Skip to main content
ad info

  entertainment > movies
 
  Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback

 

  Search
 
 

 
ENTERTAINMENT
TOP STORIES

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

More than 11,000 killed in India quake

Mideast negotiators want to continue talks after Israeli elections

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

HEALTH

TRAVEL

FOOD

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


Humanity in danger again!

Ever-imperiled Earth hangs in the balance in 'Titan A.E.'

movie strip

June 16, 2000
Web posted at: 1:12 p.m. EDT (1712 GMT)

"Titan A.E.," the new animated film from cartoon veterans Don Bluth and Gary Goldman, features classic cartoon storytelling and an all-star cast.

Matt Damon, Bill Pullman, Drew Barrymore, John Leguizamo, Janeane Garofalo and Nathan Lane all add their voices to the mix. The screenplay by Ben Edlund, John August and Joss Wheldon is aimed at a teen-age market, and pulls inspiration from a number of sources such as the "Star Wars" and "Alien" franchises, and -- oddly enough -- "The Wizard Of Oz."

Damon provides the voice of Cale, a human refugee and reluctant hero who holds the key to mankind's survival in the year 3028. Earth has been destroyed by the Drej, a vicious alien race. Humans have been reduced to running from the Drej, who search out and kill their prey one by one.

Cale's late father (Ron Perlman), a brilliant scientist, invented the Titan, a spaceship that can save the human race. But the ship's location is a secret embedded in a genetically encoded ring. A mysterious space captain, Korso (Pullman), who knew the scientist, gives Cale the ring.

Now Cale and his motley crew -- Gune (Leguizamo) a brilliant navigator; Preed (Lane), a wise-cracking and suspicious first mate; Stith (Garofalo), a weapons specialist with an attitude problem; and Akima (Barrymore), a beautiful, highly skilled pilot -- are mankind's only hope.

If this sounds familiar...

Rings bells, doesn't it? Replace Korso with the name "Obi-Wan Kenobi" (at least for the beginning of the film), Akima with "Princess Leia" and call Cale "Luke Skywalker." Teach them that there's no place like home, and you get the drift. There's even a scene that reminds viewers of flying monkeys.

 VIDEO
VideoTheatrical preview for "Titan A.E."
Real 28K 80K
Windows Media 28K 80K
 
  MORE REVIEWS

You be the critic! Recommend a movie on our message board

Yes, "Titan A.E." borrows liberally from other classic adventure stories, but that doesn't lessen the enjoyment.

This $65 million film is full of wonderfully eccentric characters, great animation and witty dialogue. "I happen to be humanity's last great hope," Cale boasts at one point. "I weep for the species," first-mate Preed shoots back.

The film is visually splendid. Bluth and Goldman have achieved a highly enjoyable mix of adventure and fantasy -- creating, for example, a world where hydrogen trees explode. The villainous Drej are a bit disappointing: Made of pulsating blue light, these skeletal creatures are cold and ruthless-looking, but not all that scary.

Still, "Titan A.E." provides that staple of summer moviegoing fun -- a rousing, popcorn-chomping adventure tale that can younger children, teens and adults can enjoy. Maybe Earth has a chance.

"Titan A.E." opens nationwide on Friday and is rated PG. 95 minutes.



RELATED STORIES:
Cruising into long, loud summer movie season
May 25, 2000

RELATED SITES:
"Titan A.E."

Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

 Search   


Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.