ad info




CNN.com
 MAIN PAGE
 WORLD
 U.S.
 LOCAL
 POLITICS
 WEATHER
 BUSINESS
 SPORTS
 TECHNOLOGY
 SPACE
 HEALTH
 ENTERTAINMENT
 BOOKS
 TRAVEL
 FOOD
 ARTS & STYLE
* NATURE
 IN-DEPTH
 ANALYSIS
 myCNN

 Headline News brief
 news quiz
 daily almanac

  MULTIMEDIA:
 video
 video archive
 audio
 multimedia showcase
 more services

  E-MAIL:
Subscribe to one of our news e-mail lists.
Enter your address:
Or:
Get a free e-mail account

 DISCUSSION:
 message boards
 chat
 feedback

  CNN WEB SITES:
CNN Websites
 AsiaNow
 En Español
 Em Português
 Svenska
 Norge
 Danmark
 Italian

 FASTER ACCESS:
 europe
 japan

 TIME INC. SITES:
 CNN NETWORKS:
Networks image
 more networks
 transcripts

 SITE INFO:
 help
 contents
 search
 ad info
 jobs

 WEB SERVICES:

 
NATURE

New national monument a sore spot for some Arizonans

canyon
Monument designation bans mining, timber cutting and other large-scale development  

January 11, 2000
Web posted at: 12:35 a.m. EST (0535 GMT)

By Correspondent Jim Hill

GRAND CANYON, Arizona (CNN) -- President Clinton is scheduled to visit one of the most revered natural wonders in the United States on Tuesday, the Grand Canyon. But some nearby residents say they are not happy about Clinton's visit and the reason for it.

The president is expected to expand the national monument status of the region to include about 1 million acres of land near the canyon.

Residents of Fredonia, Arizona, which is near the proposed Grand Canyon/Parashant National Monument, fear federal restrictions associated with national monument status will replace their quiet lifestyle with a hectic, tourist economy.

 VIDEO
VideoCNN's Jim Hill looks at the controversy sparked by the proposed Grand Canyon/Parashant National Monument.
Real 28K 80K
Windows Media 28K 80K
 
  MESSAGE BOARD
Saving the environment

 

"I thought we were going to have some input," said Fredonia Mayor Joy Jordan. "But things have not worked out that way at all. So I feel very sad and very helpless."

Clinton is using the federal Antiquities Act of 1906 to establish new national monuments. The new designation would ban mining, timber cutting or other large-scale development, limiting the income of many area residents involved in those industries.

Observers say the situation represents a struggle between local governments -- which often serve residents by making use of natural resources -- and federal officials who want to serve all citizens by preserving those same resources.

"These two things are clashing as development is increasing," said Professor Sheldon Kamieniecki of the University of Southern California. "I think as we move into the century that question is going to be how do you balance the two?"



RELATED STORIES:
Yellowstone, Grand Canyon among top endangered lands, group says
June 21, 1999

RELATED SITES:
Grand Canyon Tourism and National Park Information
Welcome to the State of Arizona
Proposed National Monument
Statement of the Honorable Bruce Babbitt, Secretary of the Interior
Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

 LATEST HEADLINES:
SEARCH CNN.com
Enter keyword(s)   go    help

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.