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Teri Garr reveals she has multiple sclerosis

Garr:
Garr: "I don't think negatively about any of the stuff."

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Actress Teri Garr reveals to CNN's Larry King she has multiple sclerosis.
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Actress Teri Garr talks about her decision to go public about her fight with MS. Watch American Morning with Paula Zahn on Wednesday at 7 a.m. ET

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NEW YORK (CNN) -- Actress Teri Garr, best known for her eccentric brand of comedy in several films, revealed Tuesday she has multiple sclerosis.

"I do go on with my life," Garr told CNN's "Larry King Live." "The good news now is that there's a lot of good medicines out there and options for people."

The actress, who got her start as a dancer in several Elvis Presley films, said she's had symptoms for the past 19 years but it took a long time to get a firm diagnosis.

"I think everybody is scared and frightened when they hear something like that, and that's because there's not a lot of information out there about it," said Garr, 52.

She said she walks with a slight limp and has been fitted with a leg brace, and also takes medication to control her symptoms.

Garr said she has been in denial about the MS but is not depressed. "I don't think negatively about any of the stuff," she said.

Garr has had roles in this year's "Searching for Debra Winger" and last year's "Ghost World." She received an Oscar nomination for her role as Sandy in 1982's "Tootsie" with Dustin Hoffman.

The actress takes injections of interferon three times a week and is a paid ambassador for MS-Lifelines, a program for people with multiple sclerosis that is partly funded by a pharmaceutical company.

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease of the central nervous system that causes symptoms ranging from numbness and poor coordination to blindness and paralysis. It affects about 2.5 million people worldwide, most of them women.



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