ad info

 
CNN.com  technology > computing
    Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 
TECHNOLOGY
TOP STORIES

Consumer group: Online privacy protections fall short

Guide to a wired Super Bowl

Debate opens on making e-commerce law consistent

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

More than 11,000 killed in India quake

Mideast negotiators want to continue talks after Israeli elections

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

ENTERTAINMENT

HEALTH

TRAVEL

FOOD

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


Software glitch grounds flights in L.A.

Computerworld

(IDG) -- A software-upgrade glitch is being blamed for sending air-traffic control systems at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) off-line early Thursday morning, causing a nationwide stoppage of all flights that were scheduled to land at or depart from the airport during a four-hour period.

Technicians loading new software at the Los Angeles air-traffic control center caused a mainframe host computer to crash at 6:58 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, said Fraser Jones, a spokesman for the Federal Aviation Association (FAA). The system was partially restored at 11:15 a.m. and fully restored by 1:05 p.m., he added.

MORE COMPUTING INTELLIGENCE
IDG.net   IDG.net home page
  Computerworld's home page
  Software glitch delays London flights
  Air-traffic control glitch hits Philly
  FAA faces more criticism for computer security failings
  Reviews & in-depth info at IDG.net
  E-BusinessWorld
  TechInformer
  Questions about computers? Let IDG.net's editors help you
  Subscribe to IDG.net's free daily newsletter for IT leaders
  Search IDG.net in 12 languages
  News Radio
  * Fusion audio primers
  * Computerworld Minute

The exact cause of the problem is under investigation, Jones said. Another FAA spokesman said the glitch occurred during an upgrade of software used as part of a system that processes radar data.

The Los Angeles air-traffic control center is in Palmdale, Calif., and is one of 20 such facilities that the FAA operates across the country for handling high-altitude flights operating at 17,000 feet and above. FAA officials won't know the full number of flights that were delayed by the software glitch until tomorrow, Jones said.

However, he added that air-traffic controllers at LAX can guide the landings and departures of approximately 84 flights per hour under normal circumstances. No flights took off or landed during the four hours that the system was down. During the period when the system had been partially restored, Jones said, the controllers could only handle 64 flights per hour.

Rob Enderle, a San Jose-based analyst at Giga Information Group Inc., had planned to travel to Los Angeles this morning to attend a conference. But his flight, slated to depart from San Jose at 8 a.m. Pacific Standard Time, was grounded on the tarmac due to the computer problem at LAX.

The plane eventually took off nearly four hours late, but Enderle already had decided to leave the plane because he had missed his scheduled appointment in Los Angeles. "It goes to show that the more complex a software system gets, the more likely there are to be problems down the line," he said.




RELATED STORIES:
FAA faces more criticism for computer security failings
September 29, 2000
Aviation looks to cut delays through technology
July 27, 2000
Senator introduces bill to make airlines more accountable
July 20, 2000
New plan aims to reduce air traffic delays
March 10, 2000
Airlines, FAA debate soaring flight delays
October 15, 1999

RELATED IDG.net STORIES:
Software glitch delays London flights
(Computerworld)
Planned tests alarm airlines
(Computerworld)
Computer glitch at Memphis Airport grounds, delays flights
(Computerworld)
FAA looks abroad for air-traffic control systems
(Computerworld)
FAA faces more criticism for computer security failings
(Computerworld)
Air-traffic control glitch hits Philly
(Computerworld)
FAA fixes Y2K glitch in aircraft location system
(InfoWorld)

RELATED SITES:
Federal Aviation Administration

Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

 Search   

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.