ad info

 
CNN.com  technology > computing
    Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 
TECHNOLOGY
TOP STORIES

Consumer group: Online privacy protections fall short

Guide to a wired Super Bowl

Debate opens on making e-commerce law consistent

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

More than 11,000 killed in India quake

Mideast negotiators want to continue talks after Israeli elections

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

ENTERTAINMENT

HEALTH

TRAVEL

FOOD

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


Move MP3s to your home stereo

PC World

May 1, 2000
Web posted at: 8:38 a.m. EDT (1238 GMT)

NEW ORLEANS (IDG) -- Voyetra Turtle Beach wants to bring the digital music revolution into the living room this fall with a device that links your PC to your home stereo. The company unveiled its AudioTron home stereo at the Windows Hardware Engineering Conference (WinHEC) here this week.

The Windows CE device connects to a stereo receiver or amplifier, as you would expect. But in the back of the AudioTron is a phone jack that links it to a home phone line network and ultimately to your PC.

  MESSAGE BOARD
 
  ALSO
 

It can remotely scan your computer's hard disk for Windows WMA and MP3 digital audio files. Using either the base unit or a remote control, you can play all the digital music stored on your PC. AudioTron also supplies the programs to create custom play lists, or you can specify random playbacks of available tunes. An LCD shows song titles.

"The problem with PCs is you've got this massive concentration of media in the least opportune place in your house," says Howard Brown, chief technology officer for Voyetra Turtle Beach.

MORE COMPUTING INTELLIGENCE
IDG.net   IDG.net home page
  Plug your stereo into the Web
  More bands jump on anti-Napster wagon
  Swap MP3s, go to jail?
  How MP3 works
  Reviews & in-depth info at IDG.net
  E-Business World
  Year 2000 World
  Questions about computers? Let IDG.net's editors help you
  Subscribe to IDG.net's free daily newsletter for computer geniuses (& newbies)
  Search IDG.net in 12 languages
  News Radio
  * Fusion audio primers
  * Computerworld Minute

The AudioTron is scheduled to ship this fall priced between $250 and $500, according to company representatives. A home phone line networking card is required for each PC that you plug AudioTron into; and the unit supports the Home PNA 2.0 specification. An add-on board providing Ethernet and Universal Serial Bus connections will be available for use in homes or offices wired with a dedicated network.

Brown says the device supports WMA streaming audio files that will allow you to listen to Internet radio stations. However, Brown can't say for sure whether the fall version of the AudioTron will support streaming audio content.

Turtle Beach says it is working with a number of music labels to give AudioTron owners the ability to audition and purchase songs through the unit.

AudioTron will compete with a growing number of devices like Kerbango, a stand-alone Internet radio appliance that plugs into a standard phone line and streams audio content. Another, similar service is X10's MP3 Anywhere, which lets you route audio from a single PC to your stereo, through a transmitter.

Voyetra Turtle Beach also markets its technology to vendors that package it for sale with other equipment and under other brand names.




RELATED STORIES:
RealJukebox: MP3 for dummies
April 30, 2000
Gnutella finds friends among MP3 enthusiasts
March 29, 2000
Play MP3s on cassette with FlashTrax
March 27, 2000
Opinion: How record companies could embrace Napster and maintain profits
March 20, 2000
Big record houses go digital this summer
March 9, 2000
Personalized, portable Net radio coming to town
March 8, 2000
WOW Thing, you make my Mac sing
March 7, 2000

RELATED IDG.net STORIES:
Plug your stereo into the Web
(PC World Online)
Reroute MP3 to your stereo
(PC World Online)
Appliances get smart
(PC World Online)
Meet the men behind the MP3 format
(The Industry Standard)
Listen to MP3s, save the environment?
(The Industry Standard)
More bands jump on anti-Napster wagon
(The Industry Standard)
Swap MP3s, go to jail?
(PC World Online)
How MP3 works
(PC World Online)

RELATED SITES:
Voyetra Turtle Beach Inc.
Kerbango, Inc.
AudioRamp.com
X10

Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

 Search   

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.