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British police look into rafting trip

Center director: Two July 7 bombing suspects there in June

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LONDON, England (CNN) -- A whitewater rafting center in northern Wales has become a focus of one line of inquiry into the bombings and attempted bombings in London on July 7 and July 21, British police said Sunday.

British newspapers carried pictures of two of the July 7 bombers -- Mohammad Sidique Khan and Shehzad Tanweer -- on a trip to the center last month.

British media outlets also suggested the center might provide a link between the two attacks.

Evidence picked up in the rucksacks used in the four failed bombings last week indicated at least one of the attackers may have been at the rafting center on the same day as Tanweer and Khan, some reports said.

Paul O'Sullivan, director of the National Whitewater Center, confirmed Khan and Tanweer did take part in a rafting trip on June 4. He would not say whether any of the failed bombers of July 21 were there as well.

"We were able to confirm that there was another group of similar ethnic origin rafting on that day. Whether there was any connection, we've got no clue," O'Sullivan said.

"We had one group rafting in the morning and one group rafting in the afternoon. And they were two separate bookings, and really they were just normal groups," he said.

"There was nothing out of the ordinary in their actions or in the booking that would seem at all different from any other group coming to the center."

The center gets about 15,000 customers a year, he said.

All participants register and sign forms before taking part in a trip, which generally lasts two hours, O'Sullivan said. He would not show reporters the forms signed by participants June 4.

Officials with the center said they were cooperating with police.

The July 7 attacks killed 52 people and the four bombers. More than 700 people were wounded.

London police identified Germaine Lindsay and Hasib Hussain as the other bombers.

Khan, 30, Tanweer, 22, and Hussain, 18 -- all British citizens of Pakistani heritage -- lived in the Leeds area in northern England. Lindsay, 19, a Jamaican-born British citizen, lived in Aylesbury, about 40 miles west of London.

The attacks targeted three London Underground trains and a double-decker bus during morning rush hour.

On Thursday, in what appeared to be an attempt on similar targets, four bombs only partially detonated, police said. One person was wounded.

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