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COMPUTING

Microsoft, Intel donation to help train 400,000 teachers

January 25, 2000
Web posted at: 12:40 p.m. EST (1740 GMT)

by Dan Caterinicchia

From...
Civic.com

(IDG) -- Microsoft Corp. will donate $344 million in software to Intel Corp.'s Teach to the Future program, which is designed to train more than 400,000 classroom teachers to use technology to improve teaching and learning.

During the next three years, Intel will invest $100 million in cash, equipment, curriculum development and program management to provide teacher-led training in 20 countries. U.S. regions targeted for the first year include Arizona, Northern California, Oregon and Texas, followed by Washington and New Mexico.

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The Intel curriculum is modeled after its Applying Computers in Education project, which consists of 10 four-hour classes. The program will offer training in the use of the Internet, World Wide Web page design and multimedia software. Teachers also will learn how, when and where to incorporate technology tools and resources into lesson plans, as well as how to create assessment tools and align lessons with district, state and national standards.

A survey conducted in conjunction with a pilot program revealed that 84 percent of teachers said using computers improved their instruction and 80 percent said their students' learning was enhanced.

Plans call for the establishment of 20 training agencies in the United States by 2002 that will train 100,000 domestic teachers. An additional 300,000 teachers worldwide are also expected to participate in the program.

Microsoft's hefty donation is the single largest in the Redmond, Wash.-based company's history. It allows all 400,000 participating teachers to receive a free copy of both Office 2000 Professional and the Encarta 2000 multimedia encyclopedia -- both of which are featured in the Intel curriculum. After being properly trained in how to use the programs, the teachers will take the software back to their classrooms.



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