, a police officer and a 15-year-old, the sources said. (Posted 7:31 a.m.)

Kidnappers raid Baghdad computer stores, abduct 14; Parliament extends martial law

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- For a second day, gunmen dressed as Iraqi government forces staged a mass kidnapping Monday, raiding several computer stores in central Baghdad and seizing at least 14 people, a Baghdad emergency police official told CNN.

The abductions were carried out by at least 25 gunmen dressed as Iraqi security forces. The kidnappers, traveling in seven vehicles, raided computer stores near Baghdad's Technology University around noon (5 a.m. ET).

On Sunday, at least 20 gunmen, several dressed like police commandos, kidnapped 26 workers from a Baghdad meat processing plant on Sunday, according to a Baghdad emergency police official.

The U.S. military unveiled new Iraqi police uniforms in August to prevent insurgents from pretending to be police and carrying out kidnappings and attacks.

The uniforms are scheduled to be distributed in early October.

Some insurgent attacks are believed to have been carried out by militia members who have been integrated into Iraq's security forces, but have not changed their loyalties.

In an effort to stem the lawlessness on the streets of Baghdad and across much of Iraq, the Iraqi parliament Monday voted to extend martial law until Nov. 1.

Martial law, which has been in effect for several months, includes a nighttime curfew and gives the government extra powers to make arrests without warrants and launch police and military operations when it deems necessary.

The law will cover all of Iraq except for the autonomous Kurdish areas in the north.

In other violence on Monday, two Iraqi policemen were killed and three other officers were wounded when gunmen ambushed their patrol in Kut al-Hay on Monday morning, a Kut health center official told CNN.

Kut al-Hay is located about about 125 miles (200 km) south of Baghdad.

Separately, the Kut morgue Monday received five bodies that were recovered from the town of Suwayra a day earlier. Three of the bodies had been decapitated.

Police believe the killings are typically the result of Sunni-Shiite sectarian violence.

Kut is about 40 miles (60 km) south of Baghdad.

-- From CNN' s Mohammed Tawfeeq (Posted 6:57 a.m.)

Rice: Iran not prepared to suspend uranium enrichment

SHANNON, Ireland (CNN) -- U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said she's seen nothing to indicate that Iran is prepared to suspend uranium enrichment.

Her comments came Monday during a re-fueling stop in Shannon, Ireland, en route to the Middle East.

"I think it's fair to say that we have not yet heard anything that suggests the Iranians are going to suspend," Rice said.

"In fact, you've probably have seen the statements to the contrary from the Iranian President."

On Saturday, President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said Iran will not give up its right to nuclear technology, Iran's Islamic Republic News Agency reported.

On her trip to the Middle East, Rice is scheduled to travel to Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Israel and the Palestinian Territories. (Posted 4:20 a.m.)

2 Iraqi police die in Kut al-Hay; 5 bodies found in Suwayra

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- Two Iraqi police were killed and three other officers were wounded when gunmen ambushed their patrol in Kut al-Hay on Monday morning, a Kut health center official told CNN.

Kut al-Hay is located about about 125 miles (200 km) south of Baghdad.

Separately, the Kut morgue Monday received five bodies that were recovered from the town of Suwayra a day earlier.

Three of the bodies had been decapitated.

Police believe the killings are typically the result of Sunni-Shiite sectarian violence. Kut is about 40 miles (60 km) south of Baghdad. (Posted 4:20 a.m.)

3 U.S. Marines die in Iraq

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- A trio of U.S. Marines died Sunday in Anbar province, west of Baghdad, a U.S. military release said.

"One Marine assigned to Regimental Combat Team 5 and one Marine assigned to 1st Marine Expeditionary Force Headquarters Group died from injuries sustained due to enemy action," the statement released Monday said.

"One Marine assigned to 1st Marine Expeditionary Force Headquarters Group died from a non-combat related vehicle accident."

Since the start of the war, the U.S. military has suffered 2,717 fatalities in Iraq. (Posted 2 a.m.)

Lula faces runoff in Brazil presidential vote

SAO PAULO, Brazil (CNN) -- Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva fell short of outright re-election Sunday but will head into an Oct. 29 runoff leading his closest rival.

With 98 percent of the votes in, the socialist da Silva -- commonly known as "Lula" -- had just 48.8 percent of the vote. Aides to the onetime shoe-shine-boy-turned-trade activist told reporters that Lula would have to face a second round of balloting in four weeks.

Social Democrat Geraldo Alckmin had 41.4 percent of the vote after a strong showing in Brazil's most populous state, Sao Paulo, where he served as governor from 2001 to early 2006. Lula polled well in the poorer northeast, where his expanded social spending has had the greatest impact. (Posted 11:15 p.m.)

Hastert seeks Foley probe; FBI eyes ex-congressman

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- House Speaker Dennis Hastert on Sunday asked the Justice Department to investigate how lawmakers handled allegations that a former Florida congressman exchanged e-mail messages with a former congressional page.

The rare move followed calls by Democratic leaders in the House of Representatives and Senate for an outside probe earlier Sunday, questioning whether the GOP leadership in the House had improperly squelched concerns about now-former Rep. Mark Foley's contact with the teen. FBI spokesman Richard Kolko said the bureau was looking into whether any federal laws have been violated in the matter, but had no further comment.

Foley resigned Friday and apologized to his family and his constituents amid scrutiny of his e-mail and instant-message contacts with pages. The six-term Florida Republican was co-chairman of the Missing and Exploited Children's Caucus and a prominent backer of legislation to crack down on online predators and criminalize child pornography on the Internet. (Posted 10:15 p.m.)


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