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Quick Guide & Transcript: Bush attends APEC summit, Some Dems push for immigration reform

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(CNN Student News) -- November 20, 2006

Quick Guide

President Bush in Asia - Get an overview of the president's itinerary at the APEC summit in communist-run Vietnam.

The Immigration Issue - Learn why some new House Democrats want to work with the Republican president on immigration reform.

Wii vs. PS3 - Find out how a new gaming console could make video games a highly (inter)active experience.

Transcript

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

CHRISTINA PARK, CNN STUDENT NEWS ANCHOR: It's Monday and time for another week of CNN Student News! Glad you could join us, I'm Christina Park. President Bush gets way more than a cool new robe during an Asian summit. How a country that wasn't invited dominated the agenda. The immigration issue goes from the campaign trail to capitol hill. Why some Democrats might be allies of the president in the push for reform. Gamers got to have it! Nintendo unveils its newest gaming console. Find out why "wee" is way different and see how it stacks up against the new Playstation.

First Up: President Bush in Asia

PARK: First Up today we go to Vietnam where President Bush is visiting Ho Chi Minh City. He attended a Pacific rim economic summit in the country. There's irony in seeing a U.S. president tour the bustling capital city. 31 years ago U.S forces evacuated the former Saigon - a move that ended America's involvement in the Vietnam War. During his week-long trip to Asia, the president wants to shore up support among Asian allies. Elaine Quijano has more.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

ELAINE QUIJANO, CNN REPORTER: After two days of meetings, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit wrapped up without a mention of North Korea in its final written statement. But APEC's chairman verbally urged North Korea to return to the negotiating table and said the group's 21 member nations were in agreement on enforcing sanctions.

NGUYEN MINH MINH TRIET, VIETNAMESE PRESIDENT: Leaders agreed to ask parties concerned to strictly implement the resolution 1718 of the U.N. Security Council.

QUIJANO: Earlier, President Bush sat down for a bilateral meeting with Chinese President Hu Jintao.

PRESIDENT GEORGE W. BUSH: China is a very important nation, and the United States believes strongly that by working together, we can help solve problems, such as North Korea and Iran.

QUIJANO: China wields the greatest influence with its neighbor, North Korea and is a critical partner in the six-nation talks aimed at getting North Korea to abandon its nuclear weapons program. Mr. Bush also met with Russian President Vladimir Putin to discuss North Korea as well as Iran. And as expected, the two announced the U.S. is backing Russia's bid to join the World Trade Organization.

QUIJANO: President Bush began his Sunday morning as he usually does, by going to church.

BUSH :Laura and I just had a moment to converse with God in a church here in Hanoi.

QUIJANO: But by attending the ecumenical service in communist-run Vietnam, the president was making a political statement.

BUSH: A whole society is a society which welcomes basic freedoms, and there's no more basic freedom than the basic, the freedom to worship as you see fit.

QUIJANO: The president ended his day in Ho Chi Minh City by having dinner with Australian Prime Minister John Howard, a staunch U.S. ally. On Monday, the president plans to highlight Vietnam's economic progress by visiting the stock exchange and meeting with business leaders before heading off to Indonesia. Elaine Quijano, CNN, with the president in Ho Chi Minh City.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

Order Up!

CARL AZUZ, CNN STUDENT NEWS: Ready to Order Up? Today's selections are Vietnam, Indonesia, Singapore. See if you can rank these countries in order from the first on President Bush's Asia trip to the most recent. Order Up! The answer is C - A - B: The president's first stop was in Singapore, then he headed to the APEC summit in Vietnam, and then it was on to Indonesia. And that completes today's order!

The Immigration Issue

PARK: One of the first issues a new congress might face is illegal immigration. President Bush is backing a program to let illegal's already in the U.S work toward citizenship. Some Republicans call that a free pass for lawbreakers. But as Kareen Wynter explains, the president might get some help for immigration reform from an unlikely side of the aisle.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

KAREEN WYNTER, CNN REPORTER: They were the shockwaves felt from the congressional midterm elections.

REP. NANCY PELOSI, (D) CALIFORNIA: Today we have made history.

WYNTER: Republicans lost control of both houses. But President Bush may have gained one advantage in the Democratic takeover, an unlikely base of allies on a top national security issue: illegal immigration.

BUSH: I believe we can find some common ground with the Democrats.

WYNTER: Newly elected House Democrats, like Harry Mitchell and Gabrielle Giffords of Arizona are just a few eager to work with President Bush on his comprehensive immigration reforms. A heavily debated plan which House Republicans have blocked for two years.

HARRY MITCHELL, (D) ARIZONA, CONGRESSMAN-ELECT: I suspect that will be one of the first things going through. It's my freshman year, so I don't know, but I think that since it's a number one issue it seems all over this country or an important issue anyway it will be dealt with very quickly.

GABRIELLE GIFFORDS, (D) ARIZONA, CONGRESSWOMAN-ELECT: If an idea is a good idea, it's a good idea. It doesn't matter if it's a Republican idea or a Democratic idea.

WYNTER: The president has had more support from Democrats and moderate Republicans on the guest worker plan than with hardline Republican conservatives who favor firmer immigration enforcement.

MITCHELL: It's an economic problem and I think that has to be dealt with and I think that's exactly what from what I understand, the McCain-Kennedy bill and the presidents bill wanted to do.

WYNTER: Congressman-elect Harry Mitchell says nowhere is the problem more pervasive than in Arizona, a frontline state in immigration. Here in Tucson, border patrol agents bust nearly 2,000 illegal crossers each day from Mexico. A job that would be eased by the placement of more agents along the border if Bush's policy passes. Analysts say that could happen with the Democratic majority in Congress that stands ready to trump the approach of the president's own party. Kareen Wynter, CNN, Los Angeles.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

Word to the Wise

AZUZ: A Word to the Wise... pervasive (adjective) spread throughout so thoroughly as to be seen everywhere

Source: www.wordcentral.comexternal link

Wii vs. PS3

PARK: Okay, this election season we've had red state versus blue state, Republican versus Democrat. But the debate that might matter even more to some of you is this: Playstation versus Wii. Both Sony and Nintendo are debuting new gaming consoles. That's got all gamers geeked out with excitement. Here's Daniel Sieberg to explain exactly why thumbs are atwitter this holiday season.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DANIEL SIEBERG, CNN REPORTER: Gamers are in for a treat this holiday season as two new gaming consoles hit the market. We're talking about Sony's PlayStation 3 and Nintendo's Wii. They join Microsoft's Xbox 360, which is already out there, and joining us now is Brian Cooley from CNET. Let's start with Nintendo's Wii -- rather unique spelling of Wii, by the way: W-I-I. A unique design, especially when we're talking about the controller or the Wii remote.

BRIAN COOLEY, CNET.COM: The Wii remote's a wireless remote, but it also has motion-sensing, Daniel, so as you move it around in space, it translates those motions to the game, makes sports games very interactive as opposed to moving little jogwheels and things.

SIEBERG: And there is a sports package that is bundled with it, we should say. And you can also carry around your character in your remote?

COOLEY: Your avatar, when you create your onscreen character and customize it, you can load it into the remote, go to a friend's house who has a Wii, and then transfer your avatar in to keep your personality as you go from home to home.

SIEBERG: And if you've got game that you can use two hands, you can actually have a controller that's got a joystick...

COOLEY: Two motion-sensing for boxing games or anything else that has two hands involved.

SIEBERG: And now what about some of the older titles we remember, say Super Mario or a Zelda game -- can you play these on the Wii?

COOLEY: Nintendo is all about their legacy catalog; they're strictly a game message, and they've gone very deep, so they've got support for every game you ever thought of on Nintendo plus Sega, NEC turbo graphics, I mean way back, so giant back catalog.

SIEBERG: And cheaper price than the other two that are going to be out there.

COOLEY: Yeah, $250.

SIEBERG: Okay, so now we're going to talk about the PlayStation 3. You're going to pay more for the processing power, right?

COOLEY: This is the big dog. This is a device that gives you high-definition games, so the games come out in HD in that beautiful HDTV you hopefully have. It has a Blu-ray disc player, so you're entering the era of Blu-ray high-definition movies, and it has a hard drive so it can become a media server in your home to store other types of audio-video and images to show on your TV. So it's more than just a gaming message; it's really a powerful box.

SIEBERG: Wireless controller for this as well?

COOLEY: Same thing. They've got what they've call a six-axis controller -- looks like the traditional PlayStation controller, but now it has wireless and motion.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

Promo

PARK: Here's the "down-low" on the easily download-able"! Watch CNN Student News through our new podcast. With a podcast, you can expand each show to full screen...So you'll be sure the students in the back row can see too! You can get the podcast at CNN.com/EDUCATION. Or while you're on iTunes, search for CNN Student News. Subscribe, and we'll be there for you, every time you sign in.

Before We Go

PARK: Before we go, if you felt some tremors this weekend, maybe this is why. It's elephant polo in India! This Saturday match featured 20 rumbling pachyderms. Members of the British royal family and Indian movie-stars attended. Animal-rights activists protested the really big show. They say these jumbos are exploited and subjected to beatings - charges the event organizer denies. He calls the big event a "gentle sport."

Goodbye

PARK: That's your Monday edition of CNN Student News. Join us tomorrow for more. Until then, I'm Christina Park.


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