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Sources: Pentagon rushed postwar plan

From Barbara Starr
CNN Washington Bureau

A draft report from the Pentagon suggests that military planners did not have time to adequately prepare for the reconstruction of Iraq.
A draft report from the Pentagon suggests that military planners did not have time to adequately prepare for the reconstruction of Iraq.

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Joint Chiefs of Staff

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- A classified draft military review on lessons learned from the war in Iraq says planners did not have enough time to prepare for the so-called Phase IV operation -- the rebuilding and reconstruction of Iraq, according to Pentagon sources.

The review of the lessons is one of several being conducted throughout the military.

This particular assessment is an ongoing project of the senior members of the Joint Staff, which serves the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

The project looks at lessons learned in a number of areas: personnel, deployments, intelligence, operations, logistics and planning.

The section on planning suggests that insufficient preparation for Phase IV before the war limited the military's focus on that issue. The review recommends a better structure for planning postwar rebuilding operations.

The review also notes problems in trying to locate weapons of mass destruction, saying insufficient resources were devoted to the problem in the early days after the war.

Pentagon sources emphasized the review will continue, and recommendations may be expanded or dropped in subsequent revisions.

"This is an effort to see how we can do things better," one official said, noting that lessons learned reports are standard military procedure after a conflict.

In a step intended to bring Iraq closer to self-rule, ministers of the Iraqi Governing Council were sworn into office Wednesday. The council chose a slate of 25 cabinet ministers Monday. (Full story)

Paul Bremer, the U.S. administrator for Iraq, reviewed the list, sources said.

"They will run the ministries, the day-to-day business of government is in their hands," Bremer said Tuesday.

"They will be involved in the final stages of the 2004 budget preps, and they will have responsibility for operating their ministries according to those budgets."

Meanwhile, a draft U.N. Security Council resolution being floated by the United States would give the United Nations a greater role in the political and economic reconstruction of Iraq.

And it would establish what U.S. Secretary of State Powell termed a "political horizon" for the restoration of self-rule in Iraq.

White House press secretary Scott McClellan said the new resolution would build on U.N. Resolution 1483.

The resolution recognized the United States and Britain as the occupying powers in Iraq and urged member states "to assist the people of Iraq in their efforts to reform their institutions and rebuild their country."

It "would allow for the maximum possible international participation in helping the Iraqi people build a better future," McClellan said. (Full story)

A  new report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said that under present policies the U.S. military can maintain current troop strength -- 180,000 in and around Iraq -- only until March 2004.

After that time, the report said, a U.S. occupation force numbering 38,000 to 64,000 personnel could remain in the country indefinitely -- at a cost of up to $12 billion per year. (Full story)


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