Skip to main content
ad info

 
CNN.com AllPolitics
  Editions | myCNN | Video | Audio | Headline News Brief | Free E-mail | Feedback  

 

  Search
 
 

 
POLITICS
TOP STORIES

Analysis indicates many Gore votes thrown out in Florida

Clinton's chief of staff calls White House over vandalism reports

Gephardt talks bipartisanship, outlines differences

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

India tends to quake survivors

Two Oklahoma State players among 10 killed in plane crash

Sharon calls peace talks a campaign ploy by Barak

Police arrest 100 Davos protesters

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

HEALTH

TRAVEL

FOOD

Texas cattle quarantined after violation of mad-cow feed ban
ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


Clock is running on presidential transition effort

WASHINGTON (CNN) --The clock is running, and key elements of the presidential transition remain stalled.

Graphic
 

Required FBI background checks of hundreds of key appointees can't begin because there's no official president-elect. Crucial jobs just below cabinet rank could go unfilled in the early days of a George W. Bush administration.

"The problem there is if you want to give direction to the bureaucracy to stop doing certain things or to start doing new things, you've got to have that neck in place to transfer the signals from the brain -- the president and the cabinet -- down to the career layer and the body," says Paul Light, an analyst with the Brookings Institution.

Appointments and FBI checks aren't much of an issue for Vice President Al Gore -- a Democratic administration is already in place. And if Gore emerges the winner, he could replace them -- or not -- at his leisure.

Another issue -- for Bush -- is access to information about last-minute federal regulations or enforcement actions he might want to stop.

  ALSO
 

"The departments and agencies will not accept you or embrace you until they're told that, in fact, there is a president-elect. So nothing can be done right now formally, and very little can be done informally by way of getting information about what agencies are or are not doing," says Light.

The Clinton administration says it will supply some information to both campaigns, although Bush won't be able to put his team members inside federal agencies just yet. The vice president, of course, is fully in the loop.

As for international policy and military matters, Gore is a member of the National Security Council and remains fully briefed. Bush will also continue to receive national security briefings as he did when he was a candidate.

A bigger potential problem could be the next federal budget. The new president has to submit one 14 days after taking office. Will here be time?

Alvin Felzenberg, an analyst with the Heritage Foundation, says yes.

"We're talking about fiscal year 2002," Felzenberg told CNN. "And preparations for that normally begin very, very early, and I suspect they're already under way now."

For the time being, logistics are only a minor issue. Neither Bush nor Gore can occupy the official transition office space in Washington or claim the $5.3 million in federal funds for the move into power.

But Gore already has a government office. And the Bush team will raise private money and rent their own.


MORE STORIES:

Monday, November 27, 2000

ARCHIVES

 Search   

Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.