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Pakistan moves to quell anti-U.S. protests

As the United States strikes Afghanistan for a second day, protesters gather again
As the United States strikes Afghanistan for a second day, protesters gather again  


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (CNN) -- Authorities in Pakistan have detained three leading pro-Taliban Muslim clerics in a bid to prevent them planning more anti-U.S. rallies during the Afghan bombing campaign.

The detentions came amid news that three protesters were shot dead on Tuesday by Pakistani police during a demonstration in the town of Kuchlak near the Afghan border.

Police say they opened fire after more than 1,000 protesters gathered and burned down a police station, attacked a police official and looted a post office.

In the city of Peshawar, police put on a strong show of force after they were forced to fire tear gas and guns to curb protests on Monday, says CNN's Mike Chinoy reporting from the Pakistani city.

Authorities have barred all protesters from entering major cities like Islamabad, Karachi and Quetta, as anger grows at the U.S.-led strikes on Afghanistan's Taliban rulers and the training camps of terrorist suspect Osama bin Laden.

In Quetta a demonstration was held on the outskirts of the city after authorities barred protesters from congregating in the city center.

In the nearby town of Malibak Taliban officials attended another protest, while demonstrations were also reported in Lahore and Peshawar.

In the western province of Baluchistan meanwhile, many people were also reported to have been arrested and several injured in a second day of violent anti-U.S. demonstrations.

Clerics arrested

In a bid to prevent further trouble on Tuesday police detained Maulana Fazal-ur Rehman, leader of the pro-Taliban Jamiat Ulema-e-Islam (JUI) party.

He has been under house arrest for much of the past two days after leading and planning demonstrations.

On Monday, anti-U.S. protestors went on the rampagne in the city of Quetta
On Monday, anti-U.S. protestors went on the rampagne in the city of Quetta  

Several Islamic clerics have called on Muslims in Pakistan and across the world to rise in jihad, or holy war, against the U.S.-led attacks.

Samiul Haq, pro-Taliban leader of the Afghan Defense Council, and Azam Tariq, chief of the Sipah-e-Sahaba party, have also been held.

Analysts say Pakistan's President, General Pervez Musharraf, is walking a political and religious tightrope as he attempts to balance his declared support for the global war on terrorism whilst trying not to enflame opposition to attacks on Afghanistan from radical Islamic groups.



 
 
 
 



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