Skip to main content
ad info

 
CNN.com
  health > diet & fitness AIDS Aging Alternative Medicine Cancer Children Diet & Fitness Men Women
  Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 
HEALTH
TOP STORIES

New treatments hold out hope for breast cancer patients

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

Thousands dead in India; quake toll rapidly rising

Israelis, Palestinians make final push before Israeli election

Davos protesters confront police

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

POLITICS

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

TRAVEL

FOOD

ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*

 
CNN Websites
Networks image


Coffee brews trouble for the naturally nervous

Coffee brews trouble for the naturally nervous

In this story:

Runaway anxiety

No-Doz cocktails

RELATEDSicon



(WebMD) -- When patients come to psychologist Norman B. Schmidt, Ph.D., complaining of panic attacks, one question he asks is, Do you drink coffee? And, by chance, does your anxiety strike shortly after you drink coffee, say, in the morning on the way to work?

If the answer is yes, he has a surprising treatment: more coffee. But now these patients carefully sip their java while noting their physical reactions. That way, Schmidt hopes, they'll learn to recognize their pounding hearts and quickened pulses for what those symptoms really represent: a caffeine-induced buzz.

With coffeehouses springing up on every street corner, researchers like Schmidt are increasingly concerned about caffeine's role in panic and other anxiety disorders. Indeed, caffeine's power has become so well recognized that the American Psychiatric Association has added three related disorders to its list of official diagnoses: caffeine intoxication, caffeine-related anxiety and caffeine-related sleep disorders.

"Caffeine is the most widely used mood-altering drug in the world," says Roland Griffiths, Ph.D., a professor in the departments of psychiatry and neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "People often see coffee, tea and soft drinks simply as beverages rather than vehicles for a psychoactive drug. But caffeine can exacerbate anxiety and panic disorders."

It's no surprise that caffeine gets so much attention from scientists these days. After all, 80 percent of Americans drink it. In fact, occasional coffee consumption rose 6 percent in the last year alone, according to the National Coffee Association. At the same time, panic and other anxiety disorders have become the most common mental illnesses in the United States. When caffeine overlaps with these disorders, the result can be trouble.

"If you tend to be a high-strung, anxious person," says Schmidt, "using a lot of caffeine can be risky."

Runaway anxiety

Technically, caffeine works by blocking the depressant function of a chemical called adenosine, says Griffiths. For most of us, the result is a pleasurable sense of energy and focus. Indeed, a British study published in the October 1999 issue of the journal Human Psychopharmacology confirmed what most latte-lovers already know: Caffeine enhances alertness, concentration, and memory.

Drink more coffee than you're accustomed to, however, and that same stimulant can cause the jitters. And in people predisposed to anxiety disorders, caffeine can trigger a spiral of sensations -- sweaty palms, a pounding heart, ringing in the ears -- that leads to a full-blown panic attack.

What makes some of us feel panic while others feel pleasantly alert? Susceptible people experience caffeine's effects as signs of impending doom. Once that happens, anxiety can take on a life of its own. While many give up coffee, others give up whatever they were doing when struck by caffeine's disturbing side effects. Someone who downs coffee at breakfast and then hops on the freeway to work, for example, may attribute feelings of panic to rush-hour traffic rather than to caffeine.

NoDoz cocktails

To help people with panic and related anxiety disorders, psychologists typically ask patients to taper their caffeine use while they learn how to respond appropriately to their own physiological reactions. At the Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders in Albany, New York, psychologist John Forsyth, Ph.D., uses an approach known as cognitive-behavioral therapy. Gradually, patients learn to interpret their symptoms. A fast-beating heart, they discover, is the body's normal reaction to a stimulant like caffeine -- not a sign of an impending heart attack.

But not all psychologists think that avoiding caffeine is a long-term cure. Norman Schmidt, an associate professor of psychology at Ohio State University, is one who actually prescribes coffee as part of treatment. The goal? To help patients confront their fears head-on and learn to distinguish unfounded panic from a real threat.

After teaching patients to recognize caffeine's effects, Schmidt has them desensitize themselves by gradually increasing their consumption of caffeine over the course of a month or two. Patients start with sips of soda, then work up to a cup of coffee.

The final exam? A strong cup of coffee spiked with NoDoz. "They don't feel great, but they learn they can have these feelings and nothing terrible happens," says Schmidt. "We could tell them that over and over again, but they've got to know it in their gut."

If patients ending treatment announce they still don't intend to drink coffee, Schmidt knows they haven't overcome their unfounded fear. So there's one more test they must pass. He tells them to down a triple espresso without triggering a panic attack.

Says Schmidt: "We call it the 'Starbucks challenge.' "

© 2000 Healtheon/WebMD. All rights reserved.



RELATEDS AT WebMD:
Giving coffee a break
Caffeine in the diet
Anxiety disorder is as common and debilitating as depression

RELATED SITES:
Freedom from fear
National Institute of Mental Health: Facts about anxiety disorders
Ohio State University Anxiety and Stress Disorders Clinic
Note: Pages will open in a new browser window
External sites are not endorsed by CNN Interactive.

 Search   

Back to the top   © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.