ad info

 
CNN.com Allpoliticsallpolitics.comwith TIME
   
 

 

  Search
 
 

 
POLITICS
TOP STORIES

Analysis indicates many Gore votes thrown out in Florida

Clinton's chief of staff calls White House over vandalism reports

Gephardt talks bipartisanship, outlines differences

(MORE)

TOP STORIES

India tends to quake survivors

Two Oklahoma State players among 10 killed in plane crash

Sharon calls peace talks a campaign ploy by Barak

Police arrest 100 Davos protesters

(MORE)

MARKETS
4:30pm ET, 4/16
144.70
8257.60
3.71
1394.72
10.90
879.91
 


WORLD

U.S.

LAW

TECHNOLOGY

ENTERTAINMENT

HEALTH

TRAVEL

FOOD

Texas cattle quarantined after violation of mad-cow feed ban
ARTS & STYLE



(MORE HEADLINES)
*
 
CNN Websites
Networks image


New York House member drops Bush, backs McCain

King cites Bush appearance at Bob Jones University

February 21, 2000
Web posted at: 12:18 p.m. EST (1718 GMT)

NEW YORK (CNN) -- Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., switched allegiance in the GOP presidential race Monday, dropping his support of George W. Bush for, in King's words, becoming a tool of "anti-Catholic bigoted forces."

King, endorsing the candidacy of Sen. John McCain, charged that the Texas governor "allowed himself to be used" when he agreed to speak at Bob Jones University during the South Carolina primary campaign.

The fundamentalist Christian school prohibits interracial dating and its officials refer to the Catholic and Mormon religions as cults. King referred to the university as "anti-black and anti-Catholic."

"I happen to be a Roman Catholic myself," King said. "And I was just shocked at the person who wants to be the leader of my party and the leader of the country would allow would allow his campaign to be used by anti-Catholic bigoted forces."

In Detroit Monday, Bush defended speaking at the school early in the campaign in which he went on to defeat McCain by 11 percentage points.

"When asked about interracial dating, I didn't hesitate to say, of course I don't accept their policy," Bush said at a breakfast sponsored by the Economic Club of Detroit.

"But I didn't go to accept their policy. I wanted them to accept my policy. That's why I went to give the speech."

The next big matchup between Bush and McCain is Tuesday in Michigan, which is heavily Catholic -- Gov. John Engler, Bush's chief supporter, among them.

"No matter how he tries to explain it, going to a school which is anti-Catholic with his campaign's seal of approval on that school, on its policies -- and as a Catholic I can no longer support Governor Bush in the (New York) primary."

The Catholic vote also is expected to be influential in New York, which has its primary March 7.

King charged that Bush, after the upset trouncing he got from McCain in New Hampshire, agreed to speak at Bob Jones because "he was so desperate to be elected in South Carolina."

"To me that shows a clear lack of judgment, and also quite frankly, a lack of moral compass," King said.

 
ELECTION 2000


CALENDAR
See how quickly the primary and caucus season will take off with this calendar.


VIDEO
Watch selected policy speeches and campaign commercials from the major presidential candidates.


WHAT'S AT STAKE


HISTORY
If you have a Flash-capable browser, take a look at the history of key events during the primary season.


CANDIDATE BIOS
Quick takes on the White House hopefuls.


RACES
If you need to know who's up in 1999 or 2000 and what seats are open launch this quick guide.


THE STATES
Who are your elected officials? What is the past presidential vote and number of electoral votes in your state? Find out with these state political and election facts.


POLLS
Check out the latest numbers or dig back into the poll archives.


WHO'S IN-WHO'S OUT
Who is running, who isn't running and who has already dropped out? Check out our tally sheet.


FOLLOW THE MONEY
How much money have the candidates raised? Here are their quarterly reports to the Federal Election Commission.


E-MAIL UPDATES
Receive news about a candidate by e-mail.

Your e-mail address: Mind-it Button


COMMUNITY



MORE STORIES:

Monday, February 21, 2000


 Search   

Back to the top  © 2001 Cable News Network. All Rights Reserved.
Terms under which this service is provided to you.
Read our privacy guidelines.