Skip to main content
Search
Services
INSIDE POLITICS

Poll: Most think GOP, Democrats lack vision

YOUR E-MAIL ALERTS

Politics
Senate

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- By a large number, most Americans lack faith in the ability of Democrats or Republicans to solve the nation's problems, a CNN/USA Today/Gallup Poll released Wednesday indicates.

Sixty-eight percent of people surveyed February 9-12 said Democrats had no clear plan for the country, while 67 percent said Republicans lacked one.

Nevertheless, most of the respondents -- 52 percent -- said things are going very or fairly well in the country, a statistically similar response (49 percent) to the last time the question was asked in November.

The sampling error for questions asked of all 1,000 respondents was plus or minus 3 percentage points.

But many respondents said something made them upset about the direction the country was headed. Fifty-nine percent said they were angry about the way the country was moving along, while 32 percent answered they were generally content.

When asked if President Bush had done anything to make them mad, 61 percent of the people surveyed said yes.

The questions, asked of smaller samples, had a sampling error of plus or minus 5 percentage points.

With midterm elections approaching in November, 50 percent of registered voters said they would vote for a Democratic candidate, while 43 percent said Republican and 8 percent said they were undecided or would vote for another party's candidate. The question had a sampling error of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

When asked which of six potential 2008 presidential candidates they would vote for, registered Democrats picked Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton of New York (39 percent) ahead of Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts (15 percent), former Vice President Al Gore (13 percent) and former vice presidential candidate John Edwards (12 percent).

Among Republican registered voters, former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Sen. John McCain of Arizona -- 33 percent and 28 percent, respectively -- were the clear favorites. Sen. George Allen of Virginia trailed behind with 7 percent, followed by Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist of Tennessee with 6 percent.

That question had a sampling error of plus or minus 5 percentage points.

Fifty-eight percent of the respondents would like to see more spending on domestic issues such as health care and education and less focus on cutting the deficit. The question on spending had a sampling error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

Story Tools
Subscribe to Time for $1.99 cover
Top Stories
Get up-to-the minute news from CNN
CNN.com gives you the latest stories and video from the around the world, with in-depth coverage of U.S. news, politics, entertainment, health, crime, tech and more.
Top Stories
Get up-to-the minute news from CNN
CNN.com gives you the latest stories and video from the around the world, with in-depth coverage of U.S. news, politics, entertainment, health, crime, tech and more.
Search JobsMORE OPTIONS


 
Search
© 2007 Cable News Network.
A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines. Contact us. Site Map.
Offsite Icon External sites open in new window; not endorsed by CNN.com
Pipeline Icon Pay service with live and archived video. Learn more
Radio News Icon Download audio news  |  RSS Feed Add RSS headlines