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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


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Subscribe to Time for $1.99 cover
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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


Story Tools
Subscribe to Time for $1.99 cover
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Iran poll to go to run-off
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MONROVIA, Liberia (CNN) -- The U.N. Mission in Liberia officially began Wednesday as most of the U.S. forces have left the war-torn West African country in relative peace.

Nearly 3,500 West African troops will serve as peacekeepers under UNMIL, awaiting 12,000 reinforcement troops to be dispersed throughout Liberia.

On Sept. 19, the U.N. Security Council unanimously approved the year-long mission, which is mandated to monitor a cease-fire agreement between rebel groups and government forces.

UNMIL will also assist the transitional government in setting up a legal framework to allow for free and fair elections by October 2005.

The United States sent in about 200 forces to help quell the violence between rebel and government forces in Liberia that rekindled earlier this year.

About 50 U.S. Special Forces remain in Monrovia as a precaution.

Liberia's former president, Charles Taylor, left the country Aug. 11, as demanded by U.S. President George Bush, clearing the way for U.S. troops to begin their humanitarian mission in earnest.

The United Nations approved the deployment of up to 15,000 military personnel and over 1,000 civilian police officers to Liberia.

-- CNN Correspondent Jeff Koinange in Monrovia contributed to this report


Story Tools
Subscribe to Time for $1.99 cover
Top Stories
Iran poll to go to run-off
Top Stories
CNN/Money: Security alert issued for 40 million credit cards
 
 
 
 

International Edition
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SEARCH
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© 2005 Cable News Network LP, LLLP.
A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines. Contact us.
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CNN.com does not endorse external sites.
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