ad info

 
CNN.com  technology > computing
    Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 
TECHNOLOGY
TOP STORIES

Consumer group: Online privacy protections fall short

Guide to a wired Super Bowl

Debate opens on making e-commerce law consistent

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

More than 11,000 killed in India quake

Mideast negotiators want to continue talks after Israeli elections

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

ENTERTAINMENT

HEALTH

TRAVEL

FOOD

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


Espionage on Usenet?

Network World Fusion

April 21, 2000
Web posted at: 9:26 a.m. EDT (1326 GMT)

(IDG) -- Now here's an interesting story that you would expect to find in a Tom Clancy novel: It seems a nine-page NATO memo detailing the rules of engagement for soldiers serving in Kosovo was made public, even though it was classified as "Top Secret." The story was printed in the April 2 issue of The Sunday Telegraph, a U.K. newspaper, and reported by the BBC.

MORE COMPUTING INTELLIGENCE
IDG.net   IDG.net home page
  Network World Fusion home page
  Free Network World Fusion newsletters
  IDG.net's bridges & routers page
  IDG.net's network operating systems page
  Reviews & in-depth info at IDG.net
  E-BusinessWorld
  Year 2000 World
  Questions about computers? Let IDG.net's editors help you
  Subscribe to IDG.net's free daily newsletter for network experts
  Search IDG.net in 12 languages
  News Radio
  * Fusion audio primers
  * Computerworld Minute

There is some confusion on where the document appeared. The Telegraph story says it turned up in the e-mail of a London publishing company, which quickly reported the find to the proper authorities. Another version of the story said the ultrasecret memo was posted on Usenet groups. So, how does a top-secret memo get out into the public?

Seems as if a computer virus on a NATO computer leaked the information. There are some viruses on the loose that allegedly e-mail or post user names and passwords to provide the virus' author easy access to unsuspecting user's systems, but I've never heard of one posting entire files on the Internet.

But here comes the real twist: Some say the memo was posted to Usenet, but later deleted by Web crawlers developed by the Department of Defense that are designed to destroy controversial postings. Hmmm...a conspiracy in the making?

Two things to take away from this strange episode: 1. Make sure your antivirus detectors are up to date. No one wants their corporate secrets plastered all over the 'Net. 2. Does it worry anyone that the government could be trolling newsgroups and deleting postings it deems controversial? Isn't that censorship?




RELATED STORIES:
Echelon: The skies have ears
December 30, 1999
What has the world of espionage come to?
November 16, 1999

E-mail doesn't have to be opened to release virus
May 13, 1999

RELATED IDG.net STORIES:
Bug knocks Active Directory for a loop
(Network World Fusion)
Practice safe computing
(PC World)
Frisking computers at the door
(Network World Fusion)
State CIOs look into the 'e-future'
(Civic.com)
Standardizing network vulnerabilities
(Network World Fusion)
'Melting Worm' slithers into the wild
(Computerworld)
Panel: Don't rush into selecting security methods
(IDG.net)
What's the legal future of cyberspace?
(SunWorld)

RELATED SITES:
Allaire Forums 2.0.5 security patch
Denial-of-service vulnerability in BeOS?
Microsoft patch for "XLM Text Macro" vulnerability

Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

 Search   

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.