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Twin to kidnappers: Let my sister go

Carroll family has received no leads on journalist's abduction

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WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The twin sister of kidnapped American journalist Jill Carroll pleaded Wednesday for her captors to let her go and for anyone who has knowledge of her whereabouts to share it with authorities.

"We would be grateful for any new sign that Jill is well," Katie Carroll said Wednesday, almost three months after her sister was captured in Baghdad while freelancing for The Christian Science Monitor.

Katie Carroll also expressed hope that those holding the 28-year-old "have come to know her; that they recognize what a wonderful person she is and realize they could show the world they are merciful to an innocent woman by returning her home to us." (Watch Carroll's twin plead for her freedom -- 1:48)

The Carroll family has received no concrete leads since Jill was abducted after attempting to interview Iraqi politician Adnan al-Dulaimi in western Baghdad on January 7.

After discovering the politician was not at his office, Jill Carroll, her driver and interpreter left, only to be stopped by the kidnappers, who killed Carroll's interpreter. Her driver escaped.

The Arabic-language network Al-Jazeera and Kuwaiti television station Alrai have aired videos of Jill Carroll, and the kidnappers, purportedly a group called Swords of Righteousness Brigades, have twice set deadlines for their demands to be met -- that all female prisoners in U.S. and Iraqi custody be released.

"We've had no information at all. It's very frustrating and we're very eager for anyone who has any information to reach out, which is why I'm doing the appeal today -- to see if there is any new information or anyone who is willing to help us," Katie Carroll said.

Katie Carroll insisted that her sister was a friend of the Iraqi people who "has many Iraqi friends and respects their culture."

She also alluded to the captors' demands, saying that Jill "always had special praise for the strength and resilience of Iraqi women and mothers."

Jill Carroll has been reporting in Iraq for about three years, and several Muslim clerics and politicians, including al-Dulaimi, have issued statements calling for her release.

Last month, Jill's captors told Alrai that Carroll is being held at a "safe house" in central Baghdad owned by one of the abductors and lives with a group of women with whom she is "sharing the house chores."

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