Skip to main content
Search
Services
EDUCATION with Student News

CNN Presents Classroom: Body Parts

(CNN Student News) -- Set your VCR to record the CNN Presents Classroom Edition: Body Parts when it airs commercial-free on Monday, July 17, 2006, from 4:00 -- 5:00 a.m. ET on CNN. (A short feature begins at 4:00 a.m. and precedes the program.)

Program Overview

Living organ donors elect to give away their kidneys and livers to family, friends and even anonymous strangers. Although organ recipients generally receive lifelong care following their operations, the long-term effects for organ donors have been far less studied. CNN Medical Correspondent Elizabeth Cohen examines the experiences of several living donors and their families as they make their gift-of-life decisions -- with sometimes very unfortunate consequences.

Grade Level: 6 -- 12

Subject Areas: Science, Health

Objectives: The CNN Presents Classroom Edition: Body Parts and its corresponding discussion questions and activity challenge students to:

  • Differentiate between living and non-living organ donation;
  • Describe the range of organ transplantation;
  • Learn about the history of organ transplantation;
  • Identify and explain the benefits and drawbacks of organ transplantation for recipients and for donors.
  • Curriculum Connections

    Science

    Standard 5. Understands the structure and function of cells and organisms

    Level III [Grade: 6-8]

    Benchmark 4. Knows that multicellular organisms have a variety of specialized cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems that perform specialized functions (e.g., digestion, respiration, reproduction, circulation, excretion, movement, control and coordination, protection from disease)

    Benchmark 8. Knows that disease in organisms can be caused by intrinsic failures of the system or infection by other organisms

    McREL Benchmarks

    Content Knowledge: A Compendium of Standards and Benchmarks for K-12 Education (Copyright 2000 McREL) is published online by Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL) (http://www.mcrel.org/standards-benchmarksexternal link), 2550 S. Parker Road, Suite 500, Aurora, CO 80014; Telephone: 303/337-0990

    Science

    (Grades 9-12)

    CONTENT STANDARD C: Life Science

    As a result of activities in grades 9-12 all students should develop an understanding of:

  • Interdependence of organisms
  • Behavior of organisms
  • CONTENT STANDARD E: Science and Technology

    As a result of activities in grades 9-12 all students should develop:

  • Understandings about science and technology
  • CONTENT STANDARD F: Science in Personal and Social Perspectives

    As a result of activities in grades 9-12 all students should develop an understanding of:

  • Personal and community health
  • Natural resources
  • Science and technology in local, national, and global challenges
  • CONTENT STANDARD G: History and Nature of Science

    As a result of activities in grades 5-8 all students should develop an understanding of:

  • Science as a human endeavor
  • Nature of scientific knowledge
  • Historical perspectives
  • The National Science Education Standards (http://books.nap.edu/html/nses/pdf/index.htmlexternal link) are published by the National Academies Press (http://www4.nationalacademies.org/nas/nashome.nsfexternal link).

    Health

    Standard 8. Knows essential concepts about the prevention and control of disease

    Level III [Grade: 6-8]

    Benchmark 1. Understands how lifestyle, pathogens, family history, and other risk factors are related to the cause or prevention of disease and other health problems

    Benchmark 3. Understands personal rights and responsibilities involved in the treatment of disease (e.g., proper use of medication; the influence of family and culture on the treatment of disease)

    Level IV [Grade: 9-12]

    Benchmark 1. Understands how the immune system functions to prevent or combat disease

    Benchmark 4. Understands the social, economic, and political effects of disease on individuals, families, and communities

    McREL Benchmarks

    Content Knowledge: A Compendium of Standards and Benchmarks for K-12 Education (Copyright 2000 McREL) is published online by Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning (McREL) (http://www.mcrel.org/standards-benchmarksexternal link), 2550 S. Parker Road, Suite 500, Aurora, CO 80014; Telephone: 303/337-0990

    Discussion Questions

    1. Who is Kathleen Sampson, and why did she decide to donate her kidney to someone she didn't know? What risks did she assume by having the surgery? What is your opinion of Ms. Sampson's decision to donate?

    2. Who is Barry Mendez, and to what religious group does he belong? Why did Mr. Mendez decide to donate his kidney to someone he didn't know? Do you think that he should have been allowed to donate his kidney? Why or why not?

    3. Why did Stephanie Slaught decide to donate her kidney to her sister Sarah? How did this decision impact Stephanie and her family? Would you be willing to donate your kidney to someone you loved if he or she needed it? Explain.

    4. According to the program, who can qualify to be a live organ donor? Do you think that alcoholics and drug addicts should be allowed to donate their organs? Why or why not? In your view, should a person with a history of mental illness be allowed to donate? State your rationale.

    5. Do you think that there should be stricter rules for screening organ donors? If so, what screening criteria do you think should be used?

    6. According the program, what role does the federal government have in regulating live organ donations? Do you think that the government should have a more active role? If so, how? If not, why not?

    7. Why is it important to monitor living donors and organ recipients after surgery? According to the program, for how long after surgery are living donors and organ recipients monitored? For how long do you think that these two groups should be monitored after surgery? State your rationale.

    8. According to the program, what are the pros and cons of establishing a long-term registry to track organ donors after surgery? If such a registry were to be established, who do you think should create and maintain it?

    9. Would you ever consider being an organ donor? Why or why not? Would you be willing to accept an organ from a living donor or a deceased person in order to live? Explain. Do you think that people should be allowed to sell their organs? State your rationale. To what extent, if any, has this program influenced you views on organ donation?

    Suggested Activities

    1. To help your class learn more about (after-death) organ donation, send small groups of students on online scavenger hunts to answer the following questions:

    1. Who can become a donor?
    2. Are there age limits for donors?
    3. How do you become an organ donor?
    4. What organs and tissues can people donate?
    5. How many people are waiting for transplants?
    6. How are organs distributed?
    7. What is the National Organ Transplant Act?
    8. To what extent is ethnicity a factor in organ donation?
    9. Why are some people opposed to organ donation?

    After groups share their findings, divide students into two teams to debate the pros and cons of becoming an organ donor. Conclude the activity by having each student write a paper completing the following sentence: "I would/would not consider becoming an organ donor because..."

    2. Divide students into pairs. Instruct each pair to select and research one of the following types of organ or tissue transplantation:

    Organs

  • Heart
  • Intestine
  • Kidney
  • Liver
  • Lung
  • Pancreas
  • Tissues
  • Blood
  • Bone/Tendon
  • Cornea
  • Heart Valve
  • Bone Marrow/Stem Cell
  • Skin
  • Vein/Artery
  • Pose the following questions to guide students' research:

  • What is the function of the organ or tissue, and what illnesses are associated with it?
  • For how long has this type of organ or tissue transplant been available?
  • For whom does the transplant typically occur, and is ethnicity a factor?
  • Does it matter whether the donor is living or deceased?
  • What can hinder a successful transplant?
  • What are the side effects of transplantation and life expectancy after transplantation?
  • After student pairs complete their research, have them create PowerPoint presentations of their findings and deliver their presentations to the class. Compile hard copies of the students' PowerPoints and give them to the media specialist at your school.

    EXTENSION: Point out to students that the first organ transplant in history took place on December 23, 1954, when a man gave his twin brother one of his kidneys. The recipient lived eight more years, and the surgeon who performed the operation won a Nobel Prize. Have students draw upon their research to create a timeline that charts the progression of organ transplantation in the United States.

    Keywords

    Organ donor, transplant, ethics, kidney, liver, dialysis, biopsy, tracking, registry, federal guidelines, regulations

    Story Tools
    Subscribe to Time for $1.99 cover
    Top Stories
    Get up-to-the minute news from CNN
    CNN.com gives you the latest stories and video from the around the world, with in-depth coverage of U.S. news, politics, entertainment, health, crime, tech and more.
    Top Stories
    Get up-to-the minute news from CNN
    CNN.com gives you the latest stories and video from the around the world, with in-depth coverage of U.S. news, politics, entertainment, health, crime, tech and more.
    Search JobsMORE OPTIONS


     
    Search
    © 2007 Cable News Network.
    A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved.
    Terms under which this service is provided to you.
    Read our privacy guidelines. Contact us. Site Map.
    Offsite Icon External sites open in new window; not endorsed by CNN.com
    Pipeline Icon Pay service with live and archived video. Learn more
    Radio News Icon Download audio news  |  RSS Feed Add RSS headlines