Skip to main content
World
CNN Europe CNN Asia
On CNN TV Transcripts Headline News CNN International About CNN.com Preferences
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SERVICES
 
 
 
SEARCH
Web CNN.com
powered by Yahoo!

Day of violence in Kashmir

Protesters burn an effigy of Jammu and Kashmir's new Chief Minister Mufti Mohammed Sayeed on Saturday, soon after he was sworn into office.
Protesters burn an effigy of Jammu and Kashmir's new Chief Minister Mufti Mohammed Sayeed on Saturday, soon after he was sworn into office.

   Story Tools

SPECIAL REPORT
• Timeline: Kashmir history
• In-depth: Where conflict rules

SRINAGAR, India (CNN) -- Indian security forces Saturday intercepted suspected militants, killing at least 12, trying to cross from Pakistani-controlled Kashmir into the Indian-controlled side of the Line of Control, army sources told CNN.

The sources said the gun battle was still going on near the town of Saujian in the Poonch district, about 130 miles northwest of Jammu.

Earlier Saturday evening, a police housing colony came under fire from four rocket grenades, but no one was injured.

Still earlier, suspected militants gunned down a local Kashmiri politician, Mohammad Sikandar, killing him and two of his security guards in Batmaloo outside Srinagar, according to police sources.

Sikandar ran and lost in last month's elections, representing the ruling Congress Party.

In a separate attack Saturday afternoon, suspected militants shot and killed a Kashmiri police officer in Srinagar's city center, the sources said.

Earlier in the day, suspected militants fired two rocket grenades at the home of Jammu and Kashmir's new Chief Minister Mufti Mohammad Sayeed, hours before he was sworn into office, according to local police.

The attack injured a police officer, but did not hurt Sayeed, who was later sworn into office.

Indian opposition National Congress Party leader Sonia Gandhi, left, with Chief Minister Sayeed on October 26 after reaching an alliance to form a new government.
Indian opposition National Congress Party leader Sonia Gandhi, left, with Chief Minister Sayeed on October 26 after reaching an alliance to form a new government.

Sayeed's party came to power campaigning for a softer stand on suspected militants in Kashmir, saying the party wants to apply a healing touch to the disputed region.

In the 1980s, Sayeed's daughter was kidnapped by suspected militants while he served as India's home minister in charge of internal security. He bargained with the kidnappers to release jailed militants in exchange for his daughter, a move criticized by some who said that the decision led to an upsurge of violence in Kashmir.

Over the years, Sayeed's political stance on the militants fighting for an end to Indian rule in Kashmir has softened.

Kashmir has been in dispute between India and Pakistan since 1947, leading to two wars between the nuclear neighbors.

India says Pakistan supports the militants, a claim that Islamabad denies.

CNN's Suhasini Haidar in Delhi contributed to this report.



Story Tools

Top Stories
Iran poll to go to run-off
Top Stories
CNN/Money: Security alert issued for 40 million credit cards
 
 
 
 
  SEARCH CNN.COM:
© 2004 Cable News Network LP, LLLP.
A Time Warner Company. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines. Contact us.
external link
All external sites will open in a new browser.
CNN.com does not endorse external sites.

spaces/ad_tail0.txt"-->