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LONDON, England (CNN) -- London police are urging people who were near the scenes of Thursday's deadly bomb blasts in the British capital to send in any information they may have captured on their mobiles phones.

"We are making an urgent appeal for any photos or videos -- including from mobile phones -- taken Thursday morning close to where the bombs exploded," said Brian Paddick from the Metropolitan Police.

The city's police force said on its Web site Sunday that police believe such images could contain vital information and provide a crucial piece of the "investigative jigsaw" in a "painstaking and complex inquiry."

Police are urging people to send their material to images@met.police.uk.

At least 49 people were killed and 700 injured in four near simultaneous blasts on Thursday, three in the city's underground train system and one on a bus. Police say 31 people have been reported as missing.

They say there has been an extraordinary public response for help in tracing the people behind Thursday's bombings.

So far police say they have received around 1,700 calls to their special hotline, characterizing the tips as "very useful."

More and more mobile phones now have video capability, meaning that bystanders can immediately capture what is happening around them.

When the December 26 tsunami hit nations bordering the Indian Ocean, amateur videos helped show the impact of the waves and were widely shown by news outlets.

Immediately following the London bombings, many news networks appealed to viewers to send in any video they had taken, and amateur photos were widely broadcast.

Investigators have also asked Internet and mobile phone companies to store the content of voicemails, e-mails and SMS text messages that were in their systems on the day of the London bombings, a police source told Reuters news agency.

Thousands of surveillance cameras monitor London's underground and the city's streets. But there have been no major breakthroughs in the investigation yet.

Authorities say they still do not know definitively how the bombings -- just seconds apart -- were carried out, but police are leaning to the theory that timers were used, rather than suicide bombers.

Heightened security across the country's transport network led to the arrest of three men arriving at London's Heathrow airport, but they were later released.

At the time of their arrest, Paddick said it was "pure speculation at this stage to be drawn (into) direct linkages with the attacks in London."

Days after the bombing there is concern the bombers or their associates may still be at large, and without a strong lead, detectives are working on a number of lines of inquiry.

"If they didn't perish in the bombs they are still out there somewhere or have left the country," Andy Trotter from the British Transport Police said.

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