ad info

 
CNN.com  technology > computing
    Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 
TECHNOLOGY
TOP STORIES

Consumer group: Online privacy protections fall short

Guide to a wired Super Bowl

Debate opens on making e-commerce law consistent

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

More than 11,000 killed in India quake

Mideast negotiators want to continue talks after Israeli elections

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

ENTERTAINMENT

HEALTH

TRAVEL

FOOD

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


Do-it-yourself DSL installation

Network World Fusion

July 10, 2000
Web posted at: 10:14 a.m. EDT (1414 GMT)

(IDG) -- SBC Communications has made a move that could boost the rollout of DSL: having customers install the service themselves.

SBC is introducing a self-install kit that makes it easier for SBC to get the customer's phone line tuned-up to handle DSL.

Customers are required to set up the DSL modem, install passive filters on phone lines, load software on their PCs and, if necessary, install an Ethernet network interface card.

MORE COMPUTING INTELLIGENCE
IDG.net   IDG.net home page
  Network World Fusion home page
  Free Network World Fusion newsletters
  IDG.net's technical development page
  IDG.net's networking page
  Reviews & in-depth info at IDG.net
  E-BusinessWorld
  TechInformer
  Questions about computers? Let IDG.net's editors help you
  Subscribe to IDG.net's free daily newsletter for network experts
  Search IDG.net in 12 languages
  News Radio
  * Fusion audio primers
  * Computerworld Minute

The company claims average installation time is about 1 hour. A help desk is available seven days a week.

The service is available in only part of its territory, including the original SBC region in the mid-West and Texas. California, Nevada and Connecticut. It does not include the former Ameritech region.

The self-install kit is available for PCs running Windows 95 and 98 and is only for SBC's Basic DSL service, which is capable of a maximum 1.5M bit/sec downloads.

Later this year, it will be available for Windows 2000, Windows NT, Linux and Macintosh operating systems and SBC's Enhanced DSL service, which runs at the same speed, but comes with five static IP addresses.

The service has a guaranteed downstream rate of 384K bit/sec between customer sites and the switching office that serves customer sites. Actual download speeds from Web sites depend on the speed of connections between the switching office and the Web sites.

At the end of the first quarter of 2000, SBC said it had 201,000 DSL lines in service. It says it will have one million in service by year-end.



RELATED STORIES:
Is DSL worth the hassle?
May 31, 2000
Technology hits a home run at Giants' Pac Bell Park
May 29, 2000
DSL carriers seek free use of phone wires
April 28, 2000
The last mile access race is heating up
April 27, 2000
The streaming speed limit
April 21, 2000
IP multicasting over DSL
February 8, 2000
Doubling DSL's distance
February 1, 2000
The turn to opitical switching
January 25, 2000
IBM and Cisco collaborate to prioritize network traffic
January 27, 2000

RELATED IDG.net STORIES:
DSL forum demonstrates interoperability
(IDG.net)
Hackers attack DSL, cable modem users
(IDG.net)
How to avoid broadband headaches
(PC World.com)
Will DSL modems go soft?
(PC World.com)
Voice over DSL gets ready to roll
(PC World.com)
Free DSL: All talk, little action?
(PC World.com)
SBC gets OK on long distance
(InfoWorld.com)

RELATED SITES:
SBC Communications homepage

Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

 Search   

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.