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Thursday, June 22

Editor's Note: The CNN Wire is a running log of the latest news from CNN World Headquarters, reported by CNN's correspondents and producers, and The CNN Wire editors. "Posted" times are Eastern Daylight.

Sources: Suspects are black Muslims

MIAMI (CNN) -- Sources also told CNN that the suspects arrested in Thursday's raids were all radical black Muslims and at least one of them had taken an oath to serve al Qaeda. (Posted 9:55 p.m.)

Sources: Sears Tower, FBI building in Miami possible terror targets

MIAMI (CNN) -- Seven people were in custody Thursday as FBI agents and police carried out raids against an alleged terrorist plot that may have included the Sears Tower in Chicago and Miami's FBI offices as possible targets, law enforcement sources said.

Sources also told CNN that the suspects believed they were dealing with an al Qaeda operative who was actually a government informant.

One suspect was arrested before Thursday, officials said, and one of Thursday's arrests took place in Atlanta.

The 110-story Sears Tower in Chicago is the world's third-tallest building and the tallest in North America. Another source told CNN's Susan Candiotti that other structures also may have been targets. (Posted 9:43 p.m.)

U.S. gathered financial data from international firm to track terrorists

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- In an effort to track the flow of terrorist money in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, the Treasury Department obtained data from an international cooperative that transmits information between financial institutions worldwide, both the department and the cooperative confirmed Thursday.

However, Treasury Secretary John Snow insisted the program was "consistent with our democratic values and legal traditions" and did not amount to "data mining or trolling through the private financial records of Americans."

SWIFT -- or the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication -- issued a statement Thursday confirming it had "responded to compulsory subpoenas" from the Treasury Department after 9/11. (Posted 9:21 p.m.)

Official: Seven in custody from terror raids in Miami area

MIAMI (CNN) -- There were seven people in custody Thursday as FBI agents and state and local police carried out anti-terrorism raids in the Miami area, and no weapons or bomb-making materials had been found, law enforcement officials said.

One of the arrests was made before Thursday, officials said.

FBI spokesman Rich Kolko said there was at least one search warrant executed in the investigation. (Posted 9:01 p.m.)

Pentagon says sea-based missile defense test succeeds

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Amid international concerns about a new North Korean missile test, the Pentagon announced Thursday that a U.S. warship successfully knocked down a short-range missile fired from Hawaii.

An interceptor rocket fired from the guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh knocked down the warhead from a target missile about 250 miles off Kauai shortly after noon (6 p.m. ET), the Defense Department's missile defense agency reported. It was the seventh successful test of a sea-based missile defense system in eight attempts, the Pentagon said.

A Japanese warship took part in the exercise as well, using its radar to track the test missile, the Pentagon said. Its participation marks the first time a U.S. ally has taken part in a sea-based missile defense test. (Posted 8:27 p.m.)

FBI raids in Miami area target suspected terror activities

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- FBI agents were raiding locations in the Miami area and at least one other city Thursday night in connection with possible domestic terror activities, law enforcement sources said.

The FBI said a search warrant was being executed in the Liberty City area of Miami. Officials said no weapons or bomb-making materials had been found in the searches so far.

FBI Director Robert Mueller was to appear on CNN's "Larry King Live" at 9 p.m. (Posted 7:47 p.m.)

DNA test results confirm identities of two soldiers killed by insurgents

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The Pentagon said Thursday that results of DNA tests leave no doubt that the booby-trapped and mutilated bodies found Monday were two U.S. soldiers who were kidnapped and slain by insurgents in Iraq. Pfc. Kristian Menchaca, 23, of Houston and Pfc. Thomas L. Tucker, 25, of Madras, Ore., had been missing since a Friday attack on a checkpoint in Yusufiya, south of Baghdad. A third soldier -- Spc. David J. Babineau, 25, of Springfield, Mass. -- was killed in the attack. (Posted: 620 p.m.)

AT&T privacy policy changes removes key reference

NEW YORK (CNN) -- The telecommunications giant AT&T announced Thursday a privacy policy overhaul that removes a key reference from its previous policy, which had said the company "does not access, read, upload or store data contained in or derived from private files without the members' authorization..."

AT&T spokeswoman Tiffany Nels initially told CNN Thursday that the privacy clause above was included under the "diagnostics section" of the new policy, but a CNN review of the policy did not reveal any such reference.

Asked about the missing reference, she then said that it been removed in order to clarify the policy and make it easier for customers to understand. "We have never looked at our customers' files, or e-mails, photos or personal information, so this is not an issue. This is simply a matter of streamlining information," Nels said. (Posted: 6 p.m.)

Planned Parenthood to appeal Ohio court's orders to release abortion files

CNN) -- A Planned Parenthood official said Thursday the organization will appeal an Ohio judge's order that one of its clinics release medical records pertaining to abortions performed on girls under the age of 18. The records are being sought in a civil suit brought by the girl's parents against a Cincinnati clinic that performed an abortion on their 13-year-old daughter, whose name has not been made public.

The suit charges Planned Parenthood with performing the procedure without first seeking consent from the girl's parents, as Ohio law requires. Planned Parenthood will appeal on privacy grounds, said Becki Brenner, the organization's regional president. "We're providing reproductive services to minors within the parameters of Ohio law," Brenner said. "They want medical records for people who have no voice in this proceeding," she added. (Posted: 6 p.m.)

General: Iraqi insurgents getting more help from Iran

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The number of terrorist attacks across southern Iraq supported by Iranian covert forces has grown, although there is no evidence that there are Iranians inside Iraq fomenting the violence, the U.S. commanding general in Iraq said Thursday.

"Since January, we have seen an upsurge in their support, particularly to the Shia extremist groups," Gen. George Casey told reporters during a joint news conference with Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. "We are quite confident that the Iranians, through their covert Special Operations forces, are providing weapons, IED (improvised explosive device)technology and training to Shia extremist groups in Iraq (with) the training being conducted in Iran and, in some cases, probably in Lebanon," Casey said.

"I have no evidence that there are Iranians in Iraq that are actually directing attacks. They are providing the material to Shia extremist groups that operate as their surrogates," Casey added. (Posted: 5:12 p.m.)

Sources: Ramallah gunfight leaves 1 Palestinian dead

RAMALLAH, West Bank (CNN) -- The Israeli Army Thursday shot and killed a member of the Palestinian military intelligence services in Ramallah, Palestinian security sources said. The Israel Defense Forces said that gunmen opened fire on an IDF force in Ramallah, and the soldiers shot back, hitting one of the gunmen. (Posted: 4 p.m.)

Islamic militia reaches cease-fire with Somalia's interim government

(CNN) -- Somalia's transitional government and the Islamic militia that seized control of the war-torn capital Mogadishu have signed a cease-fire in which the two factions agree to work together, a government representative said Thursday.

The Islamic Courts Union, which wrested control of Mogadishu from a U.S.-backed coalition of secular warlords earlier this month, has agreed to recognize the transitional government as part of the deal, said Dahil Murray, an aide to transitional president Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed. "They have to agreed to work together to work for the good of Somalia," Murray said.

The two sides are to meet again July 15 in the Sudanese capital Khartoum. Somalia's last functioning government collapsed in 1991. The U.N.-backed transitional government, based in the inland city of Baidoa, wields little power. (Posted: 4 p.m.)

FEC fines Edwards presidential campaign, donor

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The Federal Election Commission Thursday fined former Sen. John Edwards' 2004 presidential campaign and an Edwards donor a total of $59,500 for soliciting and accepting illegal campaign contributions and other violations of the Federal Election Campaign Act, which governs the campaigns of candidates for federal office.

The donor, Tab Turner, solicited four $2,000 contributions from his co-workers at a Little Rock, Ark., law firm in January 2003 and illegally reimbursed them for their contributions using a company credit card. He also used a company credit card to make an illegal campaign contribution in his own name, and also to pay for various campaign expenses.

Federal law prohibits donors from making contributions in others' names, and prohibits direct corporate contributions to a federal candidate. Turner and his firm, Turner and Associates, P.A., were fined $50,000 in a civil penalty. The 2004 Edwards for President campaign agreed not to contest the FEC's ruling and to pay a $9,500 fine. (Posted: 4 p.m.)

Rumsfeld: No decision yet on U.S. troop reduction in Iraq

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld said Thursday that any recommendation on reducing U.S. troop levels in Iraq would come from the commanding general in Iraq, Gen. George Casey, after he consults with the nation's new government ministers and other officials. Rumsfeld told a news conference that reports Thursday that Casey is mulling cuts that would gradually reduce troop levels was not correct. (Posted: 4 p.m.)

Police believe suspect in shootings of wife, judge is in Mexico

(CNN) -- A man police believe fatally shot his estranged wife and wounded a family court judge in Reno, Nev., earlier this month is thought to have fled to Mexico, authorities said Thursday.

Darren Roy Mack, 45, faces charges of murder with the use of a deadly weapon in the death of Charla Mack, 39. In addition, Reno Police Chief Mike Poehlman said Thursday that authorities have probable cause to arrest Mack in the shooting of Judge Chuck Weller -- who was presiding over the couple's bitter divorce.

Weller, 53, was shot by a sniper using a high-velocity weapon while in his third-floor office of the Reno Justice Court Building on June 12. His wounds were not life-threatening. Washoe County District Attorney Dick Gammick said Mack had been talking with him, starting with a call on Monday. (Posted: 4 p.m.)

Wildfires continue to stretch across the west

(CNN) -- Rising smoke throughout the western United States Thursday proved wildfires have not been quelled, despite the concentrated efforts of fire officials in New Mexico, Colorado, California and Arizona.

The Brins Fire in central Arizona just south of Flagstaff and two miles northeast of the red hills of Sedona grew overnight nearly 800 acres, bringing the total land burned there to 3,250 acres. Nine helicopters and nearly 700 firefighters armed with hard hats and chainsaws worked under a blanket of smoke, increasing the containment to 7 percent, up from 5 percent Wednesday, said Jennifer Smith, a spokeswoman for the National Fire Information Center.

Late Thursday, a small plane spread red flame retardant chemicals over sections of the forest. All 500 homes in Oak Creek Canyon had been evacuated Wednesday but some residents were allowed to return to their homes Thursday, said Brins Fire spokesman Don Carpenter. (Posted: 4 p.m.)

Senate rejects Democratic calls for Iraq pullout

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The Senate on Thursday rejected Democratic calls for the Bush administration to begin withdrawing U.S. troops from Iraq, with one leading Republican warning that the "basic credibility" of the United States was at risk.

A measure backed by the Democratic leadership that would have required President Bush to start withdrawing troops by year's end failed 60-39, while another that would have required American combat troops to leave by July 2007 died 86-13.

Democrats have argued that the Bush administration has mismanaged the 3-year-old war and that a change in strategy was necessary. "We owe it to these troops, and all of our forces serving in Iraq, to develop a sound policy," Minority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said. "We hear a lot of rhetoric about supporting the troops, but the best way we can support them is with a smart strategy -- not with more rhetoric or slogans."

But Sen. John Warner, the chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said both Democratic amendments "would indicate there's some wavering, some equivocation here at home in supporting our president." "That goes to the basic credibility of the United States of America, which is on the line in these votes," said Warner, R-Va. (Posted: 2:07 p.m.)

Illegal immigrants seeking permanent residency suffer high court defeat

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A Mexican national lost his appeal Thursday at the Supreme Court, which upheld a deportation order that prevented the former illegal immigrant from remaining in the United States and seeking legal residency.

The justices voted 8-1 that a 1996 federal law tightening restrictions on illegal immigrants applied to Humberto Fernandez-Vargas. He had been in the United States for years prior to the passage of the Illegal Immigration and Immigrant Responsibility Act, which took away the right to appeal a pending deportation order.

The court concluded even long-time illegal immigrants were not immune, because the simple act of remaining in the United States represented "an indefinitely continuing violation" of their immigration status. (Posted: 12:42 p.m.)

Cheney: Iraq pullout would be 'the worst possible thing we could do'

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Withdrawing American troops from Iraq would be "the worst possible thing we could do," Vice President Dick Cheney told CNN Thursday, and predicted if that the United States were to carry out such an act, the country would still be vulnerable to terrorists.

"The worst possible thing we could do is what the Democrats are suggesting," Cheney told Chief National Correspondent John King in an exclusive interview at the vice president's residence. "And no matter how you carve it -- you can call it anything you want -- but basically, it is packing it in, going home, persuading and convincing and validating the theory that the Americans don't have the stomach for this fight."

Some Democrats have advocated an immediate withdrawal of U.S. troops from Iraq. Others have pushed for a phased troop withdrawal. (Posted: 12:41 p.m.)

Bush delivers speech in Budapest to honor 50th anniversary of Hungarian uprising

BUDAPEST, Hungary (CNN) -- Fifty years after Hungary defeated Soviet forces, President Bush stood upon a hill overlooking Budapest Thursday and paralleled the fledgling democracy in Iraq to the early years of a democratic Hungary.

"The lessons are clear: liberty can be delayed but it cannot be denied," Bush said. "As people across the world step forth to claim their own freedom they will take inspiration from your own example."

He added that the Hungarian sacrifice 50 years ago inspires everyone and that the United States appreciates the troop support Hungary has offered to help strengthen a "vital region of the world."

Bush's one-day visit comes after the U.S. leader attended a European Union summit in Vienna, Austria. He will return to the United States later in the day.

During his visit, Bush met with Hungarian President Laszlo Solyom (prono: Las-low Show-lyoom), Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany (prono: Fer-ence Jur-shahn-ee), as well as other political leaders, before his speech at the monument to the Hungarian uprising which began in October 1956. (Posted 11:32 a.m.)

Diyala governor injured, driver and bodyguard killed in Baquba accident

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- The governor of restive Diyala province was injured and his driver and a bodyguard were killed Thursday in a traffic mishap in Baquba, authorities in Baquba told CNN.

Raad Rashid Mulla Jawad was heading home from work around 3:15 p.m. when a tire puncture caused the vehicle he was in to overturn, according to comments from police and a Diyala provincial official.

Jawad was flown by a U.S. military helicopter to a military hospital in Balad.

Police believe the mishap is the result of a traffic accident and not foul play, but they are investigating the incident.

A mixed Sunni-Shiite province northeast of Baghdad, Diyala and its provincial capital of Baquba has endured years of insurgent and sectarian violence.

From Producer Mohammed Tawfeeq (Posted 11:24 a.m.)

U.S. general mulling modest troop reduction in Iraq

From Pentagon Correspondent Barbara Starr

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The U.S. commanding general in Iraq is considering recommending a small reduction in troop levels, military sources told CNN.

Gen. George Casey is mulling a cut that would gradually reduce, at most, the equivalent of as many as two brigades -- an estimated 6,000 to 10,000 troops. The United States now has about 127,000 troops in Iraq.

Sources emphasize it would most likely be a gradual move and could involve postponing or delaying troop rotations by the end of the year, as opposed to a direct pullout.

There would be a lot of options for Casey to make adjustments to the plan, depending on how he sees the security situation evolve.

Casey and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld briefed key lawmakers in closed-door breakfast meetings on Thursday. (Posted 10:38 a.m.)

2 dead, 5 wounded in central Baghdad car bombing

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- A car bomb detonated near a movie theater in central Baghdad on Thursday, killing two people and wounding five others, emergency police told CNN.

The bomb detonated about 5:40 p.m. near the Baghdad Movie Theatre in the Alawi commercial area.

From Producer Mohammed Tawfeeq (Posted 10:23 a.m.)

U.S. general mulling modest troop reduction in Iraq

From Pentagon Correspondent Barbara Starr

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The U.S. commanding general in Iraq is considering recommending a small reduction in troop levels, military sources told CNN.

Gen. George Casey is mulling a cut that would slice two brigades -- an estimated 6,000 to 10,000 troops. The United States now has about 127,000 troops in Iraq.

Sources said it would be a gradual move, and could involve postponing or delaying troop rotations as opposed to a direct pullout.

Casey and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld briefed key lawmakers in closed-door breakfast meetings on Thursday. (Posted 10:20 a.m.)

With addition of crystal emblem, Israel now part of the Red Cross movement

(CNN) -- Israel is now part of the Red Cross movement, ending a longstanding dispute over the nature of the emblem with the admittance of the Jewish state's Magen David Adom society.

The 29th International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent on Thursday changed statutes of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent movement "to incorporate the additional emblem of the red crystal, which now has the same status as the red cross and red crescent."

The red crystal enables Israel to retain its red star of David instead of having to adopt the red cross or crescent used by other societies and combine it with the red star to create a new logo. Any society in the world can combine the emblem with the cross or crescent.

This has led to the Red Cross recognition of the Magen David Adom Society. The Palestine Red Crescent Society was also recognized. The Red Cross says it will admit both the Israeli and Palestinian societies into the movement. (Posted 9:19 a.m.)

Rescue workers search for 54 missing after ferry capsizes off Sumatra

JAKARTA (CNN) -- Rescuers Thursday are searching for 54 people missing after a ferry sank off the coast of Indonesia's Sumatra Island, a spokesman for the rescue team said.

So far, rescuers have found 80 survivors, the spokesman said.

A 13-foot (2 m) wave generated by a storm capsized the boat Thursday morning local time, with 134 registered passengers -- including three Americans and one other foreigner -- and 12 crew members aboard.

The ferry was transporting passengers from Sibolga Island to Nias Island.(Posted 9:18 a.m.)

Iraqi officials: Kidnappers release some Iraqi factory workers, kill 2

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- After kidnapping about 80 Iraqis as they left work Wednesday afternoon, the kidnappers released nearly half of them -- mostly women and Sunni Arabs -- and killed two, according to Iraqi officials.

The two bodies were found late Wednesday in Taji, north of Baghdad, where the initial abduction took place hours earlier, a Baghdad emergency police official said.

Both were shot, he said.

About 30 minutes after the abduction, the kidnappers released 16 women, dropping them off about a kilometer from the Nasr al-Adhim factory, where they worked, according to Iraq's Industry Minister Fawzi al-Hariri.

Several hours later, 30 others were freed -- most of them Sunnis, police said.

Iraqi authorities believe the kidnappers are still holding at least 30 employees at an unknown location.

The workers had just loaded onto four buses at the end of their shift Wednesday when the gunmen commandeered the vehicles in Taji at 3 p.m., an Iraqi police official said.

At least 40 gunmen in four vehicles were involved in the attack on the buses which were headed to several Shiite neighborhoods in Baghdad, al-Hariri said.

The factory employed 4,000 people but because of the security situation, only 1,500 are still working there, al-Hariri said.

The factory makes school benches and blackboards and it produced plastic containers during the regime of Saddam Hussein, the police official said.

--From CNN's Mohammed Tawfeeq (Posted 9:16 a.m.)

British Airways under investigation for alleged price fixing

LONDON (CNN) -- British and U.S. regulators are investigating alleged price fixing of passenger fares and fuel surcharges by British Airways and other airlines, according to a statement issued Thursday from British Airways.

The London-based airline said it was cooperating with Britain's Office of Fair Trading (OFT) and the U.S. Department of Justice in their probe of possible cartel activities.

BA also said two of its senior managers -- commercial director, Martin George, and head of communications, Iain Burns -- had been given leave of absence during the investigation.

In its statement, BA said it would follow its policy "to conduct its business in full compliance with all applicable competition laws."

The OFT said it had visited BA's business offices on June 13 "as part of an investigation into alleged price co-ordination by airlines in relation to fuel surcharges for long haul passenger flights to and from the UK." (Posted 9:15 a.m.)

Afghan president calls for al-Zawahiri's arrest, says he may be in Afghanistan

(CNN) -- Responding to a recent message to the Afghan people from al-Qaeda's No. 2 figure, Afghan President Hamid Karzai Thursday hinted that Ayman al-Zawahiri may be within his country's borders and called for his arrest.

"Ayman al-Zawahiri is one of those people that we are looking for in Afghanistan to capture," Karzai said. "He's been the cause of destruction in Afghanistan, he and his friends, the other terrorists who are training their guns on Afghan lives."

The video message from al-Zawahiri was posted on Islamic Web sites Wednesday evening.

In the video, al-Zawahiri, speaking in Arabic, addresses his message to the people of Afghanistan and talks about what he terms "crimes against the Afghan people by the Americans." (Posted, 6:32 a.m.)

4 U.S. soldiers killed while battling militants in eastern Afghanistan

(CNN) -- Four U.S. soldiers were killed and another wounded Wednesday during a battle with militants inside Afghanistan near the Pakistan border, the U.S. military said.

The battle -- part of the ongoing "Operation Mountain Lion" -- happened in the northern part of Nuristan Province along the mountainous border area where suspected Taliban and al Qaeda remnants are suspected of taking refuge.

Coalition forces attacked enemy positions in a remote area of the Kamdesh District, when the soldiers were killed.

The operation continued into Wednesday night, in the air and on the ground, the military said. (Posted, 5:50 a.m.)

Kidnappers release some Iraqi factory workers after brazen attack

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- Shortly after kidnapping about 80 Iraqis as they left work Wednesday afternoon, the kidnappers released nearly half of them -- mostly women and Sunni Arabs -- Iraq's Industry Minister Fawzi al-Hariri told CNN Thursday.

He said between 30 and 35 employees are still being held at an unknown location.

The workers had just loaded onto four buses at the end of their shift when the gunmen commandeered the vehicles in Taji, north of Baghdad at 3 p.m. Wednesday, an Iraqi police official said. (Posted, 5:50 a.m.)

Rescue workers search for 116 missing after boat capsizes off Sumatra

JAKARTA (CNN) -- Rescuers Thursday are searching for 116 people missing after a passenger boat sank off the coast of Indonesia's Sumatra Island, a spokesman for the rescue team said.

So far, rescuers have found four survivors, the spokesman said.

A 13-foot (2 m) wave generated by a storm capsized the boat Thursday morning local time, with 108 registered passengers -- including three Americans and one other foreigner -- and 12 crew members aboard. (Posted, 5:50 a.m.)

Bush arrives in Budapest to honor 50th anniversary of Hungarian uprising

BUDAPEST, Hungary (CNN) -- President Bush arrived in Budapest Thursday, where he will deliver a speech commemorating the 50th anniversary of Hungary's revolution against Soviet rule.

The one-day visit comes after the U.S. leader attended a European Union summit in Vienna, Austria. He will return to the United States later in the day.

During his visit, Bush will meet with Hungarian President Laszlo Solyom, Prime Minister Ferenc Gyurcsany, as well as other political leaders, before his speech at the monument to the Hungarian uprising which began in October 1956.

Bush's address is expected to be closely watched by Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has expressed his displeasure with recent U.S. comments accusing Moscow of rolling back on democracy and strong-arming its ex-Soviet neighbors. (Updated, 5:15 a.m.)

U.S. military reports 5 troops killed in recent attacks

BAGHDAD (CNN) -- The U.S. military Thursday reported the deaths of five U.S. service members in recent attacks near Baghdad and in the western Anbar province.

Three Marines assigned to Regimental Combat Team 5 died when their vehicle hit a roadside bomb in Anbar; another Marine assigned to the 1st Marine Expeditionary Force died "after being attacked while conducting security operations," a military release stated.

The military also reported that a U.S. soldier assigned to Multi-National Division Baghdad died Wednesday morning when his vehicle struck a roadside bomb south of the Iraqi capital around 11:30 a.m. (3:30 a.m. ET).

With the deaths, 2,510 U.S. military personnel have died in the Iraq War. (Updated, 6:43 a.m.)

Major blazes on the move in parts of western United States

(CNN) -- Fed by drought, wildfires continue to move across parts of the the western United States, devouring acreage in four Western states.

In central Arizona just south of Flagstaff, a 2,456-acre fire has forced authorities to evacuate all 500 homes in Oak Creek Canyon, officials said. No homes or structures have been lost.

In southern Colorado, a 9,000-acre fire just west of Pueblo led officials to evacuate 280 structures, a fire official said.

In California's Los Padres National Forest, about five miles west of Cuyama, a 13,425-acre fire was threatening oil fields, natural gas lines and commercial resources.

And in Gila National Forest, in southwestern New Mexico, a 24,300-acre fire was zero percent contained 17 miles northeast of Glenwood, according to the National Fire Information Center.

So far this year, wildfires have swept across 3,123,689 acres nationwide, more than four times last year's total for the same time period, the information center said. (Postd, 12:50 a.m. Thursday)

Floods, landslides kill at least 200 in central Indonesia

JAKARTA (CNN) -- Four days of heavy rains in Indonesia have triggered deadly floods and landslides, killing 200 people while another 130 are still missing, the disaster task force in southern Sulewesi Province said Thursday.

Of the total number of deaths, 184 occurred in the Sinjai district of Sulawesi. More than 100 homes have been destroyed or severely damaged in the central Indonesian province, officials said.

In some areas, the floodwaters are more than 6 feet deep, the Social Affairs Ministry said Wednesday. The ministry has sent medicine, blankets and other relief supplies to the area, and local officials formed search-and-rescue teams to find the missing. -- From CNN's Andy Saputra in Jakarta (Updated, 3:16 a.m.)

New al-Zawahiri video posted on Islamic Web sites

(CNN) -- A new video message from the No. 2 figure in al Qaeda, Ayman al-Zawahiri, was posted on Islamic Web sites Wednesday evening.

In the video, al-Zawahiri, speaking in Arabic, addresses his message to the people of Afghanistan and talks about what he terms "crimes against the Afghan people by the Americans."

He claims to have recorded the message, which lasts 3 minutes and 44 seconds, the day after deadly riots in Kabul on May 29, and he calls on young men in Kabul's universities to rise up and "join in with the mujahidin forces in attacking the invaders and freeing Muslim Afghanistan."

Al-Zawahiri does not mention the death of Iraqi al Qaeda leader Musab al-Zarqawi, who was killed in a U.S. airstrike on June 7. (Posted 10:45 p.m.)

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