ad info

CNN.com  U.S. News
  Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback

 

  Search
 
 

 
U.S.
TOP STORIES

California braced for weekend of power scrounging

Court order averts strike against Union Pacific railroad

U.S. warning at Davos forum

Two more Texas fugitives will contest extradition

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

Thousands dead in India; quake toll rapidly rising

Davos protesters confront police

California readies for weekend of power scrounging

Capriati upsets Hingis to win Australian Open

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

POLITICS

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

HEALTH

TRAVEL

FOOD

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


U.S. Senate urged to pass women's rights treaty

women's rights

March 5, 2000
Web posted at: 9:19 p.m. EST (0219 GMT)

WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Some female lawmakers on Capitol Hill will be marking International Women's Day this week by protesting the failure by the United States to pass a United Nations treaty that safeguards women's rights.

The U.N. treaty has been in limbo for decades, as the United States -- along with a small group of nations that includes Afghanistan and Iran -- has failed to sign the accord.

So far, 165 nations have ratified the treaty, called the "Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women."

Last October, several female House members interrupted the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, demanding a new hearing on the convention.

 VIDEO
VideoCNN's Kate Snow reports on the current push to get the treaty ratified by Congress.
Windows Media 28K 80K
 

Expect more of the same this week.

Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-California) is asking the committee to take up debate on the treaty prior to International Women's Day on Wednesday.

"I find it insulting that such a simple, straightforward bill of rights for women would languish in the greatest democracy in the world," Boxer said.

So far, 165 nations have ratified the treaty,

Senate has not ratified treaty

The United Nations adopted the treaty in 1979, and then-President Jimmy Carter signed it. But the treaty requires the approval of two-thirds of the Senate to be ratified. That is where the process is stuck.

One Republican opponent says the treaty imposes unfair obligations on the United States.

"That doesn't mean that we are not concerned about the condition of people, of children, of women, but the idea of it being managed and overriding U.S. policy -- I'm not there," said Sen. Paul Coverdell of Georgia.

Also opposed to the treaty is Sen. Jesse Helms (R-North Carolina), chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. His office declined to comment.

But Democrats on the committee acknowledge Helms has effectively blocked the issue from debate.

Supporters of the treaty say that is not likely to change unless the Republicans lose control of the Senate in November.



RELATED STORIES:
A new version of the ERA
August 25, 1999
'Torture, plain and simple': Amnesty International reports abuse in women's prisons
March 4, 1999

RELATED SITES:
United Nations
  • The Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women
  • International Women's Day

Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

 Search   


Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.