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CIA reviews Clarke's 2002 testimony

Some in GOP call his allegations to 9/11 panel contradictory


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WASHINGTON (CNN) -- The CIA is deciding how much the public will be able to read about what former White House counterterrorism adviser Richard Clarke said officially in 2002 about the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, U.S. officials confirmed Monday.

The agency is reviwing Clarke's closed-door testimony about the attacks to determine which parts must remain classified as the Bush administration prepares to make the rest public.

At the time of his testimony before a joint panel of the House and Senate Intelligence committees in July 2002, Clarke was still a senior White House official.

Clarke's criticism of the Bush administration's antiterrorism policy in his new book, "Against All Enemies," has triggered a ferocious response from the White House.

The review is in response to a request by top Republicans in Congress to declassify Clarke's testimony in order to compare his comments in 2002 with those he made Wednesday before the independent National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States. (Full story)

Friday, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, a Tennessee Republican, charged that in his 2002 testimony, Clarke was "effusive in his praise" of the administration's counterintelligence efforts before the attacks, while, in his testimony last week before the 9/11 commission, Clarke was highly critical of those same efforts.

Frist said the testimony needed to be released because Clarke "has told two entirely different stories under oath." House Speaker Dennis Hastert, an Illinois Republican, joined in the call for declassification.

Appearing Sunday on NBC's "Meet The Press," Clarke said he welcomed declassification of his testimony "but not just a little line here and there -- let's declassify all six hours." He also called for release of documents and e-mails that he said would prove false the claims that his testimony was contradictory. (Full story)

Clarke has said he "emphasized the positive" while serving in the administration, but, now that he is on the outside, is free to reveal what he sees as the Bush administration's shortcomings in dealing with terrorism before September 11.

CNN's David Ensor contributed to this report.


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