Skip to main content
Search
Services
WORLD

Queen: 'Way of life won't change'

Elizabeth, Charles visit bomb victims in hospitals

SPECIAL REPORT

RELATED

LONDON, England -- Britain's Queen Elizabeth II has said that the terrorists responsible for the bomb attacks on London "will not change our way of life."

The queen was visiting some of the victims of the attack at the Royal London Hospital in East London on Friday.

She said she admired the way Londoners were "calmly determined" to get on with their lives and expressed "sympathy to all of those caught up in these events."

"Atrocities such as these simply reinforce our sense of community, our humanity, our trust in the rule of law. That is the clear message from us all," the queen said in a speech to staff at the hospital.

The queen flew by helicopter to the hospital from Windsor Castle. She toured the hospital, starting in the Accident and Emergency Department, thanking staff for their work in the rescue operation, Britain's Press Association reported.

She later visited a ward where survivors were being treated and chatted with patient Bruce Lait, 32, who was on the train carriage that was blown apart near the Liverpool Street Underground station Thursday.

A Buckingham Palace spokeswomen said it was "highly unusual for the queen to speak so soon after an event like this. It underlines the gravity of what has happened."

The queen's eldest son and heir to the throne, Prince Charles, also paid tribute to the "resilience of the British people" after the attacks.

The Prince of Wales and his wife, Camilla, Duchess of Cornwall, had earlier in the day visited St. Mary's Hospital in Paddington, central London, which is near to the Edgware Road blast scene.

The prince praised hospital staff for their quick response and hard work, PA reported.

"It's been one of the things that many of us have dreaded for a long time and now they have finally got through," the prince said.

"What I can never get over is the resilience of the British people who have set us all a fantastic example of how to recover."

He added: "I remember coming here after the Paddington rail crash (in October 1999). (Staff) really are extraordinary. Everyone pulls together and it brings out the best of them."

The prince and duchess also toured the Metropolitan Police's casualty bureau in north London to see how officers had dealt with thousands of calls from concerned members of the public.

The duchess said she felt "proud to be British" as she watched Londoners' reaction to the bombings.

The couple also met teams who worked to match reports of missing persons with known details about the dead and injured.

Story Tools
Subscribe to Time for $1.99 cover
Top Stories
Get up-to-the minute news from CNN
CNN.com gives you the latest stories and video from the around the world, with in-depth coverage of U.S. news, politics, entertainment, health, crime, tech and more.
Top Stories
Get up-to-the minute news from CNN
CNN.com gives you the latest stories and video from the around the world, with in-depth coverage of U.S. news, politics, entertainment, health, crime, tech and more.
Search JobsMORE OPTIONS


 
Search
© 2007 Cable News Network.
A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines. Contact us. Site Map.
Offsite Icon External sites open in new window; not endorsed by CNN.com
Pipeline Icon Pay service with live and archived video. Learn more
Radio News Icon Download audio news  |  RSS Feed Add RSS headlines