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Fast facts on business learning

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  • The classuc MBA last two years, but accelerated courses are becoming popular
  • The world's first business school was France's ESCP-EAP, opened in 1819
  • The biggest accreditation body for business schools is the U.S.-based AASCB
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LONDON, England (CNN) -- Want to know a little more about your education options? CNN has compiled some fast facts about executive education programs:

Fast facts on business learning

  • The classic MBA is a two-year full-time program. Accelerated and distance learning MBAs are increasingly popular.
  • A typical MBA student has several years' work experience and is in their late 20s. Those who take an Executive MBA, or EMBA, tend to be older, more senior managers.
  • Courses are expensive, but the rewards are high -- some new MBAs now get a $100,000 basic salary, according to a survey.
  • The biggest accreditation body for business schools is the U.S.-based AASCB. Another notable one is the Association of MBAs in the UK.
  • The world's first business school was France's ESCP-EAP, which opened in 1819.
  • The first U.S. school opened in 1881. It was the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School.
  • The United States now dominates business education -- according to the Financial Times MBA rankings for 2007, eight of the top 10 were based at U.S. schools.
  • However, there are a number of increasingly good schools in Asia, the Middle East and Africa.
  • China and India are among the fastest-growing markets in the world for business education.
  • The cost of an MBA varies enormously. However, many students end up spending $100,000 on a two year course, counting living expenses.
  • According to educational experts, demand to take MBA courses can often be strongest when the economy is weak.
  • The converse is often true -- demand to enter business schools dropped markedly during the dot-com boom.
  • As well as general MBAs, specialist courses exist in everything from social entrepreneurship to luxury goods and the wine trade.
  • Increasing numbers of MBAs offer an international perspective, and many demand students spend some time studying abroad.
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