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Hotline lets you report crimes against children on the Internet

Civic.com

(IDG) -- In Michigan, people can now call a hotline if they see potential crimes against children on the Internet.

With a $300,000 grant from the Department of Justice Internet Crimes Against Children program, the attorney general's office and the state police are undertaking a large public relations campaign, teaching officers how to preserve computer records for trials and creating a task force composed of one federal and three state officers who will specialize in those cases.

  MESSAGE BOARD

"The most important thing in fighting cybercrime against children is telling the parents about the problem so they can watch their kids," said Terry Beng, assistant attorney general and chief of the High-tech Crime Unit, which covers all Internet crimes. "Then, you have to give them those tools so they know what to do."

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  Kids say the darndest things
  How awareness can prevent cybercrime

In addition to the 24-hour, toll-free hotline, the attorney general's office and the state police have begun an advertising campaign. On billboards throughout the state, and on mouse pads to be delivered to every school, the Big Bad Wolf sits at a computer with the words "Iām a little pig too" written across the screen.

The ads then warn parents: "Do you know who your kids are talking to? You should," and gives the hotline number. The mouse pads include the three little pigs reading the words of the wolf.

The state police will also distribute informational brochures about cybercrime against children.



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RELATED IDG.net STORIES:
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RELATED SITES:
Regional task force on Internet crimes against children

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