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Two Iraqi scientists shot after aiding U.S.

Chief U.S. weapons hunter David Kay has asked for six to nine more months for his team to search in Iraq.
Chief U.S. weapons hunter David Kay has asked for six to nine more months for his team to search in Iraq.

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The CIA's top weapons inspector told members of Congress his team so far has not found weapons of mass destruction. CNN's David Ensor reports. (October 3)
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WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Two Iraqi scientists were shot, one fatally, after helping the United States search for weapons of mass destruction, according to chief U.S. weapons inspector David Kay.

Kay, who is leading the weapons hunt, added that there has been more help from Iraqis in the past month since better protection has been provided to those cooperating with the effort.

Kay told a group of reporters Friday that one scientist was assassinated with a bullet in the back of the head, and another sustained six bullet wounds, but is alive.

Iraqis helping the Americans have real "grounds for paranoia," Kay said, and members of the Iraq Survey Group are trying to address that to get the "essential" help of Iraqis to find weapons of mass destruction and programs designed to create them.

"Don't be surprised by surprises in Iraq," Kay told reporters.

Kay delivered an interim report to Congress Thursday and said he expects to make a final report in six to nine months. He stressed he still believes weapons may be found.

On Friday, Polish troops discovered four anti-aircraft missiles that are believed to have been produced in Europe this year, a Polish defense ministry spokesman in Warsaw said.

While they are not weapons of mass destruction, the missiles were banned under a 1990 arms embargo.

Testing facility discovered

Kay's 1,200-person team has found two new facilities near a prison where it believes biological weapons tests were conducted on prisoners.

"We have taken senior Iraqi leaders in detention to them," Kay said. The leaders were those who evidence indicated had been involved in the experiments.

"They were clearly shaken up by being taken there," he said, adding they were afraid that "we would make them face a lineup" of victims.

Referring to samples of botulinum toxin Kay has reported finding in a scientist's home, he said the deadly toxins were stored in the scientist's family refrigerator, near their food, and he returned even more dangerous toxins back to his institute.

Kay said that Iraq had paid North Korea $10 million for No Dong missile technology but that the North Koreans did not give it to them. The Iraqis asked for their money back, and the North Koreans refused, he said.

"It's a lesson in negotiating with the North Koreans," he said.

Bush defends war following report

In the face of mounting criticism after Kay reported finding no weapons of mass destruction so far, President Bush on Friday defended his decision to go to war, saying "the world is better off" with Saddam Hussein out of power.

Bush told reporters that Kay's interim report to Congress confirms that Saddam's regime "was a threat -- a serious danger."

"The report states that Saddam Hussein's regime had a clandestine network of biological laboratories, a live strain of deadly agent botulinum, sophisticated concealment efforts and advanced design work on prohibited longer-range missiles," Bush said.


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