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EDUCATION with Student News

Quick Guide & Transcript: Hurricane season begins, Utah students chart their world

SPECIAL REPORT

(CNN Student News) -- June 2, 2006

Quick Guide

Hurricane Season - Find out how FEMA has prepared for the 2006 Atlantic hurricane season.

Video Yearbook: Iraq - Pore over recent events in Iraq as our Video Yearbook's last chapter unfolds.

Acing the Final - Learn how some geography students in Utah were required to chart the world.

Transcript

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

DANIELLE ELIAS, CNN STUDENT NEWS ANCHOR: It's the school year's last TV broadcast of CNN Student News! Hello everyone, I'm Danielle Elias. No one can stop this from happening again. But if it does, the government says it'll be better prepared to help this time around. We covered a lot of ground this year in the Persian Gulf. Join us for a look back at the highlights, in our video yearbook. And if you think all taxi-cabs are the same, meet a guy who drives to a different drummer!

First Up: Hurricane Season

ELIAS: The Atlantic hurricane season is now officially underway. And while there's nothing to report yet, as far as storms go, forecasters are telling anyone who lives near the east or gulf coasts: be ready to batten down the hatches. One of the biggest fears is another Hurricane Katrina. But the Federal Emergency Management Agency says it's gonna be better prepared if something like that blows in. Here's Tara Mergener to tell us how.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

MAX MAYFIELD, NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER DIRECTOR: When everybody is saying it's going to be above average, people need to sit up and take notice . The message is very consistent -- prepare, prepare, prepare.

TARA MERGENER, CNN REPORTER: And federal officials are heeding the advice from the National Hurricane Center and other experts. William Gray of Colorado State University is predicting 17 named storms -- nine hurricanes -- five of them major. He says there's a 69-percent chance one of them will hit the East Coast. The news is especially alarming to the Gulf Coast -- still picking up the pieces from last year's devastating blow. Hurricane Katrina cost the U.S. economy more than 100 billion dollars and killed more than 18 hundred people, 1500 in Louisiana alone. The Federal Emergency Management Agency says it is working with local agencies so they won't be caught off guard again.

DAVID PAULISON, FEMA DIRECTOR: We met with the emergency managers and we sat down with them, put technical teams down there to help them put good, solid evacuations plans in place. We have gone through those. We have rehearsed those. We are comfortable those will work.

MERGENER: The Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff says the government is doing everything it can to prepare for the worst.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

Video Yearbook Response

SADDAM HUSSEIN: I am the president of Iraq. I was elected by the will of the people and until this minute I respect the will of the people and I will defend it with honor against the traitors and against America and its agents.

ELIAS: A lot of you knew that yesterday's speaker was former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, who's on trial for alleged crimes against humanity. Here's who wrote in the right answer.

Video Yearbook: Iraq

ELIAS: Now for the last section of our video yearbook. Deanna Morawski reviews this year's coverage from Iraq.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

DEANNA MORAWSKI, CNN STUDENT NEWS REPORTER: Iraq has seen ongoing violence -- much of it taking place between Shiites and Sunnis, including bomb attacks on several shrines and mosques. But Iraq did make progress on some fronts. The first trial of former Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein began in October. He and seven co-defendants are charged in the 1982 massacre of 148 people in Dujail. Proceedings have been slow going, with frequent outbursts by the defendants and the assassinations of two attorneys. Also in October, Iraqi voters approved a new constitution. It was a key step in establishing an Iraqi democracy, and paved the way for a new Iraqi parliament to be elected in December. And last week, Iraq's first permanent government since Hussein's fall from power was sworn in, despite the failure to fill three cabinet positions. The new government represents a cultural cross-section of the Iraqi population and a step forward for a troubled nation. For CNN Student News, I'm Deanna Morawski.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

Historic Headlines

ELIAS: A couple other headlines from the past ten months now conclude our CNN Student News, Video Yearbook.

Geography Final

ELIAS: We told you a few weeks ago that geography isn't a strong subject for many young Americans: A recent study of 18-to-24 year-olds finds only one-third of them can find Iraq on a map. Well, one geography class in Utah needs to know a lot more than where Iraq is. Keith McCord of affiliate KSL maps out a very detailed assignment!

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

KEITH MCCORD, KSL REPORTER: It's one thing to point to a map and name a certain country, but in Courtney Roberts' geography class, the students don't get that luxury.

COURTNEY ROBERTS, GEOGRAPHY TEACHER: I am going to hand out the paper, and then you can get started as soon as you get the paper.

MCCORD: For their final test today, they got a blank sheet of paper, and they had to draw, from memory, the world. With all 200 countries and eight bodies of water identified, freehand - and neatness counts.

ROBERTS: Their countries have to be pretty much the right size and shape or its not going to fit together like a puzzle. So if you going to have a good map, they do have to be pretty accurate.

MCCORD: Preparation for the final test actually began at the beginning of the school year. On the first day of class, the students are asked to draw a map of the world. You can see they are pretty basic. On the last day of class, they've all gotten a lot better. Take this student for example. Here was her view of the world last September. And here is how she drew it up today. Though some of these world maps were less precise than others, they were pretty impressive. After all, the students only had 45 minutes to sketch these.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CNN Presents Classroom Edition

ELIAS: It's recognized as one of the key turning points of the 20th century: D-day, 1944, when allied forces stormed the beaches of France. It was the beginning of the end for Nazi Germany. And the next CNN Presents, Classroom Edition brings you the stories of the men who fought their way into Europe. Showtimes and classroom materials, at our web site!

Off the Beaten Path

ELIAS: If you're in chorus, or if you just like singing in the car, we've got your dream taxicab ready to rock! Carl Azuz warms up his vocal chords from off the beaten path!

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

CARL AZUZ, CNN REPORTER: Don't think this is just another taxi. When you climb into this classy cab, you're getting more than transit service: You're getting karaoke. Singapore's singin' transportation sensation is a wonder on wheels, belting out hits like "Sabai Sabai" as you go bye-bye, bye-bye. It's a service sure to spread smiles for miles...truly letting you rock while you roll!

Now we're gonna take you to an English event where not everyone walks away a winner. In fact, not everyone walks away. What has dozens of legs, but can't stay up on them? The people who participated in Britain's annual cheese chase! Maybe Charles Darwin wouldn't call these folks, the fittest. But they did survive, and they've got the concussions to prove it!

RICHARD JEFFERIES, CHEESE ROLL ORGANIZER: Because the ground is soft, we probably had less injuries than when the ground was hard.

AZUZ: Well, that sounds logical...but even watching wasn't safe this year: One spectator was hurt when a wheel of cheese careened into the crowd! Yeah, try explaining THAT to the doctor! Taking a tumble, Off the Beaten Path, I'm Carl Azuz.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

Goodbye

ELIAS: The staff of CNN Student News wishes all of you a fun and fantastic summer. Starting next Wednesday, please remember to check our web site for weekly news updates! We'll see you soon, at CNN.com/EDUCATION.

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