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Just who is Deep Throat?

Just who is Deep Throat?


SUMMARY:

It's one of the great mysteries of recent American history: Thirty years after the Watergate break-in, the anonymous source whose crucial clues contributed to President Nixon's downfall has yet to be publicly identified.

Bob Woodward, who with Carl Bernstein helped unearth the White House's misdeeds for the Washington Post, has vowed not to tell all until the so-called "Deep Throat" dies or gives him the green light.

According to interviews Woodward and Bernstein have granted over the years, Deep Throat -- named after a '70s porn film -- is a man, is still alive, held a highly sensitive post within the executive branch, and was fond of Scotch and cigarettes.

As Woodward describes him, "He was, incongruously, an incurable gossip, careful to label rumor for what it was, but fascinated by it."

CNN NewsPass VIDEO
Thirty years after the Watergate scandal, CNN's Anne McDermott looks into the mystery of the informant known as 'Deep Throat' (June 17)

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'Deep Throat' remains a deep mystery 
 
EXTRA INFORMATION
Gallery: Watergate: the key players 
 
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Who do you think is Woodward and Bernstein's "Deep Throat?"

W. Mark Felt
L. Patrick Gray
Alexander Haig
Henry Kissinger
Diane Sawyer
John Sears
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Deep Throat
According to Bob Woodward
  • Is one individual
  • Is a man
  • Is still alive
  • Held an extremely sensitive position in the executive branch
  • As of 1972, Deep Throat was a smoker and was fond of Scotch
  • Before the term Deep Throat was coined, Woodward referred to him as an "old friend"

  • Although Woodward, Bernstein, former Post editor Ben Bradlee and Deep Throat himself are the only ones in the know, that hasn't stopped any number of former insiders and would-be experts from offering their theories.

    The latest comes from former Nixon aide John Dean, whose new book, "Unmasking Deep Throat," seeks to further winnow the list of suspects.

    CANDIDATES:

    Here's a look at several Deep Throat suspects put forth over the years:

    MARK FELT: The former FBI official is considered a leading candidate. White House tapes from 1972 recorded Nixon aide H.R. Haldeman telling the president that most of the leaks were coming from Felt. Also, the Hartford Courant newspaper reported that a 19-year-old it interviewed in 1999 said Bernstein's son Jacob had told him that Felt was Deep Throat. Bernstein and his ex-wife, Nora Ephron, deny he ever told his son.

    CHARLES BATES: The former assistant director of the FBI's General Investigative Division is considered another top candidate, according to journalist James Mann, who also listed Mark Felt. Bates had supervisory authority over the break-in.

    L. PATRICK GRAY: The former acting FBI director fits Woodward and Bernstein's description, lived close to Woodward, and was the only one of the suspects who could have met with Woodward on the pertinent dates, according to a CBS documentary.

    ROBERT KUNKEL: The former special agent was in charge of the FBI's Washington field office.

    HENRY KISSINGER: The former national security adviser and secretary of state is often cited as a candidate, if only for his proximity to Nixon, but there's little evidence that he's the guy.

    DAVID GERGEN: The Nixon adviser, who also served in the Ford, Reagan and Clinton administrations, threatened legal actions against Esquire magazine when the publication in 1976 named him as its top candidate. Former NBC correspondent Jim Miklaszewski has said he thinks Gergen is Deep Throat.

    PAT BUCHANAN: University of Illinois students working on a Watergate project unanimously fingered Buchanan in a recent study. Buchanan, was a speechwriter and special assistant in the Nixon administration. He later became a TV commentator and presidential candidate.

    RON ZIEGLER: Former White House press secretary

    LEONARD GARMENT: Former White House counsel and Nixon friend

    NAMES BERNSTEIN OR WOODWARD RULED OUT: Nixon chief of staff Al Haig, Watergate prosecutor Earl Silbert, Republican operative John Sears, CIA director William Colby (deceased), White House aide (now ABC anchor) Diane Sawyer, CIA official Cord Meyer (deceased).



     
     
     
     







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