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Businessman with a need for speed

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David Aspin's Ferrari on the streets of Florence.

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(CNN) -- For most commuters the journey to work is a daily drudgery of traffic jams and train delays to be endured rather than enjoyed.

But British businessman and car enthusiast David Aspin looks forward to the drive to work -- even though his office is 1,750 kilometers (1,087 miles) from home.

While Aspin chooses to live in Florence, Italy, his property development company is based in Leeds in the north of England. Shunning the fashion for budget airlines, Aspin prefers to make his regular cross-continent commute behind the wheel of his Ferrari 612 Scaglietti.

"I remember I was catching the ferry at Dover one day and saw a guy arriving in a Ferrari when I was in my little Citroen 2CV," Aspin recalls. "I thought, 'wow, how incredible; I would love to do that one day."

Aspin makes the trip around once a month, treating his car as a mobile office by conducting conference calls en route. At a leisurely pace it takes a couple of days. At a push, he says he can do it in one.

"I'm one of the few people that uses their Ferraris," he said. "A lot of buyers, they look at them and don't get out and use the things. I really give mine a good pasting up and down the autobahns in Germany and drive them at high speed which is what they're made for.

"And actually one thing I find with these cars is the more you use them, the better they get, they really enjoy being used. A Ferrari sitting in a garage is not a happy Ferrari."

Aspin replaces his Ferrari every six months due to the heavy mileage, selling each car on before its value depreciates. As a regular customer, he visits the Italian car manufacturer's famous Maranello headquarters to see each car being made and collect each one as it rolls out of the factory.

Synonymous with Italian elegance and craftsmanship, just 5,000 cars bearing the legendary prancing horse badge are hand-built each year.

"The thing I really enjoy about visiting the factory is the sense of camaraderie you get with the people who are building the cars and that is really special," says Aspin, who has each car tailored to his own specifications.

Few Ferraris are the same, with paint colors, interiors and mechanical features all modifiable at extra cost. What does come as standard is the V12 engine which can accelerate from 0 to 100 kilometers an hour in just 4.2 seconds.

And while many owners may be attracted by the exclusivity and social status attached to driving around in a car with a $300,000 price tag, for Aspin the prestige is outweighed by its performance on the road.

"It's not just about belonging to an elite. For me Ferrari has an engineering integrity which rises above the rest.

"Obviously if you own a Ferrari you're an enthusiast and people do buy cars to convey their position in life, but personally I buy them because I love the engineering integrity. It's a superb piece of motoring and a big presence on the road."

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